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Thread: General Food Talk

  1. #2531
    Best Buddies Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    I don't get it... what is in chili if it doesn't have beans? Just meat, tomato sauce and seasonings?
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  2. #2532
    FORT Fogey nennie's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    That is all that is in my chili is the meat seasonings and tomato juice. We call it chili beans here if we put beans in it.

    I use ground pork, sausage and ground beef in mine. I also like to make the chili with beans and put over spaghetti or rice.

  3. #2533
    FORT Fogey livin4reality's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    Beans are so good for you! Any chance to add beans to a dish I will do it lol.

    I'm going to make beef stew in the crockpot today, maybe some french bread and oatmeal chocolate chip cookies. Also, shovel the driveway and do laundry.
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  4. #2534
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    Not even tomatoes most of the time, and never any tomato sauce. It's meat, spices, onion, and peppers cooked into a sauce.
    But here's a better description, although the recipe here isn't what I would do.
    ______________________________ ______________________________ ________________________
    http://http://homesicktexan.blogspot.com/2009/02/more-precise-texas-chili-recipe.html
    Now, I’ve written about chili before and provided you with general guidelines on how I make my chili. I don’t use beans, I don’t use tomatoes but most importantly, I don’t use measurements. It works for me, but can be frustrating if you’ve never made chili and desire more strict instructions.

    So for this batch, I decided to multi-task and wrote down what I was adding to the pot when I made my what I dubbed my seven-chile chili. Of course, there were a couple of mishaps—I added way too many ground cloves in the beginning and accidentally added cardamom instead of coriander during one spice addition. But the best thing about chili is that the longer it cooks, the flavors both deepen and blend into a complex dish where the sum of the bowl is greater than its parts.

    People often ask if my chili is authentic Texas chili. I’ll say yes because I’m a Texan and it’s the chili I grew up eating. Though defining what authentic Texas chili is can be difficult. The term “chili” comes from chile con carne, which translates to peppers with meat. And that’s at heart what I make, with the addition of some spices and aromatics. But there have been some grumbles.

    Some people have grumbled because there’s cinnamon and chocolate in my chili, though these flavors are commonly found in Mexican cuisine. Some people have grumbled because there aren’t tomatoes in my chili, though I don’t think that cowboys on the range had access to tomatoes all the time. And some people have grumbled because I don’t use Gebhardt’s Chili Powder, though I can’t buy that in New York and using fresh chiles will trump chili powder any day.
    ______________________________ ______________________________ ______________________________ _
    These recipes are more like mine. I do use an onion, though. I make my own chili powder in big batches and keep it in the freezer, also. I learned to make chili from a friend who was originally from Amarillo; according to her the proper way to cook chili is a big, big, big deal among Texas cooks. But I agree that I like this type the best. I use the cooking method in the second one--a long time in the crockpot or stewpot, and I don't precook the meat; it will be done!
    ______________________________ ______________________________ ________________________

    Real texas chili

    This classic Texas chili (no beans, no onion, no tomatoes) was created by native Houstonian Carter Rochelle, a professional fund-raiser. Former New York Times food editor Craig Claiborne once pronounced this chili his favorite and published the recipe in two of his cookbooks.

    3 pounds boneless beef stew meat (chuck or round)
    6 ounces beef suet (hard white fat), cut into pieces (see note)
    3 or 4 garlic cloves, crushed
    2 teaspoons salt
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    4 to 6 tablespoons chili powder, or to taste
    8 tablespoons Masa Harina (Mexican corn flour)
    6 cups hot water
    2 tablespoons vinegar
    Red chiles, crushed or dried and chopped, to taste

    Remove gristle and most of fat from meat; cut into 1/2-inch or smaller cubes (some of the beef should be chipped or flaked). Place suet in large skillet or heavy kettle and render it (cook until fat melts). Skim residue off rendered suet; discard residue.

    Add meat to hot fat and saut√ƒ¬© until lightly browned. Add garlic, salt, black pepper and chili powder. Mix well and let seasonings permeate meat a few minutes. Sprinkle in Masa Harina and mix, stirring rapidly until smooth. Add water, vinegar, bouillon and chilies. Reduce heat and simmer until meat is very tender; some of the meat should virtually dissolve into the chili.

    If chili becomes too dry while cooking, add a little water from time to time. Correct seasonings. When done, skim fat from surface. (You can refrigerate overnight and scrape hardened fat off before reheating.)

    Makes 6 to 8 servings.

    NOTE: Because of health concerns, many chili cooks substitute 1/4 cup to 1/2 cup vegetable oil or shortening for rendered beef suet, which is a highly saturated fat.






    Texas Red Chili
    Here ya go. This is the basic recipe. There’s quite a bit of improvisation involved in getting it to your personal tastes. This recipe will give you a fairly spicy pot of chili. Don’t be afraid to experiment.

    4 lbs. of coarse (chili) ground chuck
    6 cloves garlic, chopped
    6 heaping Tb. ancho chili powder
    6 heaping Tb. chipotle chili powder
    6 heaping Tb. cumin powder
    3 Tb. fresh ground black pepper
    2 Tb. dried thyme leaf
    2 Tb. dried Mexican oregano
    2 26 oz. containers of Swanson Beef Stock (NOT broth. Stock.)
    2 12 oz. cans or bottles of good lager beer.
    Salt to taste

    Place the chuck, onions and garlic into a large pot and turn the heat on to medium high. Get the beef rendering and browning, breaking it up as it cooks. Do not drain the fat. Trust me on this. When most of the beef liquid is cooked out, add all the spices and herbs and stir it in. Let it cook some in the fat, but be careful not to scorch the mix. Add the stock and beer, scraping the bottom of the pot. Bring to a boil and set to simmer.

    At this point, you have a choice to make: How “wet” do you want the chili to be? By this, I mean how much fat do you leave in? Remember fat = flavor. You may skim after some simmering time, but I leave it in. As the liquid reduces, it becomes easier to emulsify the fat into the liquid by stirring.

    Simmer slowly for at least 4 hours, adding more water or beer if it gets to thick for your tastes.

    Also, there’s no beans in this recipe. This is old school Texas Red. No tomatoes, either.
    Last edited by queenb; 02-02-2011 at 10:39 AM.
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  5. #2535
    FORT Fogey livin4reality's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    Homesicktexan blog is a really great one. He is the one who taught me to make pork carnitas. So very simple maybe 3 ingredients, but all about technique and they are wonderful.

    Maybe someday I will get up the courage to try a chili recipe like these..
    I very much believe in rescuing animals, not buying them.

    Candice Bergen, on finding her dog, Lois, a terrier/basset hound mix

  6. #2536
    Ellie May SugarMama's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    Quote Originally Posted by Gutmutter;4175921;
    I don't get it... what is in chili if it doesn't have beans? Just meat, tomato sauce and seasonings?
    Never thought about it from that perspective. I think of it as chili and then chili with beans (or chili beans). Chili I put on hot dogs and hamburgers, the beans add protein and make it a main dish. That's just the way I've understood it.
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  7. #2537
    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    I see that some people like to put tomato juice in their chili instead of tomato sauce/puree. I don't guess that's much different than putting tomato puree/sauce and adding water. And I must have tomatoes!
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

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  8. #2538
    FORT Fogey Ellen's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    And for me, chili is a vegetarian dish.
    (Meat is the fatty-splurge extra for special "pig out" occasions.)
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    -- Tom Hanks, A League of Their Own

  9. #2539
    FORT Fogey nennie's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    I have a nephew who is vegetarian and he makes vegetarian chili all the time.

  10. #2540
    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
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    Re: General Food Talk

    I'd definitely try vegetarian chili. I just love chili...period!
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

    When you throw a rock into a pack of dogs, you know which one you hit by the one that yelps!

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