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Thread: Cookbooks and Food magazines

  1. #81
    Just Left of Reality tbamom's Avatar
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I am a cookbook addict but I seem to only use the same 4 or 5 consistently. A very old copy of Farm Journal's country cookbook
    Plenty, Charmaine Solomon's Complete Asian and a book of recipes I have compiled using trial and error. I also have my great granny's hand written recipe box from the 40s that I dip into fairly often.
    That was a great message! And I've had a terrible day, so thank you.I love random acts of kindness.Really, realy appreciated.Scott- RIP SDL<3

  2. #82
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I love it....

  3. #83
    Red Sox Nation Brooks's Avatar
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I hope this is an appropriate thread to post this rather than starting a new one. I have been inhaling whatever I can find on nutrition through our extensive regional library system, most recently on micronutrients. There were a couple of standouts I’d like to recommend. I think either would make a terrific holiday present, and the second one is available used online for the cost of just shipping. I only have so many calories to work with, and my goal is to satisfy my nutritional needs to the maximum extent I can from diet. I have learned and applied a great deal from both these sources.

    Jo Robinson’s Eating on the Wild Side (not yet available in paperback)

    Steven Pratt’s SuperFoods Rx

    Pratt’s book focuses on 14 superfoods but rather than just another annoying superfood list, he discusses each of them as general categories along with related foods, extensive detail about the specific micronutrients, how much a specific food might supply and how you might incorporate that food into your diet, and what he recommends as a goal. In other words, a comprehensive reference work, one I purchased for myself because I couldn’t remotely take enough notes. On top of that, he’s an ophthamologist at Scripps in San Diego so of personal interest to me because of the many genetic eye ailments in my family I’d just as soon avoid if I can.

    Robinson’s book is a terrific aid on selecting foods in the supermarket or farmer’s market or what varieties are most nutritious to grow yourself. It was discouraging to read how much nutrition can evaporate before I even bring produce home. I purchased this book for my most food/cooking knowledgeable friend because I’m sure there is a great deal in the book even my friend isn’t aware of.
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  4. #84
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I was coming here to list Jo Robinson's book.
    I love Eating on the Wild Side. It is so informative. I'm giving it as Christmas gift's. I'd give it 5 stars. You can listen to her NPR podcast and see her article All about Apples on her website eatwild.com. I enjoy her website.
    She has written another book that is good...Pasture Perfect: How You Can Benefit from Choosing Meat, Eggs, and Dairy Products from Grass-Fed Animals.

  5. #85
    Red Sox Nation Brooks's Avatar
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I have been continuing to inhale whatever nutrition books I can obtain through our extensive interlibrary loan system. I want to make special note of one I just finished - Death By Food Pyramid, by Denise Minger. The book does an exceptionally good and very readable job of dissecting the studies and politics behind current dietary policy related to the diseases of affluences, especially heart disease. She's actually a hoot. I couldn't put it down.

    Her takeaway, roughly, is that the modern diets of high carb, low carb, paleo, Mediterranean, etc. all have the potential (based on your genetic tendencies) for being very healthy diets provided the diet follows the commonalities of the successful aboriginal diets - avoid sugar, refined grains and high-omega-6 (polyunsaturated) vegetable oils and be sure to include a very good source of ALL the fat soluble vitamins - A, D, E and K.

    What she has to say about Vitamin K2 in the book and on her blog site - Raw Food SOS | Rescuing good health from bad science. - was the most revealing to me as someone staring down the likelihood of developing osteoporosis. I'm in the home stretch of my annual physical and I think I have finally reached a comfort level as to what amounts of what supplements I should take for what I'm currently eating.

  6. #86
    Red Sox Nation Brooks's Avatar
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Still inhaling nutrition books. Recently finished two I want to gush about. They’re my first foray into reading specifically how to eat with cancer treatment or cancer avoidance in mind. I highly recommend purchasing or borrowing BOTH as companions to each other. They’re available second hand at a good price on Amazon, where you can read further reviews.

    Anticancer: a new way of life by David Servan-Schreiber (2009, Second Edition)

    Foods to fight cancer by Richard Beliveau (2007)


    The books have very readable descriptions of how and why cancer develops and therefore how it might be stopped or prevented. I hadn’t realized our knowledge was this far along. Supposedly we all have cancer - dormant microtumors that could stay dormant for the rest of our lives if we focus on lifestyle basics. Statistically, no guaranty, but we’re not helpless and genetics is not the biggee in developing cancer.

    One of the basics is diet. Turns out many plant-based foods have ingredients that mimic cancer pharmaceuticals in their composition and actions. The authors aren’t recommending that you forego pharmaceuticals if you have developed cancer, but they do stress that you are much more likely to avoid cancer or achieve longterm remission by paying attention to what you eat. Because foods are nontoxic, you can eat them every day. Contrast that to toxic pharmaceuticals like chemotherapy from which you need to take breaks, during which cancer can take hold again.

    Many of our chronic diseases are related and the same general dietary advice tends to apply. These books helped me finetune that effort by discussing the value of specific foods for specific cancers or modes of action, and in some situations how much to consume or how it should be prepared (green tea, as an example). Synergy is important. Choose the whole food and not the supplement. Also certain combinations of food are much more powerful than they would be in the same amounts by themselves. Like broccoli and tomatoes; soy and green tea; turmeric and black pepper (piperine).
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  7. #87
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I ended up buying the Thug Kitchen cookbook (it was discussed in the GD forum, maybe in the Koffee Klatch thread) and have at least a dozen recipes marked already. I'm really looking forward to the white bean and rosemary hummus. I think I'm going to make it this weekend for an event.

    I got a galley of a new book that looks really interesting. I'm only about 10 pages in. It's called The Good Gut. It's about the microbiota (the collective microbes) in our body, mainly our gut, how they affect our overall health and how our processed Western diet has compromised that micribiota. Here's a write up about the authors and the book from The New Yorker:
    The Scientists Who Want to Fix America?s Guts -- Science of Us

    Brooks, after reading several articles on the benefits of turmeric, I started taking a daily supplement. Yes, I could get it from eating Indian food, but even I can't eat Indian food every day!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  8. #88
    Red Sox Nation Brooks's Avatar
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical View Post
    I ended up buying the Thug Kitchen cookbook (it was discussed in the GD forum, maybe in the Koffee Klatch thread)
    I remember the discussions about giving it as a Secret Santa-type gift, LOL. The Amazon reviews for it do look good.

    I got a galley of a new book that looks really interesting. I'm only about 10 pages in. It's called The Good Gut.
    Thanks, it's in my interlibrary loan system so I just bookmarked it for later reading.[/QUOTE]

    after reading several articles on the benefits of turmeric, I started taking a daily supplement. Yes, I could get it from eating Indian food, but even I can't eat Indian food every day!
    Does the supplement contain any piperine or black pepper? If not, then you may be absorbing almost none of it. It may also need a little oil. Or maybe there is some other way of formulating it so it works on its own. Tumeric consistently come up as one of the foremost dietary anti-inflammatories so I'd like to make room for it but I can't tolerate heat. Curry lovers definitely have an advantage.

  9. #89
    Best Buddies Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I use turmeric in my food all the time and it doesn't have heat on its own. I don't tolerate heat, either, but I did have to get used to the earthy taste of turmeric. It also has a rather heavy staining problem if you get it on your counters or fabric. Even when I do use curry, I add extra turmeric because I don't taste it then. I mix turmeric and coconut oil with some crushed saffron on areas of my face where I have sun damage. I only use it if I won't be going out because, again, the staining. Some fresh coconut oil takes it off.
    Count your blessings!

  10. #90
    Red Sox Nation Brooks's Avatar
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    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    There is still the issue that it's very hard to absorb tumeric without both some oil and a lot of black pepper (piperine). The pepper is where the heat comes from. Piperine is something I learned from studying herbal medicines that can be contraindicated if you're on certain pharmaceutical medicines because it does often act to increase absorption rates. That's fine still so long as the resulting dosage isn't too high or you adjust the dosage. Combining with black pepper (which may already be part of the curry) can mean that you absorb 20 or 30 times more tumeric (curcumin) than you would without out. So if you're using turmeric in your food all the time, without pepper, you're getting some and therefore some benefit but perhaps not nearly as much as you thought you were.
    Last edited by Brooks; 04-24-2015 at 02:01 PM.

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