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Thread: Grammar

  1. #361
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by queenb;3425924;
    We don't hear that in this area; instead, it's "no problem" or 'not a problem' as an answer to "thank you" instead of "you're welcome"or even when you finish placing an order in a restaurant or otherwise require paid help.
    Statement: "I need an oil change and new wiper blades.
    Reply: "no problem. "

    I certainly hope I'm not troubling you with my business, doofus!
    Oddly, the "no problem" doesn't bother me (and I will admit to having said it a time or two...or two thousand ). This may be because the words in French and Spanish for you're welcome "de rien" and "de nada" essentially mean "it's nothing", so I just consider the "no problem" to be the English equivalent.
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  2. #362
    FORT Fogey norealityhere's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    I think the "no problem" response to thank you shows how much we have bast**dized the English language until it is almost unrecognizable. TV programs now regularly say "my bad" when a character makes a mistake or an error. Why can't they just talk in simple English? Why the need to speak in text language?
    Sorry, but as an English major, it is absolutely appalling to me to see what is happening to our language. When I was growing up, I used to study the dictionary on a regular basis in order to strengthen my vocabulary. Nowadays, I guess people want to appear to be as average and mediocre as they possibly can be. Sadly, they seem to be succeeding.
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  3. #363
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    I'm guilty of saying "Good on you", but I had a foreign exchange student from New Zealand for a year and picked it up from her and I now have a co-worker who is Scottish and he says it too.

    Don't get me started on "my bad". I would much rather hear "no problem" than my bad.
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  4. #364
    FORT Fogey Ellen's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3425929;
    Oddly, the "no problem" doesn't bother me (and I will admit to having said it a time or two...or two thousand ). This may be because the words in French and Spanish for you're welcome "de rien" and "de nada" essentially mean "it's nothing", so I just consider the "no problem" to be the English equivalent.
    Same here -- I've studied both languages (French as part of a German and French double major) and work with French speakers every day, so "no problem," for me, is the same as saying "de rien." In the past, acceptable ways of responding to "thank you" in standard English were "not at all" and "don't mention it." "No problem" is just part of the natural linguistic evolution.
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  5. #365
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by queenb;3425924;
    We don't hear that in this area; instead, it's "no problem" or 'not a problem' as an answer to "thank you" instead of "you're welcome"or even when you finish placing an order in a restaurant or otherwise require paid help.
    Statement: "I need an oil change and new wiper blades.
    Reply: "no problem. "

    I certainly hope I'm not troubling you with my business, doofus!
    Wait, in that example, why is "no problem" a...uh...problem? In that sort of situation, I've always considered "no problem" to mean "sure thing, be happy to help you with that".

    If "no problem" was truly such a problem for people, I think it's a wonder I have any friends left.

  6. #366
    A Meat Loaf Aday... ClosetNerd's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    I don't have a problem with "no problem" because yes, sometimes people ask for things that ARE a problem
    If I ask for something, I like to be made to feel I am not being a bother, or that my request is delightfully reasonable.
    It makes me feel like they are happy to help and/or we're on the same level in some way.

    When people reply to me with more "proper" replies I am often left with the feeling that
    the other party is being begrudgingly accommodating, robotic or (unnecessarily formal for the situation)
    I get uncomfortable when people waste formalities on me.
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  7. #367
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by norealityhere;3425966;
    I think the "no problem" response to thank you shows how much we have bast**dized the English language until it is almost unrecognizable. TV programs now regularly say "my bad" when a character makes a mistake or an error. Why can't they just talk in simple English? Why the need to speak in text language?
    Sorry, but as an English major, it is absolutely appalling to me to see what is happening to our language. When I was growing up, I used to study the dictionary on a regular basis in order to strengthen my vocabulary. Nowadays, I guess people want to appear to be as average and mediocre as they possibly can be. Sadly, they seem to be succeeding.
    While there are many, many, many areas where the corruption of language irks the hell out of me, casual language in an informal setting doesn't bother me at all. Should the queen thank you for the gift of a crystal decanter of maple syrup and a tortiere, a "no problem" just does not cut the mustard. The trouble is many people don't seem to understand situational language usage. This also applies to the accursed "my bad". There is no situation where an insincere apology is acceptable. If you're going to apologize, then apologize and mean it. And honestly, I feel the same way about darn, gosh, frak and the like. If you're going to swear, then swear.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  8. #368
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;3425929;
    Oddly, the "no problem" doesn't bother me (and I will admit to having said it a time or two...or two thousand ). This may be because the words in French and Spanish for you're welcome "de rien" and "de nada" essentially mean "it's nothing", so I just consider the "no problem" to be the English equivalent.
    I say it all the time, too, but I also say "no worries", sorry Rattus. I really don't know where I picked it up from. I agree that the setting and situation makes a difference. Slang has always been a part of the English language and it changes constantly, plus it's always a part of casual conversation. If you're writing an essay for Lit class or composing a business document, then speak the Queen's English and use your spell and grammar check. Otherwise, chillax. (One of my older daughter's current favourite words.)

    I guess I'm alone in this but I love hearing about all the regional and cultural differences in language. It's part of what makes different areas of the nation (I'm including Canada in with the U.S.) unique. Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer wouldn't have been the same without the Southern vernacular. Tony Soprano wouldn't have sounded authentic without the accent, mangled grammar and bad language. And don't get me started on the pidgin English/French that you hear in parts of the provinces of Manitoba and New Brunswick.

    Having said all that, I don't like "my bad" used in a flip manner when a sincere apology is called for. Mind you, my brother is a linguist and I've caught him saying "my bad".
    Last edited by AJane; 04-28-2009 at 10:48 AM. Reason: grammar ;)
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  9. #369
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by AJane;3426893;
    I say it all the time, too, but I also say "no worries", sorry Rattus. I really don't know where I picked it up from.
    No worries . I don't have an issue with "awesome", a word the useage of which has inspired many a cranky newspaper article. If we were all irritated by the same thing, there just wouldn't be enough irritants to go around.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  10. #370
    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: The Grammar discussion

    If our language didn't evolve, over time, it would be just like Latin.....DEAD!
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

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