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Thread: The Ultimate Best Picture

  1. #71
    FORT Fan ev700's Avatar
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    Boot ON the waterfront

    Gandhi (1982)
    My Fair Lady (1964)
    West Side Story (1961)
    Around the World in Eighty Days (1956)
    Marty (1955)
    From Here to Eternity (1953)
    All About Eve (1950)
    All the King's Men (1949)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
    Best Years of Our Lives, The (1946)

  2. #72
    FORT Fan ev700's Avatar
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    Boot around the world in eighty days

    Gandhi (1982)
    My Fair Lady (1964)
    West Side Story (1961)
    Marty(1955)
    From Here to Eternity (1953)
    All About Eve (1950)
    All the King's Men (1949)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
    Best Years of Our Lives, The (1946)
    Last edited by ev700; 07-24-2005 at 11:00 AM.

  3. #73
    FORT Fan ev700's Avatar
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    Top 9 Movies

    Gandhi (1982)

    The acclaimed dramatization of the life of Mohandas "Mahatma" Gandhi, from his beginnings as a South African-educated lawyer through his historic, galvanizing struggle to free India from British Colonial rule. With a large, distinguished cast, headlined by Ben Kingsley in a nuanced performance, Sir Richard Attenborough's biopic is a classic of the genre. Academy Award Nominations: 11. Academy Awards: 9, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor--Ben Kingsley, Best (Original) Screenplay.My Fair Lady (1964)

    My Fair Lady (1964)

    A priceless classic, MY FAIR LADY has become one of the most popular musicals of all time. Based on George Bernard Shaw’s 1913 play PYGMALION, the film swept the Academy Awards. Cecil Beaton’s lavish sets and costumes and Lerner and Loewe’s winning score became the background for George Cukor’s striking mix of styles that ranged from the fantastic to the abstract in his telling of the tale of a waif who’s educated into being a lady. Egotistical linguist Professor Henry Higgins (Oscar-winning Rex Harrison) bets his friend, Colonel Hugh Pickering (Wilfrid Hyde-White), that he can transform Cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle (Audrey Hepburn) in time for an important society ball. His gamble could pay off--but the spirited Eliza is more of a handful than the Professor could have predicted. As she slowly becomes more refined, and less reliant upon him, Higgins realizes, to his confusion, that he can’t live without her. The film was nominated for 12 Oscars and won eight, including Best Picture and Director.


    West Side Story (1961)

    This romantic musical update of 'Romeo and Juliet' won ten Oscars. The tale of a turf war between rival teenage gangs in Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen and the two lovers who cross battle lines has captivated audiences for four decades. The Stephen Sondheim/Leonard Bernstein score is just one of the reasons.


    Marty(1955)

    Delbert Mann's big-screen remake of Paddy Chayefsky's 1953 teleplay, one of the most successful works of film's Golden Age, stars Ernest Borgnine as Bronx butcher, Marty Piletti. A good-natured man, if plain and overweight, the 34-year-old bachelor has become fed up with the dreariness of life with vacant, dead-end friends like Angie (Joe Mantell), omnipresent relatives like his cousin Tommy (Jerry Paris), and his nagging mother, Theresa (Esther Minciotti), with whom he shares a house. Often rejected by women, he feels that he is too unattractive to marry, and is far from eager to endure further humiliation. Still, Marty finds himself at a local dance hall, where he angrily refuses a man who offers him a few bucks to take home a blind date who has turned out to be a dog. The butcher seeks out the humiliated woman, Clara (Betsy Blair), who's in tears, and after he comforts her, they return to the dance. As Marty confesses similar experiences of his own to Clara, he realizes that he may have found the woman he's been looking for. Influenced by neo-realist masterpieces like UMBERTO D, Chayefsky's poignant, brilliantly observed kitchen-sink drama remains as persuasive as ever, as it explores the universal need to give and receive love.



    From Here to Eternity (1953)

    An all-star cast brought what was considered an unfilmable novel to the screen with skill and grace with this story of the loves, hopes and dreams of those in a close-knit Army barracks in Hawaii shortly before the attack on Pearl Harbor. Montgomery Clift portrays a former boxer who refuses to fight after blinding a friend in the ring and is sent to the remote outpost as punishment for his insubordination. Love and tragedy abound in this unflattering look at military life and American thought before the war. Based on the novel by James Jones.


    All About Eve (1950)

    Jealousy, manipulation, and betrayal unfold in this tour de force drama of an ambitious wannabe who sets her sights on stealing the spotlight from legendary stage actress Margo Channing. Insecurities and designer gowns abound as Margo desperately tries to hold onto her friends and career.


    All the King's Men (1949)

    Broderick Crawford stands out in this fine drama about the rise and fall of a corrupt southern governor who promises his way to power. Crawford portrays Willie Stark, who, once he is elected, finds that his vanity and power lust prove to be his downfall. The film is based on the 1946 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Robert Penn Warren, which in turn was based largely on the story of Louisiana legend Huey Long. Directed by Robert Rossen (THE HUSTLER.) Academy Award Nominations: 7, including Best Director, Best Screenplay. Academy Awards: 3, including Best Picture, Best Actor--Broderick Crawford, Best Supporting Actress--Mercedes McCambridge.


    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

    The best of the few Hollywood treatments of anti-Semitism. Gregory Peck gives the right gravity to his role of a magazine reporter who comes to understand in a personal way the barriers imposed by prejudice when, to add depth to his magazine feature, he takes on a Jewish identity. Hart wrote the script, based on the novel by Laura Z. Hobson.


    Best Years of Our Lives, The (1946)

    Perhaps the most memorable film about the aftermath of World War II, it unfolds with the homecoming of three veterans to the same small town. The leads all touch emotional truths: Loy seems able to express longing, joy, fear and surprise - mostly with her back turned - in a particularly poignant welcome home. The movie never glosses over the reality of altered lives and the inability to communicate the experience of war on the front lines or the home front. A landmark achievement. WWII vet Russell, who lost his hands in the war, is the only person to win two Oscars for the same role, Best Supporting Actor and a special Oscar "for bringing hope and courage to his fellow veterans through his appearance."
    Last edited by ev700; 07-24-2005 at 11:06 AM.

  4. #74
    FORT Fan ev700's Avatar
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    I have to boot From here to Eternity

    Gandhi (1982)
    My Fair Lady (1964)
    West Side Story (1961)
    Marty(1955)
    All About Eve (1950)
    All the King's Men (1949)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
    Best Years of Our Lives, The (1946

  5. #75
    FORT Fan ev700's Avatar
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    Boot Gandhi

    My Fair Lady (1964)
    West Side Story (1961)
    Marty(1955)
    All About Eve (1950)
    All the King's Men (1949)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
    Best Years of Our Lives, The (1946

  6. #76
    I Bleed Scarlet And Gray FireWoman's Avatar
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    Boot Marty

    My Fair Lady (1964)
    West Side Story (1961)
    All About Eve (1950)
    All the King's Men (1949)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)
    Best Years of Our Lives, The (1946

  7. #77
    FORT Fogey Namaste's Avatar
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    Boot The Best Years of Our Lives

    My Fair Lady (1964)
    West Side Story (1961)
    All About Eve (1950)
    All the King's Men (1949)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

  8. #78
    FORT Fan ev700's Avatar
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    Boot West Side Story

    My Fair Lady (1964)
    All About Eve (1950)
    All the King's Men (1949)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

  9. #79
    I Bleed Scarlet And Gray FireWoman's Avatar
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    Boot All the King's Men

    My Fair Lady (1964)
    All About Eve (1950)
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

  10. #80
    FORT Fan ev700's Avatar
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    boot all about eve

    I'm going to give the Final 2 movies 10 points. If you boot one, take 2 points off.

    My Fair Lady (1964) 10
    Gentleman's Agreement (1947) 10

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