+ Reply to Thread
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 85
Like Tree8Likes

Thread: Cookbooks and Food magazines

  1. #51
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Among the flowers
    Posts
    1,403

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Quote Originally Posted by VelvetRed;3738144;
    What is the title?

    I'm surprised that no one has mentioned "Joy of Cooking" yet; I love it. Explaining the "why's" and not just the "whats" and "hows" is true teaching. My favorite TV chefs share the "why's" (on the shows, rather than just in the pimped cookbook that usually costs at least $35 plus shipping).

    The name of the book is "The New Basic Cook Book." Published by Houghton Mifflin Co. The original copyright date is 1933. Really is a basic cook book but I love the recipes, and there is a lot of text with explanations.

    The Joy of Cooking does explain a lot of things, but except for a few things, I have never cared for the recipes. Too many steps....too much fuss. My husband likes plain food and some of that stuff is not to his liking.

  2. #52
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    52
    Posts
    16,893

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Quote Originally Posted by Harmony2000;3738203;
    My favorite cookbooks are ethnic ones:

    Puerto Rican Cookery (the almond (wedding) cookies in there are AHHHmazing!) I consider this the go-to book for authentic traditional native cookery (cocina criolla). The recipes are easy to follow and most of the ingredients can be obtained from local grocery stores or even wall-mart.

    A Taste of Cuba: Recipes From the Cuban-American Community - There is a traditional Cuban soup in there called Ropa Vieja that is just so dang good! There are also neo-traditional recipes like conch fritters. Another book where the recipes are easy to follow and the ingredients readily available.

    My husband prefers what I call high brow cookbooks, those with fancy ingredients and that contain 250 items and take days to make (not really but might as well! LOL). To add to his collection he wants Kneadlessly Simple: Fabulous, Fuss-Free, No-Knead Breads (an artisan bread book). Two Alton Brown books (Feasting on Asphalt: The River Run and Good Eats: The Early Years) and the Guy book (DDD).

    I haven't been very impressed with most of the books put out by the Food Network Celebrity Chef. They are too....uh...."full of themselves" is the best way to put it. I like simple recipes with easy to find ingredients that are full of flavor, I'm not trying to impress anybody other than my taste buds when I'm cooking which is why many of their cook books turn me off.
    See if you can find on Amazon the Columbia Resturant cookbook. That restuarant was started in a Cuban community near Tampa, FL in 1906 (and it's still open and still going strong) and the recipes are FABULOUS. BEST Gazpacho ever. Paella to die for. And their 1906 salad can't be beat.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  3. #53
    Crazy Shutterbug Harmony2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4,163

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Thanks for the tip, myrosiedog, I found it online at Barnes & Nobles and will go see if they have it in the store. It's cheaper at Amazon and I'll buy it there if I like it but I like to look over the recipes before purchasing a book. They have it labeled as The Columbia Restaurant Spanish Cookbook. I'll have to ask my grandparents what they think of the place. They are Cubans who live in Tampa, I'm sure they've been there.

    Amazon lets you look inside the book, wow, the list of recipes looks really good. They have three different types of paella and I like that it's in both Spanish and English.

  4. #54
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    52
    Posts
    16,893

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I'm sure they have and there are tons of other good Cuban resturants in Tampa so they may prefer one of those. The Columbia is kind of expensive, but it's a real treat to eat there and they are considered an institution in Ybor City/Tampa. The waitstaff is probably the most fabulous waitstaff I've ever had.
    Anyway, the recipes are great in the book. I have a cousin that is married to a Cuban and HE uses that cookbook, so I get it highly reccomended from someone who knows.

    ETA: the 1906 salad is worth the price of the entire book.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  5. #55
    FORT Fogey TripleGemini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lynn, MA
    Posts
    1,912

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Quote Originally Posted by Columbia, MD;3738106;
    I'll echo your sentiments about Everyday Food. I did get a couple of good recipes out of it, but for me the problem is sodium, and this magazine does not publish sodium grams. For those of us who have to watch their sodium intake, it is very important. They put in the carbs, which is great for diabetics, though.
    I love the recipes that say "add salt and pepper to taste" and then put sodium on the list. Um...if people "salt to taste", there's no way that sodium figure will be correct!

  6. #56
    FORT Fogey Ellen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    6,017

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Quote Originally Posted by TripleGemini;3738755;
    I love the recipes that say "add salt and pepper to taste" and then put sodium on the list. Um...if people "salt to taste", there's no way that sodium figure will be correct!
    I know, huh? If my mom and I made the same recipe with "salt to taste," her dish would be outrageously high in sodium, and mine would be outrageously low. I'm not on a low-sodium diet, but since hypertension (and the related problems subsequently) run in my family, in my 20s I decided that I wouldn't wait until a doctor put me on blood pressure meds and told me to be on a low-sodium diet, so I adjusted my cooking/eating out style. As a result, I'm the only one in my near family in my generation who's NOT on blood pressure meds (or cholesterol-lowering meds, for that matter, either).
    "There's no crying in baseball!"
    -- Tom Hanks, A League of Their Own

  7. #57
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Among the flowers
    Posts
    1,403

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Quote Originally Posted by TripleGemini;3738755;
    I love the recipes that say "add salt and pepper to taste" and then put sodium on the list. Um...if people "salt to taste", there's no way that sodium figure will be correct!

    I NEVER use salt in any recipe, including baking. Don't need it for anything but making bread, which I don't do. I told you on PM where I get my bread, I think.

  8. #58
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Among the flowers
    Posts
    1,403

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Quote Originally Posted by Ellen;3738757;
    I know, huh? If my mom and I made the same recipe with "salt to taste," her dish would be outrageously high in sodium, and mine would be outrageously low. I'm not on a low-sodium diet, but since hypertension (and the related problems subsequently) run in my family, in my 20s I decided that I wouldn't wait until a doctor put me on blood pressure meds and told me to be on a low-sodium diet, so I adjusted my cooking/eating out style. As a result, I'm the only one in my near family in my generation who's NOT on blood pressure meds (or cholesterol-lowering meds, for that matter, either).

    Ellen -- good for you. I'm on both and I eat hardly any fat. Must be in the genes. As for the sodium, we've discussed that adorable little subject.

  9. #59
    FORT Fogey Lil Bit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Iowa
    Age
    55
    Posts
    3,376

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    Quote Originally Posted by Ellen;3738757;
    I know, huh? If my mom and I made the same recipe with "salt to taste," her dish would be outrageously high in sodium, and mine would be outrageously low. I'm not on a low-sodium diet, but since hypertension (and the related problems subsequently) run in my family, in my 20s I decided that I wouldn't wait until a doctor put me on blood pressure meds and told me to be on a low-sodium diet, so I adjusted my cooking/eating out style. As a result, I'm the only one in my near family in my generation who's NOT on blood pressure meds (or cholesterol-lowering meds, for that matter, either).
    I'm like you Ellen. My mother had hypertension and my father had heart disease, so as a result, I grew up not eating a lot of salt, and hardly use it now. My husband, however, will salt things before he even tastes it, which really irritates me. How do you know it needs salt until you taste it? I think he uses too much salt, but he's never had high blood pressure, in fact, his is usually on the low side, so my arguments don't carry much weight with him. I keep trying though.
    History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  10. #60
    Scrappy Spartan Broadway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    18,963

    Re: Cookbooks and Food magazines

    I just picked up The Pioneer Woman's (Ree Drummond) new cookbook. Love her, love her website, love most of her recipes. Yum!!
    Never let the things you want make you forget about the things you have.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.