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Thread: Recipes

  1. #2741
    From the corner of my eye Jewelsy's Avatar
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    Thanks so much, SV. The frosting won't matter because I don't care much for frosting/icing (way too sweet), plus grandma would serve it with vanilla ice cream. I'm seriously making my mouth water thinking about this right now.

    Thanks again.
    "Among the blind, the squinter rules." ~ Gerard Didier Erasmus

  2. #2742
    MRD
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    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
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    I've also never had a problem with raw eggs. I hear that most of the problem comes from the outside of the shell anyway, so you could wash the egg in soap and water before cracking it.


    We went to the farmers market yesterday. Last night we feasted on
    sliced heirloom tomatos drizzled in olive oil and s&p (never had one of these before and will never buy another kind of tomato now. SO MUCH flavor)

    Fresh pole beans, fresh turnip greens and fresh corn.

    I was in heaven.

    Tonight we are doing specked butter beans and purple limas I bought yesterday.

    Too bad the market ends at the end of the month. The fresh veggies have been DIVINE.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  3. #2743
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog View Post
    I've also never had a problem with raw eggs. I hear that most of the problem comes from the outside of the shell anyway, so you could wash the egg in soap and water before cracking it.
    I couldn't be more relieved to read your post, myrosiedog. I actually considered having my cake recipe deleted because of the raw egg. But, you are correct: the contamination, if there is any there, is on the OUTSIDE of the egg as it passes through the chicken's birth canal. The hen herself, has to be sick to pass a sick egg.

    I guess it's because I grew up on a farm, which is it's own little world, that I'm so conscious of food safety; it was too darn far and expensive to get to a doctor if you did something dumb. We dated everything and washed everything, from fresh meats to eggs, when we were going to use them. We'd have seperate cutting boards for meats and veggies so there was no chance of germs spreading. Anyone who's ever worked in a restaraunt or deli and had to shut it down for the night is very aware of food safety! (ugh...I remember the hour it took to clean the meat slicer at Red Owl!)



    Quote Originally Posted by myrosiedog
    Too bad the market ends at the end of the month. The fresh veggies have been DIVINE.
    By end of month, myrosiedog, do you mean SEPTEMBER??? In Chicago and S.W. Michigan, our Farmer's Markets go until the last weekend of October, so we get all the great pumpkins, mums, and squashes up to Halloween. I loved your description of your recent finds.

    The last several years, our Farmer's Markets have gone WAY beyond fruits and veggies, with Meat Vendor's, Spice Vendor's and even Candle makers; so I guess we now have "The Butcher, The Baker, and The Candlestick Maker! I've never purchased the meats (no real reason why except suspision of the unknown) but the queue for them is amazing! Maybe next year, I'll get less timid and try some steaks.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  4. #2744
    Who Dat lildago's Avatar
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    Actually, there is risk of salmonella infection from raw egg consumption.

    http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/DBMD/disea.../salment_g.htm
    Egg-associated salmonellosis is an important public health problem in the United States and several European countries. A bacterium, Salmonella enteritidis, can be inside perfectly normal-appearing eggs, and if the eggs are eaten raw or undercooked, the bacterium can cause illness. During the 1980s, illness related to contaminated eggs occurred most frequently in the northeastern United States, but now illness caused by S. enteritidis is increasing in other parts of the country as well. Consumers should be aware of the disease and learn how to minimize the chances of becoming ill.

    A person infected with the Salmonella enteritidis bacterium usually has fever, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea beginning 12 to 72 hours after consuming a contaminated food or beverage. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without antibiotic treatment. However, the diarrhea can be severe, and the person may be ill enough to require hospitalization.

    The elderly, infants, and those with impaired immune systems may have a more severe illness. In these patients, the infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and then to other body sites and can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics.
    You can read more about how eggs become contaminated and the risks at the link provided.

  5. #2745
    Premium Member canuckinchile's Avatar
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    Okay, I am getting ready for the big BBQ tomorrow, and am going to do a leg of lamb. I have a huge rosemary bush that has just sprouted new tender shoots. I was going to mix a ton of rosemary and garlic with olive oil, and marinate the leg for most of the day. Does anyone have any other ideas? Thanks!

  6. #2746
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lambikins View Post
    Now, what do we do about the contaminated spinach out there??? Seems like any poor food is turning toxic these days.
    The two times I've been hospitalized for food poisoning was from eating those pre-washed and bagged salads (both were caesar salad mixes, I believe). It was NASTY. There was no link between the two brands--it was about 5 years apart and wasn't part of an epidemic or anything. That didn't stop me from buying other pre-bagged salads later, but with me serving as an incubator now, I'm staying away from things that could make me sick (but let's face it, everything makes me kind of queasy now. I can't wait till I get to the stage where I'm craving something).

    I LOVE caesar salad with the traditional dressing (made with raw eggs), but I won't eat those again till after the baby is born (knock on wood). Does anyone have a good caesar salad dressing that doesn't require raw eggs? I tried one that I found from the Food Network but it tasted runny and horrible.

  7. #2747
    Endlessly ShrinkingViolet's Avatar
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    Canuckinchile, I don't eat lamb, but that marinade sounds wonderful.

    Thanks for that link, Lildago. As you stated, eggs can be contaminated inside as well as outside. I'm just not one to take a risk. I have another link from the USDA that has everything--and more--that you ever wanted to know about eggs.

    http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets...Eggs/index.asp

    Lois, from the USDA fact sheet, this is the recommendation for recipes that call for raw eggs:

    To make a recipe safe that specifies using eggs that aren't cooked, heat the eggs in a liquid from the recipe over low heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture reaches 160 F. Then combine it with the other ingredients and complete the recipe.
    I'd let it cool (put it in the refrigerator) before finishing the recipe, as I don't think you want hot salad dressing. Hope that helps.

  8. #2748
    Being VIP Yardgnome's Avatar
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    Lois, I have a recipe that makes Caeser salad dressing with eggs in it. The recipe tells you to soft boil the egg/eggs and then add to the ingredients. This recipe you take all the ingredients and combine them in a food processor. When its all been mixed there are little bits of the egg in it. Like what SV said if you have a recipe for Caeser dressing that you like I would maybe just cook the egg and then use it. Good luck.

  9. #2749
    On a cupcake mission! Lois Lane's Avatar
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    ShrinkingViolet and Yardgnome, thanks for those tips. I will try that! Thanks so much!

  10. #2750
    FORT Fogey cricketeen's Avatar
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    My grocery sell pasteurized eggs in the shell. The texture of the albumen is slightly different, but I have been told by Caesar lovers that they work just fine.

    Myrosiedog - last night's dinner sounds wonderful!

    Loislane, You probably already know this, but you should avoid soft cheeses, too (because of possible Listeria, I think). Sorry to say it includes bleu and roquefort (two of my favorites).
    "If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough." - Mario Andretti

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