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Thread: How did you learn to cook?

  1. #41
    Kitten time! Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Re: How did you learn to cook?

    My chef daughter made a gravy one thanksgiving that took 3 days. First she roasted turkey legs, then stewed them with aromatics, then strained and reduced that liquid, and combined it with the actual turkey drippings and whatever else. It was seriously one of the best things I've ever put in my mouth.
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  2. #42
    Red Sox Nation Brooks's Avatar
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    Re: How did you learn to cook?

    I'm not sure I ever did learn to cook, as far as that meaning technique. In recent years, as I have been trying to eat more healthily and cook from scratch I have been exploring ways to make the food more tasty, because I'm challenged with an ok sense of taste but no sense of smell and no tolerance for hot spices. So it's been trial and error but I have settled in with a number of flavor options that are working for me. What I cook makes perfect sense to me but I suspect others might be horrified. ;^)

  3. #43
    Kitten time! Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Re: How did you learn to cook?

    Generally speaking I don't usually "cook" at all. I eat a lot of salads, crockpot soup, roasted veggies, etc.
    Count your blessings!

  4. #44
    FORT Fogey Punkin's Avatar
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    Re: How did you learn to cook?

    It's all about the fat drippings from the roast. Now days it's harder to find, say, a leg of lamb without a lot of fat trimmed off. We go to a specialty butcher and tell them what we want. Because, no fat, no drippings. With turkey, pork shoulder or rump, chicken, beef, or lamb it's all the same - take the drippings and add flour to make a roux, add water or beef /chicken broth until you can whisk a creamy lump free gravy. I only add salt and pepper and always add just a bit of Kitchen Bouquet for a richer color. (Instead of plain water I use the water I used when boiling the potatoes for mashing.) It's all about the meat drippings to get the flavor. I have never used any pre-made canned gravy ( ) or packaged gravy mix. It's that easy, Pik!
    Lynda

  5. #45
    FORT Fogey candor's Avatar
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    Re: How did you learn to cook?

    Bones add a lot of flavor, too. I like old-fashioned pot roast made from chuck roast cooked low and slow. It's hard to find bone-in chuck roast these days, so I buy some neck bones, brown them, and toss them in the pot. It makes a huge difference.
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