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Thread: Grammar

  1. #371
    MRD
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3426869;
    While there are many, many, many areas where the corruption of language irks the hell out of me, casual language in an informal setting doesn't bother me at all. Should the queen thank you for the gift of a crystal decanter of maple syrup and a tortiere, a "no problem" just does not cut the mustard. The trouble is many people don't seem to understand situational language usage. This also applies to the accursed "my bad". There is no situation where an insincere apology is acceptable. If you're going to apologize, then apologize and mean it. And honestly, I feel the same way about darn, gosh, frak and the like. If you're going to swear, then swear.
    I always assume the "real" swear word when I hear people use words like "gosh darn it" or "Oh, Fudge". I once told my very pious sister that after she let out an "Oh Fudge" (we know what you REALLY mean by that) and she quit saying it.

    I also agree about the use of situational language. And the use of "my bad". I do not feel like "my bad" is a sincere apology. It's sort of like the faux apology: "I'm sorry if you were offended." You're only sorry if the person was offended. You aren't really sorry and it isn't really an apology. It puts it off on the other person for being offended and not the offendee for doing the offending.
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  2. #372
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    THings should and do evolve over time. However, they should not get reduced to the lowest common denominator as happens nowadays. Why bother to teach kids to say please, thank you, you're welcome, etc. if they are no longer required in our society?
    Gore Vidal spoke at the book festival they held here over the weekend. He mentioned the differences in speech between Americans and British. And, he went on to say why the British are always considered more erudite than Americans.
    I guess I will always aspire to sound more like Gore Vidal than Ms. Average American. :nono
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  3. #373
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by norealityhere;3427258;
    THings should and do evolve over time. However, they should not get reduced to the lowest common denominator as happens nowadays. Why bother to teach kids to say please, thank you, you're welcome, etc. if they are no longer required in our society?
    Gore Vidal spoke at the book festival they held here over the weekend. He mentioned the differences in speech between Americans and British. And, he went on to say why the British are always considered more erudite than Americans.
    I guess I will always aspire to sound more like Gore Vidal than Ms. Average American. :nono
    I LOVE Gore Vidal. His use of language is stunning. He is so witty and can also be very "cutting" without sounding b*tchy about it. Which is a very clever use of language to cut someone down and make them think you complimented them.

    I just read a short bio of him recently. His given name is not Gore. That was his grandfather's name and he took it. He's also distantly related to Al Gore. And I think his feud with Truman Capote was pretty funny as well. Some of the things they said and wrote about each other I found to be humerous.
    Last edited by MRD; 04-28-2009 at 03:30 PM.
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  4. #374
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by norealityhere;3427258;
    THings should and do evolve over time. However, they should not get reduced to the lowest common denominator as happens nowadays. Why bother to teach kids to say please, thank you, you're welcome, etc. if they are no longer required in our society?
    Gore Vidal spoke at the book festival they held here over the weekend. He mentioned the differences in speech between Americans and British. And, he went on to say why the British are always considered more erudite than Americans.
    I guess I will always aspire to sound more like Gore Vidal than Ms. Average American. :nono
    I'm going to have to believe that Mr. Vidal has not been hanging out with Ms. Average Brit, then . My family's English, my best female friend lives in England, my best male friend is English, and I lived in London when I was younger. Believe me, England has its fair share of linguistic offences. Not from my family, mind you. My family is all snobs and writers. They have sneered at me for sounding "Canadian".
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  5. #375
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3427335;
    I'm going to have to believe that Mr. Vidal has not been hanging out with Ms. Average Brit, then . My family's English, my best female friend lives in England, my best male friend is English, and I lived in London when I was younger. Believe me, England has its fair share of linguistic offences. Not from my family, mind you. My family is all snobs and writers. They have sneered at me for sounding "Canadian".
    Guessing he wasn't talking about "Cockney" English.
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  6. #376
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;3427345;
    Guessing he wasn't talking about "Cockney" English.
    Cor, take a butcher's at that geezer telling porkies. There'll be a bit of a barney if he don't quit. Nuff said, yeah?
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  7. #377
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3427390;
    Cor, take a butcher's at that geezer telling porkies. There'll be a bit of a barney if he don't quit. Nuff said, yeah?
    , the only part I "got" was the "barney" part. And I can't even remember where I heard the definition of that one. (and well Geezer, I think that one is sort of self explanatory. )
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  8. #378
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3427335;
    I'm going to have to believe that Mr. Vidal has not been hanging out with Ms. Average Brit, then . My family's English, my best female friend lives in England, my best male friend is English, and I lived in London when I was younger. Believe me, England has its fair share of linguistic offences. Not from my family, mind you. My family is all snobs and writers. They have sneered at me for sounding "Canadian".
    Too funny.
    No, he was not hanging out with the Average Brit, cockney or otherwise, as MRD suggested.
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;3427429;
    , the only part I "got" was the "barney" part. And I can't even remember where I heard the definition of that one. (and well Geezer, I think that one is sort of self explanatory. )
    Cor - generic exclamation
    take a butcher's - look (butcher's hook)
    geezer - bloke, guy, dude
    telling porkies - lie (pork pie - this one I'm guessing on based on my many hours of watching "A Touch of Frost")
    barney - kerfuffle
    if he don't quit. Nuff said, yeah? - self-explanatory

    Hope this helps .
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  10. #380
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog;3427277;
    I LOVE Gore Vidal. His use of language is stunning. He is so witty and can also be very "cutting" without sounding b*tchy about it. Which is a very clever use of language to cut someone down and make them think you complimented them.

    I just read a short bio of him recently. His given name is not Gore. That was his grandfather's name and he took it. He's also distantly related to Al Gore. And I think his feud with Truman Capote was pretty funny as well. Some of the things they said and wrote about each other I found to be humerous.
    Yes, his use of language is quite stunning.
    When I was a kid, he used to debate with William F. Buckley, Jr. The left vs. the right. Both of them were so aticulate and well spoken, though, so it was a joy to hear each of them and, to hopefully be able to emulate their language one day.
    To Thine Own Self Be True

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