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  1. #2151
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by queenb View Post
    One thing I hate-hate-hate! I started making bread when I was in high school, and did it all the time because my Dad loved it so much, and I found this cool recipe/grid of which ingredients to switch out and in which amounts if you wanted to make different styles of bread, plus it was easy to make up your own new combination yet have it come out great. Well, after not making much bread for quite a while, that old thing is apparently gone forever, unless one of you out there has something like it. If you do and post it here, I would be ever so grateful!
    queenb: You're always so helpful to me and others, finding out information, that I hope THIS is what you're looking for. Thankfully, I have a good network of cooking friends who are manic posters on Food Sites. I copied and pasted your exact question on one of those sites, hoping that one of my Bread-Making Babes knew what you were talking about.

    I got an answer back this morning, and we're both hoping that this is what you lost. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you; it comes from a 1980 pamphlet from a grocery store. I copied and pasted my friends reply to you.

    "The following came from a pamphlet of the same title I picked up in the baking supplies aisle of a Krogers in either Kalamazoo or Battle Creek about 25 years ago. I've used every variation and facet of the instructions and had nothing but success! My faves are the rye breads.

    Unlimited variety from these basic recipes!

    WHITE BREAD: (Basic Recipe)

    2 1/2 cups all purpose flour
    2 pkgs dry yeast (1 Tbsp = 1 Pkg)
    1/4 cup sugar
    1 Tbsp salt

    Lightly spoon flour into measuring cup, level off.
    Combine all above in a large mixer bowl; blend.

    1 cup water
    1 cup milk
    1/4 cup cooking oil

    Heat in a saucepan until very warm (120 to 130F)

    2 eggs, beaten

    Add eggs and liquid to flour mixture.

    Mixing - Blend at low speed until moistened; beat 3 minutes at medium speed. With a wooden spoon, stir in an additional 3 to 3-1/2 cups of flour to form a sticky dough. In bowl or on a floured board, gradually work in 1/2 to 1-1/2 cups more flour, kneading or working in with hands until dough is smooth, pliable and no longer sticky (about 5 minutes).

    Rising - place dough in a greased bowl; cover with a cloth or loose fit lid. Let rise in a warm place until light and double in size, about 45 minutes.

    Shaping and Baking - Punch down dough to remove air bubbles; divide dough into two parts. From dough into desired shapes; place in greased pans according to Shaping and Baking directions (follows). Cover, let rise in a warm place until light and doubled in size, about 30 minutes. Bake at 375=B0F according to shape until loaf sounds hollow when lightly tapped. Immediately remove from pans; cool.

    (If loaf becomes too brown, cover with tin foil during last 10 minutes of baking.)

    WHOLE WHEAT BREAD - (Basic Recipe)

    Follow white bread recipe. After beating with mixer, stir in 3 cups of Whole Wheat flour in stead of white, knead in 3/4 to 1-1/4 cups white flour.

    MEDIUM RYE BREAD - (Basic Recipe)

    Follow White Bread recipe. After beating with mixer, stir in 3 cups medium rye flour instead of white flour. Knead in 1-1/4 to 1-3/4 cups white flour (rye flour dough usually remains slightly sticky). Rye dough should not completely double in size. Add 1 Tbsp freshly crushed Caraway Seeds with rye flour.

    NOTES: At high altitudes (5000 feet plus) - after first rising, punch down dough and then allow to rise a second time in the bowl. Decrease the first (and second) rising periods by 15 minutes each.

    -----

    INGREDIENT VARIATIONS
    (may be used in any of the above basic bread recipes)

    Ingredients stirred in are added with the flour as it is stirred in.

    Honey/Molasses:
    substitute 1/4 cup for sugar. Reduce milk to 3/4 cup

    Brown Sugar:
    substitute 1/4 cup (firmly packed) for the white sugar

    Rolled Oats:
    stir in 1/2 cup

    Wheat Germ:
    stir in 1/2 cup

    Cheese:
    stir in 1 cup shredded Cheddar, American, Monterey Jack or Swiss cheese.

    Herbs and Spices:
    stir in
    1/4 to 1/2 tsp celery seed or dill weed,
    or 1/2 tsp Italian Seasoning,
    or 2 Tbsp minced chives, caraway or sesame seeds

    Onion:
    stir in 1/2 cup, finely chopped.

    Raisins/Chopped Dates or other Dried Fruit: Use Sweet Dough recipe.
    Stir in 1-1/2 cups fruit.

    -----

    SPECIALTY WHITE BREAD VARIATIONS - use Basic White Bread Recipe

    FRENCH BREAD

    Reduce sugar to 1 Tbsp
    Omit milk and eggs
    Use 2 cups water
    Reduce stirred in flour to 1-1/2 to 2 cups.
    Knead in 1/2 to 1 cup flour.
    Increase first rise to 1 hour.
    Shape and bake according to Shaping and Baking directions for a

    French Loaf or Rolls.
    Brush with beaten egg just before baking.

    -----

    RICH EGG BREAD - use Basic White Bread Recipe

    Increase sugar to 1/3 cup
    Decrease water to 3/4 cup
    Use 3 eggs

    -----

    SOUTH OF THE BORDER LOAF - (use Basic White Bread Recipe)

    Decrease sugar to 1 Tbsp
    Decrease milk to 1/2 cup
    Increase stirred in flour to 3-1/2 to 4 cups. With this flour, stir in the following:

    1/2 cup sour cream
    1/2 cup chopped olives
    1/2 cup chopped onion
    1 cup shredded Cheddar or Monterey Jack cheese
    1/4 tsp garlic powder
    1 to 4 TBSP minced green chilies (optional)

    Shape and bake according to directions for regular or round loaves, or rolls.

    -----

    SWEET DOUGH - (use Basic White Bread Recipe)

    Increase sugar to 1/2 cup
    Eliminate water
    Use 2 cups milk
    Substitute butter or margarine for oil

    CINNAMON SWIRL _ (use Sweet Dough Recipe)

    Pat each half of dough into a 7x14-inch rectangle; spread with 1 Tbsp butter or margarine. Combine 1/2 cup sugar and 2 Tbsp cinnamon; sprinkle half of mixture over each rectangle. Starting with the 7-inch side, roll jelly-roll style. Seal all edges tightly. Shape and bake according to instructions for a regular loaf.

    -----

    SPECIALTY DARK BREAD VARIATIONS - follow Whole Wheat or Medium Rye
    Basic Recipes

    DELICATESSEN RYE BREAD - use Basic Med-Rye Recipe

    Omit sugar, water and 1 egg
    For warm liquid, heat 1-3/4 cups milk, 1/4 cup molasses, 1/4 cup cooking oil and 1 square unsweetened chocolate (chocolate does not need to melt).
    Along with stirred in flour at 1 Tbsp Caraway Seed (optional)
    Stir in 1/4 to 1 cup white flour with the rye flour.
    Do let the dough to rise until double. Increase first rise to about 1 hour and the second to about 40 minutes.
    Increase the baking temperature to 400=B0F
    Bake loaves 30-40 minutes.

    HEARTY WHOLE WHEAT LOAVES - use Basic Whole Wheat Recipe

    Substitute 1/4 cup brown sugar for the white sugar.
    Along with the stirred in flour add 1/2 cup each Wheat Germ and
    Rolled Oats and 2 Tbsp Sesame Seeds.
    Decrease kneaded in white flour to 1/4 to 3/4 cup
    Increase first rise to about 1 hour.

    LIGHT PUMPERNICKEL BREAD - use Basic Med-Rye Recipe

    Eliminate sugar
    Decrease water to 3/4 cup
    Heat 1/4 cup molasses with other liquids
    Along with stirred in flour add 2 Tbsp caraway seeds.

    100% WHOLE WHEAT BREAD - use Basic Whole Wheat Recipe

    Eliminate white flour. Stir in 3 to 3-1/2 cups whole wheat flour; knead in a further 1/2 to 1-1/2 cups whole wheat flour.

    ----------------------

    SHAPING AND BAKING

    Use half of dough to make each shape. Using solid shortening, generously grease pans. If desired, just before baking, slash top of loaf in any design using a sharp knife.

    BAKE BREADS at 375=B0F:

    All Loaves - 35 to 45 minutes or until loaf sounds hollow when lightly tapped.

    All Rolls - 10 to 20 minutes.

    Regular Loaf: Use a 9x5 or 8x4-inch loaf pan. Press dough into pan; insert fingers between pan and dough to round edges.

    Round Loaf: Use an 8 or 9-inch round cake pan, 1-1/2 quart round casserole or cookie sheet. Form dough into round ball; flatten slightly.

    French and Oblong Loaf: (Use a large cookie sheet)

    FRENCH: form dough into 14-inch loaf; taper ends.

    OBLONG: form dough into 8 to 10-inch oblong loaf; round ends.

    ROPE SHAPED LOAVES

    Shape half of dough into a 26-inch rope; form into any desired shape described below.

    COIL: Use 8 or 9-inch round cake pan, 1-1/2 quart round casserole or cookie sheet. Beginning at center of loaf, roll rope into snail shape; tuck tail under.

    TWIST: Use a 9x5 or 8x4-inch loaf pan or cookie sheet. Cut rope in half to form two 13-inch ropes. Twist together; seal ends.

    FIGURE EIGHT: Use a 9x5 or 8x4-inch loaf pan or cookie sheet. Form rope into figure-eight; seal ends.

    DOUGHNUT: Use cookie sheet. Form circle by bringing ends of rope together; seal. Flatten circle to 1-1/2 inch thickness.

    ROLLS - (use large cookie sheets)

    ROUND: Form dough into 12 2-inch balls.

    VIENNA: From dough into eight 6-inch oval rolls; flatten slightly.

    BREADSTICKS: Cut dough into walnut size pieces. Roll with hands into 5-inch sticks.

    BREAD GLAZES - use any of the following glazes to create different crusts.

    Soft Buttery Crusts:
    Brush loaves with softened or melted butter or margarine AFTER BAKING.

    Crisp Shiny Crust:
    Brush loaves with a mixture of 1 egg and 1 Tbsp water JUST BEFORE BAKING. May be sprinkled with poppy or sesame seed.

    Delicatessen Crust:
    Remove loaves from oven 5 minutes before done; brush with a mixture of 1/2 tsp cornstarch and 1/4 cup water that has been heated to boiling. Return to oven to finish baking.

    Cinnamon/Sugar Crust:
    Brush loaves with 2 Tbsp melted butter or margarine; sprinkle with mixture of 2 Tbsp sugar and 1/2 tsp cinnamon AFTER BAKING.

    Slightly Crisp, Shiny
    Sweet Crust: Brush loaves with a mixture of 1 Tbsp each of sugar and water AFTER BAKING.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  2. #2152
    giz
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    Okay you foodies; I'm teaching a cooking class (for the first time) and I want to teach them a recipe for chicken with tapenade. I will be them in class how to do chicken in foil, (to eat as a dish on it's own with whatever veggies or salad) if you were doing the chicken and tapenade class, would you feel cheated if we used an already cooked chicken? And should I just buy the tapenade, but give them a recipe for making it from scratch? Should I demo the tapenade (basically you just cut olives up really fine and cook them briefly with anchovies, capers and garlice - it's not difficult). We will be parboiling beans, so there will be some actual cooking involved (plus we're learning pastry the same night; doing a French onion pie).

  3. #2153
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    Quote Originally Posted by giz View Post
    Okay you foodies; I'm teaching a cooking class (for the first time) and I want to teach them a recipe for chicken with tapenade. I will be them in class how to do chicken in foil, (to eat as a dish on it's own with whatever veggies or salad) if you were doing the chicken and tapenade class, would you feel cheated if we used an already cooked chicken? And should I just buy the tapenade, but give them a recipe for making it from scratch? Should I demo the tapenade (basically you just cut olives up really fine and cook them briefly with anchovies, capers and garlice - it's not difficult). We will be parboiling beans, so there will be some actual cooking involved (plus we're learning pastry the same night; doing a French onion pie).
    I would go ahead with the already cooked chicken (that's easy enough) but demo the tapenade. I am a visual learner, so if someone doesn't show me exactly how to do something, I never get it right. (I would have to time how long you cooked it and to see what consistency of the stuff is)Plus, since it sounds pretty easy- it shouldn't take long to do, right?

  4. #2154
    giz
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    True enough, and I don't want the class ending early. I'm a little confused about why some of them are taking the class. It's supposed to be healthy French food (for slimming), yet only one of them is roly poly. Don't know why the rest of them are there. I guess I could ask. That way I'll know whether or not to tone down the dietish aspect and step up the learning to cook aspect. It's going okay (I think!), I was exhausted after, and it pays great. If I could do this, say 4 times a week I'd be rich! Rich I say! Rich! Wouldn't mind being a cooking-mentor to individuals, but I'm not sure if my city is big enough to support such a thing. I'll have to move to Toronto. Kidding! I understand it snows there. Would people pay for such a thing, do you think? Another thought was picnic baskets, but I think that might involve a) alot of paper work for the local health department and b) totally missing out on Mother's Day. Mind you, I think my Mother's Day this year will suck anyway as my husband has left me (and kids) and does not have them on Sunday as it interferes with the sacred soccer match. So maybe driving around making other people's day would be better than sitting at home not being waited on! (and the kids will give me sweet stuff they've made and I truly appreciate that, not to sound like the Scrooge of Mother's Day). Sorry for thread-jack. Will post Russian mushroom pie recipe very soon, I promise!

  5. #2155
    MRD
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    Quote Originally Posted by giz View Post
    True enough, and I don't want the class ending early. I'm a little confused about why some of them are taking the class. It's supposed to be healthy French food (for slimming), yet only one of them is roly poly. Don't know why the rest of them are there. I guess I could ask. That way I'll know whether or not to tone down the dietish aspect and step up the learning to cook aspect. It's going okay (I think!), I was exhausted after, and it pays great. If I could do this, say 4 times a week I'd be rich! Rich I say! Rich! Wouldn't mind being a cooking-mentor to individuals, but I'm not sure if my city is big enough to support such a thing. I'll have to move to Toronto. Kidding! I understand it snows there. Would people pay for such a thing, do you think? Another thought was picnic baskets, but I think that might involve a) alot of paper work for the local health department and b) totally missing out on Mother's Day. Mind you, I think my Mother's Day this year will suck anyway as my husband has left me (and kids) and does not have them on Sunday as it interferes with the sacred soccer match. So maybe driving around making other people's day would be better than sitting at home not being waited on! (and the kids will give me sweet stuff they've made and I truly appreciate that, not to sound like the Scrooge of Mother's Day). Sorry for thread-jack. Will post Russian mushroom pie recipe very soon, I promise!
    Giz,
    They have something in our area called: Dinner done and people go there and make a months worth of meals to put in their own freezer to eat during the month. My cousin goes and RAVES abotu it. Maybe that's something you could do. She says they have all the ingredients out and cut and measured for you and you go from station to station putting together your meals. It's $135 for 8 meals for 6 or 16 meals for 3. I don't think its bad considering she says they have quality ingredients. She goes for 4 hours once a month.
    They do get to learn some cooking techniques and get to take the recipe home as well to make again.
    Here's the website if you are interested:
    www.dinnerdone.com
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

  6. #2156
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Bless your heart, lambikins; if that's not my old "bread thing" -- and the date is about right- it's so close the difference won't amount to anything... I've decided to do the bread thing next Monday, 'cause I'm on vacation, and will be going to visit my parents; I know Dad and Mom would love to have a loaf!
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  7. #2157
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
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    Giz I once attended two French cooking classes. It was done by a couple of chefs in their own home on a Sat/Sun. Each class cost about $50-75/person. They did an entire meal. A soup/salad, main course, dessert. The first had salad St. Jacques, special crepes (I think), and Hazlenut Tarte. They supplied wine and as each course was cooked, we got to eat as well. Then we got a nice booklet of all the recipes. There were only 8 people per class but it was intimate and a wonderful night out as well. I don't know if it would be feasible or economical these days. But We really enjoyed it and wished it would have continued. I think a healthy spin on the recipes is a great idea too!
    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  8. #2158
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Request: A friend of ours wants to decorate a cake for her son's birthday party, and needs to use black frosting. But the black frosting she's found tastes like licorice, which is a no-no in her son's case.

    Does anyone know of a black frosting, or how to make a black frosting, that doesn't involve licorice? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  9. #2159
    Who Dat lildago's Avatar
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    phat, she can make black food coloring by mixing :

    1 1/2 tsp green
    1 1/2 tsp red
    5 drops blue

    I mix it with vanilla frosting for Halloween cupcakes and my picky little eater loves it!
    Getting lost will help you find yourself.

  10. #2160
    MRD
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    you can get black paste/or gel food coloring at Michael's Craft Stores or any other craft store in your area that sells cake decorating supplies. Paste food coloring is more intense in color and will give a true black. The liquid food colorings tend to thin the icing if you use too much of them.
    I had to use dark green, dark purple and gold for a Mardi Gras party and the paste color was GREAT. I will never use the liquid again. It was about $1.59 per little jar and I have enough to do several more cakes, so its not expensive either.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

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