+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 47

Thread: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

  1. #31
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Among the flowers
    Posts
    1,403

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Quote Originally Posted by VelvetRed;3751979;
    I would love to read your recipe.

    I haven't made any in quite a while, but the chicken was sliced for meat servings or sandwiches, or cut into small pieces to add to casseroles and other dishes.

    Now, I would probably use black pepper, bay leaves, and maybe some onions, carrots and celery. Since I prefer white meat, I use chicken breasts, bone-in, but of course there is no reason not to use dark meat plus bones, or even just the bones. Dark meat is frequently on sale in my area, usually in large packs, so it would be easy to divide into portions and freeze for future stock options (LOL).

    Velvet -- I'll put it up later today or tomorrow. Zipping out of here now.

  2. #32
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Among the flowers
    Posts
    1,403

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Sorry this has taken me so long to put up. I made this with chicken the other day. Substitute about a cup of finely diced cooked chicken and a chicken carcass for the meat. This has no sodium to speak of.

    Simple Meat Stock - makes about 6 cups

    To make ahead: The cooled stock can be covered and refrigerated for 3 days or frozen in small portions for up to 3 months.

    2/3 lb. very lean ground beef or minced (uncooked) meat
    1 tbsp. unsalted butter or neutrally flavored oil
    1 large onion, cut into chunks (@ 2 cups)
    1 cup coarsely chopped root vegetables, such as celeriac, parsnips and/or carrot
    1 bay leaf (didn't have one so I used McCormick's salt free all purpose seasoning blend)
    6 cups boiling water

    Preheat oven to 200 degrees. Heat a large oven proof pot (with a tight fitting lid for later) over high heat. Add the meat and sear uncovered for a few minutes, just until golden brown. This browning will give the stock a deep, rich flavor. Add the butter or oil, then the onion and root vegetables; sear for a couple of minutes, stirring, until they pick up some color. Add the bay leaf and water, and mix well.

    Cover with the lid and transfer to the oven. Cook for 3 to 4 hours, or up to overnight. To ensure that maximum flavor is extracted, process the stock in a blender in batches (with the center knob removed and a towel put over the opening to prevent steam from causing the blender lid to pop off) or food processor after the stock has cooked for 1 hour. **

    Line a strainer with several layers of cheesecloth or a clean kitchen towel. Strain the stock, extracting as much liquid as possible. Discard the solids. Cool to room temperature; remove any fat or impurities that collect. Cover and refrigerate, or portion into small amounts and freeze.

    ** I misread the directions and cooked it for 3 hours, then let it cool for one hour and then strained it. However, on rereading this, I think they meant "cooled" instead of "cooked." Not really sure.

    From The Washington Post Food Section - date unknown

  3. #33
    Dreamer VelvetRed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    In Wonderland
    Posts
    3,138

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Quote Originally Posted by Columbia, MD;3753661;
    Sorry this has taken me so long to put up. I made this with chicken the other day. Substitute about a cup of finely diced cooked chicken and a chicken carcass for the meat. This has no sodium to speak of.

    Simple Meat Stock
    Thanks!

    I was surprised to see stock made of ground beef; never woulda thunk it.

    A while back I saw a high sodium cooking practice on a few cooking shows. I was shocked to see: covering a roast completely with salt (about 1 inch thick) and baking it, and then cracking the hardened salt "cocoon" open to get the meat out to serve.

    I was initially intrigued by brining a turkey or other bird, the trend for a while now (apparently) for holidays. Obviously, brining involves mucho salt. I guess I was sucked in by the rave reviews of those who do brining (or the media coverage).

    An aside...potato chips do not need to have salt to be tasty. I stopped having them on hand years ago, but occasionally indulge in the salty ones, and I love the unsalty ones.
    The Bachelor/Bachelorette series is a soap opera with unskilled actors, bad writing, and beautiful locations...it even edits the real moon!

  4. #34
    FORT Fogey TripleGemini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lynn, MA
    Posts
    2,189

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    A while back I saw a high sodium cooking practice on a few cooking shows. I was shocked to see: covering a roast completely with salt (about 1 inch thick) and baking it, and then cracking the hardened salt "cocoon" open to get the meat out to serve.
    Actually, if everything is done correctly, the food won't be salty...many recipes say to season the protein before encasing it in the salt/salt crust. But you have to be sure to use a coarse salt (like kosher) and not table salt.

  5. #35
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Among the flowers
    Posts
    1,403

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Quote Originally Posted by TripleGemini;3754433;
    Actually, if everything is done correctly, the food won't be salty...many recipes say to season the protein before encasing it in the salt/salt crust. But you have to be sure to use a coarse salt (like kosher) and not table salt.


    Triple Gemini and Velvet Red -- The thought of all that salt makes me cringe. Even before I knew I had CKD I would never have thought to brine anything.
    Hope the recipe works for you.

  6. #36
    Dreamer VelvetRed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    In Wonderland
    Posts
    3,138

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Quote Originally Posted by Columbia, MD;3754483;
    Triple Gemini and Velvet Red -- The thought of all that salt makes me cringe. Even before I knew I had CKD I would never have thought to brine anything.
    Hope the recipe works for you.
    Columbia, me too (cringe).

    Triple, if the meat won't be salty, then what is the purpose of the salt crust? Possibly a heat/cooking effect (oven within an oven)? The chefs I saw didn't put any barrier between the salt and the meat, so I figured it would leach into the meat. Or, maybe the meat would be dry as the juices would be absorbed by the salt. In any case, I wouldn't want to use those juices for gravy.

    Columbia, thanks for the stock recipe! I'm recording Julia and Jacques making chicken stock. Those shows are somewhat old. When I saw Julia sauteeing the neck with the giblets, I couldn't help but think about how for years, I have discarded the neck due to the scare factor of how that is where the injections are given. But who knows, she may have been using organic meat.

    I'm guessing Julia sauteed the meat for the "carmelization" factor--I've never done that when I've made stock (yet). But maybe she was going to use the sauteed meat for gravy, not stock. Yeah, I should watch the whole episode first!
    The Bachelor/Bachelorette series is a soap opera with unskilled actors, bad writing, and beautiful locations...it even edits the real moon!

  7. #37
    FORT Fogey TripleGemini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lynn, MA
    Posts
    2,189

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Triple, if the meat won't be salty, then what is the purpose of the salt crust? Possibly a heat/cooking effect (oven within an oven)? The chefs I saw didn't put any barrier between the salt and the meat, so I figured it would leach into the meat. Or, maybe the meat would be dry as the juices would be absorbed by the salt. In any case, I wouldn't want to use those juices for gravy.
    It's a cooking method, Velvet. Because coarse salt doesn't dissolve quickly, it creates a crust around the meat that helps the meat retain its moisture because it regulates the heat. After taking the meat out of the oven, it needs to sit for awhile (typically one-half to an hour). Then you crack the crust and throw it away, and eat the meat :-)

    I've been low-salt for what feels like forever (30 years), but I'm forever playing with recipes and cooking/baking to see how far I can go. My body knows when I've had too much salt, so the worst that usually happens is that I don't eat the protein and stick with the sides.

  8. #38
    Dreamer VelvetRed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    In Wonderland
    Posts
    3,138

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Quote Originally Posted by TripleGemini;3754558;
    It's a cooking method, Velvet. Because coarse salt doesn't dissolve quickly, it creates a crust around the meat that helps the meat retain its moisture because it regulates the heat. After taking the meat out of the oven, it needs to sit for awhile (typically one-half to an hour). Then you crack the crust and throw it away, and eat the meat :-)
    Makes sense, thanks!
    The Bachelor/Bachelorette series is a soap opera with unskilled actors, bad writing, and beautiful locations...it even edits the real moon!

  9. #39
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Among the flowers
    Posts
    1,403

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Quote Originally Posted by VelvetRed;3754383;
    Thanks! ......................


    An aside...potato chips do not need to have salt to be tasty. I stopped having them on hand years ago, but occasionally indulge in the salty ones, and I love the unsalty ones.

    VelvetRed- Trader Joe's has some tortilla chips with flaxseed which are low in sodium. Also some veggie chips which are delicious and also low in sodium.
    One of these days I will read the print off the labels!! Gotta do what you gotta do.

  10. #40
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Among the flowers
    Posts
    1,403

    Re: Low-Sodium Recipes and Hints

    Quote Originally Posted by TripleGemini;3754558;
    ............................

    I've been low-salt for what feels like forever (30 years), but I'm forever playing with recipes and cooking/baking to see how far I can go. My body knows when I've had too much salt, so the worst that usually happens is that I don't eat the protein and stick with the sides.

    Me, too, as you know. My body reacts by my ankles and feet puffing up real bad and then out come the heavy-duty diuretics. I ate out three times this week (the social season has begun, I'm afraid) and as careful as I was, I still am paying the price. "No free lunch" in this world.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.