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Thread: Recipes

  1. #1291
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    I made these cinnamon rolls yesterday for the first time in years...I had forgotten how good they are! I only made 1/2 of the recipe, and it came out just fine. The "hands on' time is only about an hour.

    Cinnamon Rolls

    Total time: 3 1/2 hours
    Dough:

    2 packages yeast
    1 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
    1 1/2 cups warm water, about 100 degrees F
    1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature
    1 cup milk
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons salt
    8 1/2 to 9 cups all-purpose flour

    Filling:

    1 1/2 cups packed light brown sugar
    1/2 cup all-purpose flour
    4 tablespoons cinnamon
    1 cup (2 sticks) butter, room temperature
    2 cups chopped nuts --optional

    Glaze:

    2 1/2 cups confectioners' sugar
    3 tablespoons corn syrup
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    2 to 4 tablespoons milk

    To make the dough: Dissolve yeast and 2 tablespoons sugar in 1/2 cup warm water. Place 1/2 cup butter and 1 cup sugar in a large bowl. Scald milk and pour over butter. Stir to melt. Stir in remaining 1 cup warm water. Stir in the yeast mixture. Stir in eggs. Stir in salt and 5 cups flour. Gradually stir in 3 cups more flour. Turn out onto a heavily floured surface. Knead until smooth and elastic, adding remaining flour as necessary to prevent dough from sticking. Place dough in a greased or buttered bowl, cover with a piece of greased or buttered plastic wrap or with a damp towel, and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 2 hours.

    To make the filling: In a medium bowl, mix together the brown sugar, flour and cinnamon. Stir in the butter, first with a spoon, then using your fingers, until well-combined.

    Turn out risen dough onto a smooth surface and pat or roll into a large rectangle, about 26 inches by 20 inches. Using a flat-bladed spatula, spread with cinnamon mixture. Sprinkle with the nuts if you are using them. Roll the dough up jelly roll style , and seal the end of the roll to keep it from unrolling. Use a piece of heavy string, and 'tie off' 1 sections. (You can cut them, but the rolls look better this way.) Place rolls 3 inches apart on baking sheets that have been sprayed with cooking spray. Cover and let rise for 30 minutes to an hour.

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake rolls until lightly browned, 15-18 minutes. Remove from oven.

    To make the glaze: In a medium bowl, stir together the confectioners' sugar, corn syrup, vanilla and enough milk to make a just-pourable mixture. Drizzle over rolls. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  2. #1292
    Premium Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaaam
    Okay...my neighbor bought a George Forman Grill, and it kicks butt! She placed FROZEN meat right on the grill and it was done in a few minutes...we are talking E A S Y
    I love mine too. Mr. Marleybone got me the big one awhile back for Christmas. The only bad thing is now that my sons are grown it's way too huge for just the two of us.

  3. #1293
    Fort Regular angelic_one2002's Avatar
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    I had two Foreman grills, and they both chipped..the black non-stick cooking part of them. We only used rubber or plastic utensils on it, too.
    "At the beach, life is different. Time doesn't move hour to hour but mood to moment. We live by the currents, plan by the tides, and follow the sun." - anonymous

  4. #1294
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Let them EAT cake!

    queenb: Have you been inside my head again?! I've been off of the computer for awhile, just doing things in reality, so when I came here to see what's been posted, I found your wonderful recipe for cinnamon rolls! I've been 'jones-ing' for old fashioned cinnamon rolls for the past couple of weeks, now, and your recipe hit the spot...well, many spots (hips, chin, tummy...). I also made the 1/2 recipe and froze the rest; they are so delicious and remind me of my early years when my Gran would have cinnamon rolls waiting for me when I came home from school.

    I LOVE MY GEORGE FORMAN GRILL!! I've got two now; a One Person size and the largest one out there that serves 4, I think. As regulars know, I have a dreaded fear over butane grills and won't go near one, so this grill allows me to have some tasty food...and stay alive in the process.

    THIS IS A QUESTION FOR ALL CAKE BAKERS:

    I'm currently teaching a 16 year old girl, Kim, how to cook. She's a family friend and has had a really sucky life. Being bounced from foster home to foster home while her drug-selling mom was in jail, she's now living with her sister (my friend), who gained custody of her when the mom finally abdicated parental rights. Kim knows nothing about making meals...I mean absolutely nothing! I had to teach her how to measure ingredients, beat an egg, and make scrambled eggs.

    Her fondest wish, is to make a 'from scratch' 2 layer cake for her 17 year old boyfriends birthday in late May.

    Now, I consider myself quite a chef, excelling in baking, but I've never made a cake from scratch....because I never ate a cake that I liked.

    From dried out, over-frosted wedding cakes to dried out, over-frosted birthday cakes, I'd usually scrape theCrisco-based frosting off, into a napkin, and after one bite of the saw-dust inspired recipe, I'd add the cake to the napkin...giving both a pitch into the nearest trash bin.

    I know that there HAS to be good cake recipes out there, and they are probably from scratch.

    Problem is: I need to buy 9" round cake pans for Kim's project and I'm completely confused as to what to buy.

    Some of my recipe books call for "shiny, bright aluminum."

    Some of my recipe books call for "dark, heavy aluminum."

    A cake-making friend said, "Forget that! and go and get "silicone pans".

    Well, silicone pans seem just "wrong" to me, and they're beastly expensive!

    Are there any master cake bakers out here? What do you bake your cakes in?

    Do you have a good chocolate cake recipe for a layer cake?

    Time is ticking and I want to bake some test samples before I teach Kim, so I need to buy the pans fast!.

    Any help will be greatly appreciated!!!
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  5. #1295
    FORT Fogey veejer's Avatar
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    My chocolate cake isn't from scratch but it gets rave reviews and is ridiculously easy, perhaps a good place to start. I received 2-8" dark, non-stick Baker's Secret cake pans when I got married 18+ years ago and they are still in use. This would work in 9 inch pans too.

    It is best assembled a day ahead of time as the jam soaks into the cake and makes it really moist.

    Ingredients:

    Duncan Hines Moist Deluxe Devil's Food cake mix, plus the required water, oil and eggs
    Smucker's SEEDLESS Black Raspberry Jam - 12 oz jar, divided into thirds
    Cool Whip - 12 oz tub (Do not use store brands as they aren't always as stiff)
    Hershey's chocolate syrup, like what you would use to make chocolate milk

    Three days before serving - Move Cool Whip from freezer to fridge

    Two days before serving - Fold enough chocolate syrup into cool whip to give it color and slight chocolate taste. But not too much or it will be runny. Return to fridge to chill.

    Day before serving - bake and assemble

    Cut out circles of wax paper to line bottom of pans. Grease pans, flour lightly, then put in pans.

    Prepare mix according to directions, divide between the two pans and bake according to directions. As the mix directs, I set my oven to 325 instead of 350 for the dark pans. I set my timer for a couple of minutes less than the directed time and check for doneness both with a toothpick and pulling away from the edge.

    When done, cool in pan on wire rack for 15 minutes. Then remove from pans and cool completely on the wire racks. I cool one layer upside down. The layers stay together better that way.

    When cool, slice layers in half horizontally to make four layers. Before separating the layers to assemble, I put toothpicks in both halves of each layer, one right above the other. That way I can put the layers back together easier by just lining up the toothpicks.

    Starting with the bottom half of the upside down layer, place each layer on cake plate and cover with one third of the jam. Spread to within about 1/4" of the edge as the weight of the cake will press down and spread it out more. Continue for three layers, then place the fourth layer on top.

    This cake tends to slide if the layers aren't secured together. I use a couple of long sandwich toothpicks right in the middle. My MIL (her recipe) uses a craft stick. But that is too long and she has to cut it off.

    Once assembled, brush off as many crumbs as possible and spread with cool whip mixture. I use a narrow rubber scraper to spread it and put most of it on top and just lightly cover the sides. If there seems to be too much cool whip, don't put quite all of it on.

    Don't try and make it look pretty as the cool whip needs to set up again. Put the cake in the fridge until shortly before serving.

    Day of serving

    Using a narrow rubber scraper or spatula, swirl the cool whip on the sides and create peaks on the top. Personally, I'm not very good at that as mine usually looks like a hedgehog on a bad hair day, but my MIL can create awesome curly peaks. But mine tastes great nonetheless.

    It can also be decorated with chocolate curls and fresh raspberries. Plain vanilla ice cream goes great with it too. Enjoy!!!

    ETA: What ever kind of cake plate you use, this needs to be covered so that it doesn't dry out in the fridge. I have a fancy glass plate with a dome that I use when I am serving a cake at home, and a tupperware cake carrier for taking them places.
    Last edited by veejer; 03-11-2005 at 10:50 AM.

  6. #1296
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by veejer
    My chocolate cake isn't from scratch but it gets rave reviews and is ridiculously easy, perhaps a good place to start. I received 2-8" dark, non-stick Baker's Secret cake pans when I got married 18+ years ago and they are still in use. This would work in 9 inch pans too.
    veejer: Thank you for this great recipe! I've used Baker's Secret Pans for almost the length of time that you have and I've never experienced a problem. I know that these silicone pans are supposed to be the 'be all and end all' for cooking, but to me, they seem like a gimmick. And a costly one, at that. I can pick up Baker's Secret pans at my local Jewel food store.

    Kim actually requested to make a Devil's Food Cake, and I think that you might be right, to start with a mix so she doesn't become over-whelmed with the sifting/sifting/sifting that from scratch recipes call for. I'll let her chose what she wants to do, cause you know kids: sometimes it's the concept (from scratch) that is more important than the end results (from mix). She may or may not feel that she did something important for her boyfriend if it came from a box. Thanks, veejer!
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  7. #1297
    FORT Fogey veejer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lambikins
    I'll let her chose what she wants to do, cause you know kids: sometimes it's the concept (from scratch) that is more important than the end results (from mix). She may or may not feel that she did something important for her boyfriend if it came from a box. Thanks, veejer!


    I have a 15 year old myself, so I know exactly what you mean. Good luck!!

  8. #1298
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Thanks, veejer! And since you have a child in the same age bracket, you know exactly what I mean by the 'concept' of things!

    I've been reading in magazines and articles about the absolutely alarming phenominom of contemporary kids, from wealthy to poor, having ZERO ability to cook for themselves! On the Food Network, they're doing PSA's from all the show chef's proclaiming, "Teach your kids to cook!", or some such phrase like that.

    I had no idea that it had become so serious. But, I was watching TV last night, and an ad came on where a wee girl was "cooking" her mom some dinner, and they showed the little poppet making microwave rice! It was a touching ad, but nevertheless, the girl still did NOT know how to make rice any other way.

    When I got hold of Kim, she did not know how to measure dry ingredients, peel an apple or beat an egg to add into a recipe. When I asked her, "What do you make at your sister's house?", she said, "Microwave stuff."

    She's at least 80 pounds overweight (at 16 years old!), works at Popeye's Chicken where they can eat all the fried food they want, and at 18 is intending to move out of her sister's to be on her own. To be so handicapped that the only food options are Take Out and Microwave limits your abilities AND your pocket book.

    So, I've taught her how to make scrambled eggs, apple crisp, mushroom soup, grilled cheese and baked custard. (she had never heard of custard! ) This weekend, I'm teaching her how to make that Proscuito Frittata, a tossed salad and Oatmeal Scotchie cookies.

    veejer: Your recipe calls for making a chocolate Dream Whip from scratch, but my Jewel sells Chocolate Dream Whip, already made. Are they interchangeable or is the homemade version tastier?
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  9. #1299
    Reformed Perfectionist G.G.'s Avatar
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    Heh...my sister called me once because she wanted to make a cake and wasn't sure how. It was a boxed mix. She didn't get it.

  10. #1300
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G.G.
    Heh...my sister called me once because she wanted to make a cake and wasn't sure how. It was a boxed mix. She didn't get it.
    No disrespect to your sister, G.G., but this sounds like the start of a good "Blond" joke!

    What did she NOT understand? I mean, the box has directions, right? Still sounds like a blond joke!

    When I was married, my executive husband came home and told me that while he and the President of Montgomery Ward were in a meeting, the pres got a phone call from his wife, who demanded to be put through to him.

    Seems the maid hadn't come that day (called in sick) and his wife didn't know how to "make the vacuum 'go'"! So, this very important person, who ran a major chain, had to talk his wife into finding the vaccum switch, all while he had his V.P.'s in the office!

    You just got to know that the only thing this wife made for dinner, was 'reservations'!
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

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