Closed Thread

Thread: Recipes

  1. #3161
    FORT Fogey Muduh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,303
    We had some folks call and ask if they could drop by, since they would be in our neighborhood. Of course I said yes, thn rushed in the kitchen and made the Apple Crisp. It was quite a hit!

  2. #3162
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In the Kat House in Kanada
    Posts
    7,704
    Quote Originally Posted by lambikins
    ...recipes seriously post the wrong baking times..
    lambikins: I've found that there are differences in baking/cooking times for many things depending on what altitude you are at. It seriously affects bread making machines as well.

    Thanks for the super recipes. Pecan Pie is a family favorite although we've never made it. And I never heard of Chocolate Chess Pie. That sounds decadent!
    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  3. #3163
    That's all folks! Unklescott's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Dublin, OH
    Posts
    26,558
    Quote Originally Posted by misskitty View Post
    And I never heard of Chocolate Chess Pie. That sounds decadent!
    Chess pie is a southern tradition. I have not foumd a chess pie in a restaurant yet since living north of the Mason-Dixon line. Chess pie is fantastic. Here's a little background on the history of chess pie from What's Cooking America.
    Chess pies are a Southern specialty that has a simple filling of eggs, sugar, butter, and a small amount of flour. Some recipes include cornmeal and others are made with vinegar. Flavorings, such as vanilla, lemon juice, or chocolate are also added to vary the basic recipe.

    The origin of the name, Chess Pie, is uncertain, but there are plenty of guesses and a bit of folklore surrounding the name. The most probable explanation is
    that since the English lemon curd pie filling is very close to lemon chess pie, and they believe the word “chess” is an Americanization of the English word “cheese,” referring to curd pie. Basically the Chess Pie is a cheese-less cheesecake.

    Some folklore:

    * One explanation suggests that the word is “chest,” pronounced with a drawl and used to describe these pies baked with so much sugar they could be stored in a pie chest rather than refrigerated.

    * Another story is about the plantation cook who was asked what she was baking that smelled so great - “Jes’ pie” was her answer.



    Mid 1700s - From the cookbook Martha Washington's Booke of Cookery, transcribed by Karen Hess:

    To make very good chee[secakes without] cheese curd
    Take a quart of cream, & when it boyles take 14 eggs; If they be very yallow take out 2 or 3 of the youlks; put them into [the] cream when it boyles & keep it with continuall stirring till it be thick like curd. [Then] put into it sugar & currans, of each halfe a pound; ye currans must first be plumpt in faire water; then take a pound of butter & put into the curd a quarter of [that] butter; [then] take a quart of fine flowre, & put [the] resto of [the] butter to it in little bits, with 4 or 5 spoonsfulls of faire water, make [the] paste of it & when it is well mingled beat it on a table & soe roule it out.. Then put [the] curd into [the] paste, first putting therein 2 nutmeggs slyced, a little salt, & a little rosewater; [the] eggs must be well beaten before you put them in; & for [your] paste you may make them up into what fashion you please..."

    1877 - Estelle Woods Wilcox's 1877 cookbook called Buckeye Cookery, she includes a recipe for Chess Pie:

    Chess Pie
    Three eggs, two-thirds cup sugar, half cup butter (half cup milk may be added if not wanted so rich); beat butter to a cream, than add yolks and sugar beaten to a froth with the flavoring; stir all together rapidly, and bake in a nice crust. When done, spread with the beaten whites, and three table-spoons sugar and a little flavoring. Return to oven and brown slightly. this makes one pie, which should be served immediately.
    - Miss J. Carson, Glendale.
    Last edited by Unklescott; 10-05-2006 at 07:53 AM.

  4. #3164
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    running for the border
    Age
    54
    Posts
    6,776
    Quote Originally Posted by ShrinkingViolet View Post
    Queenb, I am really intrigued with your pumpkin pancakes recipe and am planning on making them. My father, the sweet tooth, will love them. Did you use the pecans in yours?

    Mariner, I have eaten that type of salad many times, but I have never made it. Thanks for the recipe; it will be tomorrow's lunch.

    Such an abundance of new recipes since yesterday. Thanks, everyone, for contributing.
    I'm from Georgia, of COurse I used the pecans! They really toast nicely when you sprinkle them on the batter on the gridle, instead of just mixing them in the batter.
    The pancakes were really good, too; I just found this recipe, and it was the first time I'd heard of it. I'll definately make these again.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  5. #3165
    FORT Fogey Brandy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    3,245
    Anyone have some really healthy recipes? I have been feeling under the weather lately - I think it's all the temp changes back & forth here - and am really craving some light foods and good nutrition. You'd think L.A. would offer a cornucopia of same but it's mostly fried foods and so on. And I don't really eat meat (unless rarely and if organic) so probably fruits/veggies more so. Thanks!

  6. #3166
    FORT Fogey cricketeen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,696
    Quote Originally Posted by Unklescott View Post
    Chess pie is a southern tradition. I have not foumd a chess pie in a restaurant yet since living north of the Mason-Dixon line. Chess pie is fantastic.
    Why Unklescott darlin', Ah grew up in Northeast O-hi-o and Ah had Chess pie in a little restaurant in Ak-ron. While Ah agree it is fantastic, it is so sahweet it does tend to make ones teeth hurt.
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough." - Mario Andretti

  7. #3167
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    52
    Posts
    16,893
    Quote Originally Posted by Muduh View Post
    We had some folks call and ask if they could drop by, since they would be in our neighborhood. Of course I said yes, thn rushed in the kitchen and made the Apple Crisp. It was quite a hit!


    Wish I had had the same reaction here. I made it and my family turned their noses up at it. They want PIE, not crisp.

    My daughter picked all the topping off and ate the apples and my husband took one bite and said, he thought it was too sweet and too rich. (that's his standard comment on a lot of things, too rich. He doesn't like "rich" food)

    Since I'm not that huge of an apple fan to begin with, I will have to just keep on making them pie I guess.

    I am definetly going to make Chess pie. Have not had that in AGES!!!!

    It is most definetly a southern "thang" as is pecan pie.
    My family won't eat pecan pie either. So if I make that one, I need to give most of it away so I don't eat the whole thing by myself!
    I'm guessing "Mr. I don't like rich food" won't eat the chess pie either.

    His mom made apple pie and that is what he wants instead of cake for his birthday. He would rather eat apple pie than anything else. believe me, I am sick of apple pie!
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  8. #3168
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,626
    Quote Originally Posted by Unklescott View Post
    Chess pie is a southern tradition. I have not foumd a chess pie in a restaurant yet since living north of the Mason-Dixon line. Chess pie is fantastic. Here's a little background on the history of chess pie from What's Cooking America.
    Mid 1700s - From the cookbook Martha Washington's Booke of Cookery, transcribed by Karen Hess:

    To make very good chee[secakes without] cheese curd
    Take a quart of cream, & when it boyles take 14 eggs; If they be very yallow take out 2 or 3 of the youlks; put them into [the] cream when it boyles & keep it with continuall stirring till it be thick like curd. [Then] put into it sugar & currans, of each halfe a pound; ye currans must first be plumpt in faire water; then take a pound of butter & put into the curd a quarter of [that] butter; [then] take a quart of fine flowre, & put [the] resto of [the] butter to it in little bits, with 4 or 5 spoonsfulls of faire water, make [the] paste of it & when it is well mingled beat it on a table & soe roule it out.. Then put [the] curd into [the] paste, first putting therein 2 nutmeggs slyced, a little salt, & a little rosewater; [the] eggs must be well beaten before you put them in; & for [your] paste you may make them up into what fashion you please..."
    Nice history lesson on Chess Pie, Unklescott. Now THAT cookbook, the Martha Washington one, is one I'd love to add to my collection. I like the fact that it's so accurate that it lists "rosewater" as a flavouring. Way before vanilla took over as the flavouring Queen, rose and orange water where used extensively. I have them as a staple in my pantry because I do a lot of Middle Eastern dishes and they still have not abandoned the flavour.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  9. #3169
    Who Dat lildago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,522
    ShrinkingViolet, I made your Cranberry Chicken last night and everyone loved it. Even my daugher, the picky eater, said it was yummy. I'll definitely be making it again. Thanks!

  10. #3170
    FORT Fogey Muduh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,303
    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog View Post
    Wish I had had the same reaction here. I made it and my family turned their noses up at it. They want PIE, not crisp.

    My daughter picked all the topping off and ate the apples and my husband took one bite and said, he thought it was too sweet and too rich. (that's his standard comment on a lot of things, too rich. He doesn't like "rich" food)

    Since I'm not that huge of an apple fan to begin with, I will have to just keep on making them pie I guess.

    I am definetly going to make Chess pie. Have not had that in AGES!!!!

    It is most definetly a southern "thang" as is pecan pie.
    My family won't eat pecan pie either. So if I make that one, I need to give most of it away so I don't eat the whole thing by myself!
    I'm guessing "Mr. I don't like rich food" won't eat the chess pie either.

    His mom made apple pie and that is what he wants instead of cake for his birthday. He would rather eat apple pie than anything else. believe me, I am sick of apple pie!
    Maybe you should just give him cheese and crackers for dessert. No richness there.

    I haven't made Chess Pie lately either. My son usually does the baking and he makes Chocolate Chess Pie, but not plain. I'm not a big fan of the Chocolate one.

    I have a rule that I've followed for years. I don't cook anything that "I" don't like. If they want something that I don't like, they can cook it themselves or eat it when we eat out.

Closed Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.