Closed Thread

Thread: Recipes

  1. #2781
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,626
    DesertRose: All I can say is !!! I would never take on a project of that magnitude. I give you for that stunningly beautiful cake!
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  2. #2782
    Signed, Sealed, Delivered prhoshay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Right Here, Right Now
    Posts
    25,192
    Adorable cake, DesertRose! I don't think it would have been nearly as adorable without the flowers you added!

    Trust Your Judgment!
    "...each affects the other, and the other affects the next, and the world is full of stories, but the stories are all one." - Mitch Albom, one helluva writer

    When you throw a rock into a pack of dogs, you know which one you hit by the one that yelps!

  3. #2783
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    52
    Posts
    16,893
    I have a picture of the cutest baby door wreath a friend of mine got. Looks like if you were even semi-crafty you could come up with this.
    I will find the "craft" thread and post it.

    OK, now back to recipes. The baked potato thread of last week now has me on a baked potato binge. I have 3 more in the oven right now.

    Have any of you heard of Burgoo? I had this discussion with a friend and we were talking about "Old South" foods. My mom used to make Chicken Perleau (pernounced per-loo) and people look at me like I have 2 heads when I mention this dish. It was basically chicken and rice cooked together and not sure what else she put in it.

    Just thought you foodies might know some recipes for these 2 things.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  4. #2784
    FORT Fogey cricketeen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,696
    I've heard of Burgoo, but never made it. Here is a little story and recipe to entertain you until someone comes through with a recipe that has been test driven:
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=4145256
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough." - Mario Andretti

  5. #2785
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,626
    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog View Post
    Have any of you heard of Burgoo? I had this discussion with a friend and we were talking about "Old South" foods. My mom used to make Chicken Perleau (pernounced per-loo) and people look at me like I have 2 heads when I mention this dish. It was basically chicken and rice cooked together and not sure what else she put in it.
    You're talking about something near and dear to my heart, myrosiedog: vintage, crazy recipes that are rapidly becoming extinct. I have intentionally collected cookbooks from the early 1900's to 1940's that list recipes for Burgoo, Perleau and things like Queen Anne's Lace Jelly, Corn Cob Jelly, Milk Pie, etc.

    For years, I had attended a wonderful Burgoo Festival in Arenzville, Illinois. My ex and I would go camping down there so that's how we found out about it; bascially, the town triples in size for this festival.

    The begin cooking the burgoo in the kinda kettles that you'd see in old cartoons, that cannibals would cook the missionaries in...I mean real WHOPPERS! They begin on Friday, continue cooking on Saturday and serve it up on Sunday. Each time that they add ingredients, they surround the pots with screens, so no one can see what's going inside. The fire burns for over 48 hours and they take shifts in stirring the stew with a canoe paddle!

    It's served up very thick, with almost everything indistinguishable from anything else (kinda a brownish, meaty stew); thick slices of bread and buttered corn on the cob. Is it worth waiting 3 days for? Yeah, if you like those crazy food festivals across America that specialize in blueberries, burgoo or butter.

    This is from the Arenzville website: http://www.burgoo.org/burgoo/burgoo.html

    "What is burgoo?
    Burgoo is a soup made from chicken, beef, and vegetables, cooked for several hours until the flavors have blended and the ingredients have become a thick stew. Arenzville burgoo is cooked in iron kettles over a wood-burning fire, which imparts a special smoky flavor to the soup.

    The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that burgoo was originally a thin gruel or porridge made by sailors in the 17th century. The name may have come from "bulghur," a form of cracked wheat, or "ragout," a French word for a well-seasoned stew. There are many different recipes for burgoo in other parts of the country, but Arenzville burgoo is unlike any other soup you will ever taste. Early versions of the soup were made with wild game such as venison or squirrel, but current state health laws prevent selling soup made from game, so only chicken and beef are used. Today's Arenzville burgoo is made from a secret recipe, handed down over the generations, and the only place you can get this brand of the soup is in Arenzville, Illinois, during the late summer festival."

    This is a great link, filled with burgoo information and loads of links; darn it...now I want a baked potato AND burgoo!!!

    http://www.angelfire.com/ky/burgoo/

    And lastly, myrosiedog, here's a very simple recipe for you to cook up some evening.

    Easy Recipe for Burgoo

    600 pounds lean soup meat (no fat, no bones)
    200 pounds fat hens
    2000 pounds potatoes, peeled and diced
    200 pounds of onions
    5 bushels of cabbage, chopped
    60 ten-pound cans of tomatoes
    24 ten-pound cans puree of tomatoes
    24 ten-pound cans of carrots
    18 ten-pound cans of corn
    Red pepper and salt to taste
    Season with Worchestershire, Tabasco, or A#1 Sauce

    Mix the ingredients, a little at a time, and cook outdoors in huge iron kettles over wood fires from 15 to 20 hours. Use squirrels in season... one dozen squirrels to each 100 gallons.

    (Fall over dead from too much smoke inhalation and from catching 1 dozen squirrels!)
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  6. #2786
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,626
    This quote caught my eye on the Burgoo page; too funny for words...I may actually add it too my signature!

    TOM AND JERRY SOUTHERN STYLE

    Beware! A sudden jolt of this has been known to stop a victim's watch, snap both of his suspenders and crack his glass eye right across... all in the same motion.--COBB.


    Beat 12 eggs very well and slowly add 1 pound of 4X sugar, continuing to beat. For each serving, pour one large jigger of whiskey into a cup. Fill each cup 2/3 full of boiling water; put spoonful of egg mixture on top and a dash of nutmeg and serve. WOW-W! <

    http://www.in1era.com/KatesCandyGlas...tucky%20Burgoo
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  7. #2787
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    52
    Posts
    16,893
    Quote Originally Posted by lambikins View Post
    You're talking about something near and dear to my heart, myrosiedog: vintage, crazy recipes that are rapidly becoming extinct. I have intentionally collected cookbooks from the early 1900's to 1940's that list recipes for Burgoo, Perleau and things like Queen Anne's Lace Jelly, Corn Cob Jelly, Milk Pie, etc.

    For years, I had attended a wonderful Burgoo Festival in Arenzville, Illinois. My ex and I would go camping down there so that's how we found out about it; bascially, the town triples in size for this festival.

    The begin cooking the burgoo in the kinda kettles that you'd see in old cartoons, that cannibals would cook the missionaries in...I mean real WHOPPERS! They begin on Friday, continue cooking on Saturday and serve it up on Sunday. Each time that they add ingredients, they surround the pots with screens, so no one can see what's going inside. The fire burns for over 48 hours and they take shifts in stirring the stew with a canoe paddle!

    It's served up very thick, with almost everything indistinguishable from anything else (kinda a brownish, meaty stew); thick slices of bread and buttered corn on the cob. Is it worth waiting 3 days for? Yeah, if you like those crazy food festivals across America that specialize in blueberries, burgoo or butter.

    This is from the Arenzville website: http://www.burgoo.org/burgoo/burgoo.html

    "What is burgoo?
    Burgoo is a soup made from chicken, beef, and vegetables, cooked for several hours until the flavors have blended and the ingredients have become a thick stew. Arenzville burgoo is cooked in iron kettles over a wood-burning fire, which imparts a special smoky flavor to the soup.

    The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that burgoo was originally a thin gruel or porridge made by sailors in the 17th century. The name may have come from "bulghur," a form of cracked wheat, or "ragout," a French word for a well-seasoned stew. There are many different recipes for burgoo in other parts of the country, but Arenzville burgoo is unlike any other soup you will ever taste. Early versions of the soup were made with wild game such as venison or squirrel, but current state health laws prevent selling soup made from game, so only chicken and beef are used. Today's Arenzville burgoo is made from a secret recipe, handed down over the generations, and the only place you can get this brand of the soup is in Arenzville, Illinois, during the late summer festival."

    This is a great link, filled with burgoo information and loads of links; darn it...now I want a baked potato AND burgoo!!!

    http://www.angelfire.com/ky/burgoo/

    And lastly, myrosiedog, here's a very simple recipe for you to cook up some evening.

    Easy Recipe for Burgoo

    600 pounds lean soup meat (no fat, no bones)
    200 pounds fat hens
    2000 pounds potatoes, peeled and diced
    200 pounds of onions
    5 bushels of cabbage, chopped
    60 ten-pound cans of tomatoes
    24 ten-pound cans puree of tomatoes
    24 ten-pound cans of carrots
    18 ten-pound cans of corn
    Red pepper and salt to taste
    Season with Worchestershire, Tabasco, or A#1 Sauce

    Mix the ingredients, a little at a time, and cook outdoors in huge iron kettles over wood fires from 15 to 20 hours. Use squirrels in season... one dozen squirrels to each 100 gallons.

    (Fall over dead from too much smoke inhalation and from catching 1 dozen squirrels!)
    Wow, you really ARE the Jedi Master of the Fort Recipe thread!

    Thanks for the info and the burgoo recipe. i'll make that and invite the entire FORT over for dinner! My husband hunts, so getting the squirrels should be no problem.

    Now, what do you know about chicken perleau? My mom made it from no recipe and I don't know how to make it.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  8. #2788
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,626
    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog View Post
    Wow, you really ARE the Jedi Master of the Fort Recipe thread!

    Thanks for the info and the burgoo recipe. i'll make that and invite the entire FORT over for dinner! My husband hunts, so getting the squirrels should be no problem.

    Now, what do you know about chicken perleau? My mom made it from no recipe and I don't know how to make it.
    myrosiedog There is nothing I like more than doing research so this was a fun-Fun-FUN thing to take my mind off of more serious *coughroommatecough* issues. And I'm sweating up a storm, living up to that Jedi title!

    First off, "perleau" is a corruption of any of the following words: Pilav, Pilaf, Pellao, Pulao, Pelau, or Pollo. It all is the same description of the same thing: a grain (rice, bulgar or other grain), cooked with various herbs, meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and savory stocks.

    It can be made with ham or chicken or beef. It can be made with meat stock and coconut milk or one or both of these.

    It is almost always refered to as "Low Country Cooking", which I'm guessing is the type of cooking that rural or poorer people made. I found references to it in South Carolina, Tennessee and the Washington D.C. area, but no others, so it seems to be very South East Coastal areas. It was fun reading reports of people eating this dish: words like "pigs feet, warshing up day, and mules" were part of the descriptions.

    There is NO recipe for Chicken perleau, as every single cook made it, rather like burgoo, in their own fashion. But, it always is a meat/grain pilaf; that is the constant.

    Here are two recipes that I found, after an hour of searching the web. I have NO idea if they resemble your mom's recipe at all. The first one uses chicken, the second one uses pork but I'm sure that you could substitute chicken. And NONE of them used squirrels!!!

    Hope this Jedi Master hasn't disappointed you...(said very tongue in cheek!)


    ****************************** ************************
    Oven Cooked Chicken Pelau Recipe #154447

    8 servings
    1 hour 15 min prep
    2 1/2 lbs chickens
    fresh thyme
    1 tablespoon crushed garlic
    1 teaspoon worcestershire sauce
    1 teaspoon soy sauce
    1 tablespoon ketchup
    1 tablespoon kosher salt
    1 tablespoon crushed black pepper
    fresh parsley
    2 cups rice
    1 large yellow onion (chopped)
    1 (13 1/2 ounce) can coconut milk
    2 cups chicken stock
    3 tablespoons vegetable oil
    1/2 cup sugar

    Marinade chicken w/ thyme, soy sauce, parsley, salt, pepper, ketchup, Worceestershire sauce, and garlic at least one hour.
    Heat oil in a large skillet or frying pan. Add sugar and stir until caramelized. Add chicken and thoroughly coat with sugar and sear on all sides.
    Transfer chicken to dutch oven or pot, add rice, stock, coconut milk, onion, cover, and place in oven at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until rice is fluffy and chicken has reached an internal temperature of 170 degrees F. If rice is still crunchy add a little bit of water and let it cook some more.


    http://www.recipezaar.com/154447

    ****************************** *************************

    http://www.oldewestportspice.com/rec...entSource)=190

    Oven-Baked Pork with Rice Perleau

    3 pounds pork tenderloin, 6 slices 3/4 inch thick
    3 tablespoons vegetable oil
    1 medium onion, chopped
    1 small green bell pepper, chopped
    1 small red bell pepper, chopped
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    2 dried New Mexico red chili peppers, crushed (optional)
    1 cup rice, uncooked
    14 1/2 ounce can chicken broth
    1 cup tomato juice
    1/2 teaspoon celery salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    3 teaspoons Olde Westport Sizzlin' Sunset Cajun Spice Blend

    Trim fat from pork tenderloin and cut into six pieces, approximately 3/4 inch thick. Heat oil in large skillet and brown pork well on both sides, remove and set aside. Cook vegetables and rice in same skillet with pan drippings until onions look clear and rice slightly browned. You may need to add more oil. Place vegetable-rice mixture in bottom of cast iron pot (Dutch oven). Place pork tenderloins on top. Blend chicken broth, tomato juice, celery salt, pepper and Olde Westport Sizzlin' Sunset in bowl. Pour mixture over top of pork tenderloins. Place lid on cast iron pot (Dutch oven) and bake in a 350 degree oven for 60 minutes or until liquid absorbed by rice.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  9. #2789
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,626
    Okay, myrosiedog, I'm typing this now because in 20 minutes HOUSE begins so my butt is going to be horizontal and no typing will be forthwith! But, you know you have too many cookbooks when you go on ebay and have to have duplicates of your favourite old texts to have at your city apartment! Oy vay.

    My most treasured cookbook is from 1939 and is called THE UNITED STATES REGIONAL COOKBOOK. It comes from a time when people rarely if ever moved and ethicity was alive and well in every corner of the U.S. I knew that it had two burgoo recipes in it and was I surprised when the one that I had just posted, for the 200 #'s of meat, is taken directly from my cookbook! By the way, that version makes 1200 gallons.

    In addition, on the next page, is a recipe for burgoo that serves 25, a much more "intimate" setting.

    Here it is, myrosiedog. Let me know when I should bake up my Pee-can pie and I'll be right over!

    BURGOO FOR SMALL PARTIES

    2 pounds pork shank
    2 pounds veal shank
    2 pounds beef shank
    2 pounds breast of lamb
    1-4 pound fat hen
    8 quarts water
    3 large potatoes
    3 large onions
    3 large carrots
    2 green peppers
    2 cups chopped cabbage
    1 quart cooked tomatoes
    2 cups canned corn
    2 pods red pepper
    1 cup butter beans (aka Lima beans)
    1 bunch parsley
    4 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
    salt and cayenne to taste (oh, that's SO Southern!)

    Cook meat in boiling water until tender. Remove from liquor. Cool. Remove meat from bones and dice. Pare and dice potatoes, onions and carrots. Remove seeds from green peppers and dice. Combine meat, vegetables and meat stock. Cook until mixture is thick. Season with salt, cayenne and Worcestershire sauce.

    Serves 25.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  10. #2790
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Right behind you
    Posts
    5,063
    for lambikins! You come up with every recipe anyone thinks of. Now I know who to go to when I can't find something!

    I'm heading off to watch "House" too. It's freaking cold tonight so I'll have to get my comforter out!

Closed Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.