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Thread: Grammar

  1. #211
    FORT Fan dcamonkeys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HottieP;507647;
    I am a grammar nazi, or so I have been told. I am also a spelling nazi. Is there anyone here that is?
    I saw this thread title on the front page, and because I am a huge grammar and spelling nazi, I had to investigate. I have a hard time not correcting people when they make mistakes that aren't typos. I really hate "would/could/should of", and "I seen". It also annoys me when people can't differentiate between homonyms.

    I'll have to go back and read the whole thread. Somehow, commiserating with others makes my pain more bearable. LOL

  2. #212
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArchieComic Fan;2250879;
    That's another tricky one. Sometimes it sounds right to use "I" instead of "me" or vice versa, but it's actually the other. I think (and someone please correct me if I'm wrong) if you say "He gave money to Sandra and me" then you're using it right because you can eliminate the other person and have the correct usage. And you would say "Sandra and I are going to the store" (instead of Sandra and me) because you could drop "Sandra" and say "I'm going to the store." I think that's right. I still get confused sometimes.
    You are completely correct .
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  3. #213
    muddy amna's Avatar
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    I have several years teaching experience as an English Language teacher at the Grade 6 level & I can spot grammatical & spelling mistakes easily.I'm also in the habit of correcting spoken English.It drives my husband nuts.
    One example, the word "hair" is a collective noun so it should be used as singular & not plural. Lots of people do use the word as plural . e.g. "My hair(s) are pulled back" It's hair is, not hair are!
    I'm presently living in a country where English is spoken as a second language & a few years back was marking some class tests when I came across the following. The student had to make a sentence using the word "useless" so he wrote :
    I useless my pencil now that I have a pen.
    Go figure! Has me laughing to this day.

  4. #214
    FORT Fogey ScoutMom's Avatar
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    Years ago (and I mean YEARS ago), at work we would periodically get a newspaper-type thing. I forget what the point of the newspaper thing was, but included in it was a grouping of funny ways that people worded accident reports. I would be laughing so hard, I'd have tears rolling down my face. It would be stuff like - "I swerved all over the road and hit the tree". Ah yes, those were the good old days. . .

  5. #215
    MRD
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    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
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    I'll never forget a friend that sent out an email to several of us telling us about her vacation and they went "tubbing" behind her dad's boat.

    All I could picture was her in a bathtub being towed behind a boat.

    Another one that got to me (in more ways than one) was a woman on the Disney World Vacation Discussion Group on Yahoo who was asking if Disney had people that would go on the rides with her 13 year old "retarted" son as she didn't ride. I'm sorry, I know its wrong, but all I could envision was this giant pop tart with arms and legs riding the teacup ride at Disney.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  6. #216
    FORT Fogey cricketeen's Avatar
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    Well, you have a nicer mind than I do. I envisioned him with bright red lipstick and sky blue eyeshadow, false eyelashes.... You get the picture.
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough." - Mario Andretti

  7. #217
    FORT Fogey famita's Avatar
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    MRD, I went tubing this past summer, but it sure looked as if I went tubbing. I think my little sister and her friends were shouting "beached whale"! lol. I guess some of it is perception. Some misspellings are meant to be!

  8. #218
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    The book I am reading keeps using "disorientated." Urgh! That is not a word! It is "disoriented"! :nono

    That's a huge peeve of mine, along with "irregardless." No. It is "regardless." Irregardless would be redundant.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  9. #219
    Crabby Cancerian remote_goddess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy;2256906;
    The book I am reading keeps using "disorientated." Urgh! That is not a word! It is "disoriented"! :nono

    That's a huge peeve of mine, along with "irregardless." No. It is "regardless." Irregardless would be redundant.
    Errr, disorientated is a word, at least according to dictionary.com... It means "to disorient".

    Now, I personally think it sounds "off", but since orientate is a word, I thought I'd see if this was, too, and it is.

    Sorry.

  10. #220
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
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    Even dictionary.com thinks it's a "silly variant".

    Link.

    Is orientate interchangeable with orient?

    Orient is the word to use; orientate is a silly variant. Orient means (literally) 'to turn and face the east' and 'to locate east and so adjust to the compass directions' and (figuratively) 'to put oneself in the right position or relation' and 'to set right by adjusting'. The longer variant, a back-formation from orientation, seems to prevail in common figurative use and has existed since around 1849. This has unfortunately also given rise to disorientated when the historically correct form is disoriented.

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