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Thread: Recipes

  1. #1301
    Reformed Perfectionist G.G.'s Avatar
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    HAHAHAHAHAHA at reseverations.

    She didn't understand what speed "medium" should be. HER mixer didn't say slow, medium or fast, it had numerical speeds - 1 through 6. And she didn't understand the concept of greasing and flouring the pan...as in, shaking the excess flour out after the pan was coated.

    She IS a blonde...and the scary thing is that she's extremely smart. I don't know what was up with the cake thing...she hasn't called me with cooking questions since.

  2. #1302
    FORT Fogey veejer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lambikins
    veejer: Your recipe calls for making a chocolate Dream Whip from scratch, but my Jewel sells Chocolate Dream Whip, already made. Are they interchangeable or is the homemade version tastier?
    I need a Jewel!!!!

    They used to sell that around here but stopped. I thought they'd stopped making it. By all means, use it. It is so much better than homemade, much more chocolately.

    edited for spelling

  3. #1303
    Endlessly ShrinkingViolet's Avatar
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    Lambikins, I would suggest that you buy a "cooking basics" type of cookbook (Betty Crocker has a good one.) If someone doesn't know anything about cooking--including what kind of pans to use--a book such as that would teach you the basics of essential utensils, how to measure different types of foods (liquids versus solids), the mechanics of cooking and baking, etc.

    While ambitious to want to make a cake, that is rather analogous to wanting to drive a car and never having seen one before. Probably best to start with the basics and build from there. After all, you have two and a half months to prepare for the cake.

  4. #1304
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShrinkingViolet
    Lambikins, I would suggest that you buy a "cooking basics" type of cookbook (Betty Crocker has a good one.) If someone doesn't know anything about cooking--including what kind of pans to use--a book such as that would teach you the basics of essential utensils, how to measure different types of foods (liquids versus solids), the mechanics of cooking and baking, etc.

    While ambitious to want to make a cake, that is rather analogous to wanting to drive a car and never having seen one before. Probably best to start with the basics and build from there. After all, you have two and a half months to prepare for the cake.
    Hey, S.V. :I hope you're not suggesting that I buy a basic cookbook for me! Ouch! I'll assume that you mean for me to buy Kim a basic cookbook.

    Actually, I went to ebay to see if I could find the 1962 version of Betty Crocker's cookbook (the one with the pie-shaped wheel with fondue pot) and you would. not. believe. the prices the books are getting! Anywhere from $30.00 to $64.00...PER BOOK!!!...for the real deal!

    So, I did a websearch, found an antique book dealer that was selling her copy for $20.00 bucks and bought Kim that one. Apparently, all the Baby Boomer parents are looking for that book and the 1962 Cookie Book so they can give them as presents to their kids and grandkids. I've got both original copies from my mom when she cleared out her house; those two books sell for over $100.00 on ebay! I've got a bloody fortune in cookbooks (from appreciation) and never knew it!

    I agree with the analogy of driving and serious cake making, S.V. That's why I'm starting her on simple deserts like crisps and custards. I think it will be pretty interesting to make veejer's mix cake and later to make a scratch cake and allow Kim to see and taste the difference...plus how involved scratch baking is.

    But, it also boils down to 'time spent together'. It was pretty touching, when we were washing and drying dishes together, listening to classic Brian Eno on the CD player and just spending quality female time together.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  5. #1305
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShrinkingViolet
    While ambitious to want to make a cake, that is rather analogous to wanting to drive a car and never having seen one before. Probably best to start with the basics and build from there. After all, you have two and a half months to prepare for the cake.
    That's true. However, I did have a friend who said she had only made a couple of cakes and they were disasters; I finally came up with the idea of actually having her stand there and look over into the bowl to see what "fold", "cream" , etc. etc. LOOKED like instead of guessing. Then, I had her make the same type of cake, which turned out just fine. Now, if she had tried to make an angel food cake or anything like that afterward, I guess we would have had to have another lesson, but for pound cakes and the regular layer kind she was just fine from then on.That's how I learned-- Mom never let us actually touch her cake mixing process, but when I was about 12 I started baking them myself and never had any trouble. Same with most stuff; watching, to me is way more instructive than hands-on, unless maybe an expert could be the one to stand there and watch, saying STOP NOW...demonstrating how to use spatulas, etc.
    By the way, my favorite basic cook book has always been "Joy of Cooking", although I can tell I'll be cursing that small type in a few years.

    Lambikins, I'm glad you made the cinnamon rolls! I was afraid that recipe was too long and drawn out for anyone to fool with it. And you're absolutely correct, it's not a great idea to "remember" that recipe too often.
    As for cake tips...hmmm.
    I had always preferred to use the regular colored pans, because the old dark brown nonstick ones tended to burn the cake on the bottom, but the newer type of nonstick that is a silver color has done just fine for me.
    I haven't made a chocolate layered cake in a while, and can't seem to locate mine, but it had either 4 or 5 eggs in it and sour cream, and was definately good and moist. Maybe you could search for a Sour Cream Chocolate or Fudge cake.
    I find that the problem with lots of recipes that seems to make for a dry cake nowadays is, they seem to be trying to cut too many fats/ calories in the interest of health... Bah, I'd rather restrict desserts to once a week and have the good kind!
    Maybe finding an older recipe with plenty of eggs, butter, and a little milk in it wioll help.
    Last edited by queenb; 03-12-2005 at 09:24 AM.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  6. #1306
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Chocolate Sour Cream Cake

    Quote Originally Posted by queenb
    ... unless maybe an expert could be the one to stand there and watch, saying STOP NOW...demonstrating how to use spatulas, etc.
    I decided to teach Kim via the above method for a couple of reasons. First, Kim isn't a little kid any longer and at 16 years old, the last thing that you want to feel like is a "baby". Also, in the course of my teaching her how to beat an egg, she confided to me that her sister's live-in boyfrriend isn't exactly happy that Kim is living with them and cramping their life-style , so he picks on her and criticizes everything she does. Yah, you could say that she's exaggerating, but, when I brought her back home, right in front of me, Clive said, "I sure hope that you didn't let Kim lose in the kitchen...she's a retard and can't even make scrambled eggs!" Poor Kim, was holding a container with the leftovers from her apple crisp in her hands, and had to hear this!

    Secondly, my partner Sally has told me that when she was growing up and learing to do anything, her mother or father would "show" her how to do it, but when she wanted to actually put the learning into practice, they wouldn't allow her! So, she got to see how to paint a wall, change the oil, or bake, but they always treated her like she was mentally and physically handicapped! Now, at 26 years old, this is baggage that she carries into her adult life, because when anyone tries to share with her responsibilities, she shoves them aside and says, "I CAN DO IT! I CAN DO IT!" I've had to do some unofficial psych counciling on her to make her aware of this problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by queenb
    By the way, my favorite basic cook book has always been "Joy of Cooking", although I can tell I'll be cursing that small type in a few years.
    I am so glad that you brought up this book, queenb! I never had Joy of Cooking until 2 weeks ago, when I got a wonderful old copy off of ebay because it comes so highly recommended. I've not used it yet, but that would probably be a wonderful addition to Kim's cookbooks. I want to give her both the Betty Crocker and Joy cookbooks so that when she does flee her sister's house at 18, she'll have some good cooking skills and knowledge.

    Quote Originally Posted by queenb
    Lambikins, I'm glad you made the cinnamon rolls! I was afraid that recipe was too long and drawn out for anyone to fool with it. And you're absolutely correct, it's not a great idea to "remember" that recipe too often.
    No recipe is too long if you want to make it! Plus, I'm a very, very patient person who loves minutae! I design extremely complicated beaded jewelry during the winter months and will tear a piece apart up to 10 times to get it "perfect". Making cinnamon rolls, compared to that, is like falling off a log!
    Quote Originally Posted by queenb
    As for cake tips...hmmm.
    I had always preferred to use the regular colored pans, because the old dark brown nonstick ones tended to burn the cake on the bottom, but the newer type of nonstick that is a silver color has done just fine for me.
    I haven't made a chocolate layered cake in a while, and can't seem to locate mine, but it had either 4 or 5 eggs in it and sour cream, and was definately good and moist. Maybe you could search for a Sour Cream Chocolate or Fudge cake.
    You've convinced me to skip the quest for those expensive silicone pans and just buy the Baker's Secret pans from Jewel. I didn't want to ignore my friend's suggestion with the silicone pans but not only are they costly, but, you have to store them in a very specific way or they "forget their shape....PERMANENTLY!" She has both a silicone muffin pan and Bundt pan that are permanently mishaped due to something in the cabinet sliding onto them and she can no longer use them because they provide uneven baking times. When's the last time that happened to a hard, metal pan? I'm usually the first one to stand in line for kitchen gimicks, but since I've NEVER had a problem with muffins, rolls or loaf bread releasing from my Silverstone, I doubt cake will be a problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by queenb
    I find that the problem with lots of recipes that seems to make for a dry cake nowadays is, they seem to be trying to cut too many fats/ calories in the interest of health... Bah, I'd rather restrict desserts to once a week and have the good kind!
    Maybe finding an older recipe with plenty of eggs, butter, and a little milk in it wioll help.
    My delightful friend, Claire, she of the three teen daughters, has...from the beginning, had "Dessert Friday" for her family. The kids must eat fruit and yogurt for snacks during the other 6 days, but on Friday afternoon, after school, they get to chose any single dessert recipe that they want, make it and gorge on it! It's a huge family affair, which I've been part of, and quite fun to have 5 chicks in the kitchen, whipping up brownies, Rice Krispie treats, cake, etc.

    Her youngest daughter, who is now 10 years old, will probably, in all likelyhood, become a professional chef when she's older. She's been cooking, on her own, since she was 3 years old! One of the cuter, bordering on adorable, aspects of her progress, is that last year she (Cora) opened up a "restaurant" in the family room and served her family and grandparents for the weekend! Cora took it really seriously: she made up and printed menus on the computer, she took her family's orders, made them up and served them on special dinnerware that she bought...with HER money...from Dollar Bills. She had made a poster, which was the official signage for her restaurant, that greeted her patrons when they walked into the house and had fresh flowers and actual cloth napkins on the table. How cool that Cora did all this and even cooler that her mom would indulge her passions and allow it to happen. Happy and mentally healthy family's don't happen by accident!!!

    queenb : I did do a search for your Chocolate Sour Cream cake and this is the closest I found to what you described. Most of the recipes used OIL instead of butter and only 1 egg vs. the multiple eggs that you remembered using.

    Here's also another thought on Kim's birthday cake for sweetie: Using a BUNDT CAKE pan, of which I have 3!! I had totally forgotten about them, having stored them wa-a-a-y out of reach in a closet. But, this recipe calls for using a Bundt pan, and that would allow Kim's cake to not only look Officially like a Birthday Cake, but also, my pans are those shaped and styled pans that Kaiser Aluminum makes with spires and swirls, so it's very showy.

    Check out this recipe and let me know if it's close to your's, queenb. Thanks for all the great advice; you've calmed my fears considerably!

    CHOCOLATE SOUR CREAM CAKE

    Chocolate Sour Cream Cake
    The trick to a fudgy cake is to bake it just until the top is firm to the touch, but not hard. It will still be moist inside if tested with a cake tester. As the cake cools, the chocolate hardens again. This batter is enriched with sour cream and flavored with light brown sugar.

    4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped
    1-1/4 cups water
    3/4 cup (1-1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
    2 cups packed light brown sugar
    1 cup sugar
    3 large eggs
    1 tablespoon vanilla extract
    1 cup sour cream
    1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    3-1/4 cups all-purpose flour

    Set the oven at 350 degrees, with a rack in the center. Butter a 10-inch Bundt pan thoroughly. Dust it with flour. Turn the pan upside down on the counter and rap it hard once to remove the excess flour.

    In a medium saucepan, melt the chocolate in the water until the mixture is smooth. Remove from the heat and let sit until cool but still liquid.

    Cream the butter in a large bowl with an electric mixer until it is soft and light. Add the sugars and beat until fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in the vanilla, then the chocolate.

    In a small bowl, combine the sour cream, baking soda, and salt. The mixture will begin to froth and bubble; work quickly.

    With the mixer set on its lowest speed, add the flour to the batter alternately with the sour cream mixture, beginning and ending with the flour. Pour the batter into the pan.

    Bake for 55 minutes in the center of the oven, or until the cake springs back when pressed gently with a fingertip and pulls away from the sides. The cake will still be moist inside.

    Remove from the oven and set the cake on a wire rack for 30 minutes. Turn it out of the pan onto the rack, set it right side up, and cool completely before serving.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  7. #1307
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    For baking I love my Air Bake pans, also the stoneware from Pampered Chef bakes beautifully.

    Lambikins, I think that is so cool how you're taking Kim under your wing and teaching her to cook. You're a good woman.

  8. #1308
    Cy Young 2010 Mariner's Avatar
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    Between The Joy of Cooking and The New Basics cookbooks, I've managed to figure out the answers to most of my basic cooking questions. I love them both for different reasons.

  9. #1309
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marleybone
    For baking I love my Air Bake pans, also the stoneware from Pampered Chef bakes beautifully.

    Lambikins, I think that is so cool how you're taking Kim under your wing and teaching her to cook. You're a good woman.
    Thanks, Marleybone, for the confirmation. I chose to not have my own children because I was so afraid that I'd turn into my Mom. But, by working through my 'stuff', I'm able to get past it.

    When I read so many posters here talking about Rachel Ray, I decided to check her out so I spent a couple of days watching the Food Network. It was the P.S.A.'s on the Food Network that really affected me, in their pleading adults to Teach Kids to Cook! The most important thing that I walked away with was almost the National Crisis with this current generation of kids (18 and under) having virtually NO skills in the kitchen. But, not only that, it's the bonding experience that young kids get to have with a mentor.

    Then, I happened upon some cookbooks by Marcia Adams and the Frugal Gourmet, who were also raising a "cry to arms" over the Lost Generation of kids who only knew microwaved food and take out. I had no idea that it had reached a crisis with so many kids in this country. And I'm not talking about children raised by maids and nannies who had prepared meals served to them. This is ordinary kids with ordinary parents who are forgetting that cooking is a skill that teaches patience, math, passion and inventiveness...all the while producing something yummy!

    I feel that anyone who works with kids is doubly blessed because they get to pass on their knowledge and also they benefit from having young friends. I sure know that I'm enjoying being with Kim and our time together!
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  10. #1310
    FORT Fogey veejer's Avatar
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    I was at Meijer's this afternoon getting a bridal shower present and saw those silicon baking pans for the first time. Weird!!!!

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