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Thread: Recipes

  1. #1191
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hepcat
    There's no shame in admitting you were agonizing over the pie shells, Lambikins. If that rant was tongue-in-cheek, I'll eat my hat. You can't call yourself Queen of Pie then back off - that's no fun!

    Meant in the spirit of friendliness and all that. I usually buy those pre-made crusts in the refrigerated section myself.
    I thought that I'd give you a really fine selection to dine on, hepcat! Would you like a nice bechamel sauce to go with that?

    Okay, you 'busted' me; I was angry while I was reading her recipe and when I composed the rant on WORD, but after reading it to myself, I just began to crack up over the whole thing. Hence, the 'taking the piss out of myself' with the moniker "Queen of Pie"; (but I did limit my reign to my Tiny Universe of One!)

    Quote Originally Posted by Marleybone
    Sure lambi, I'd love your recipe. Why don't you just post the whole buttermilk pie recipe while you're at it. Mine comes from Fannie Farmer but my SIL makes a different one. I think mine is better. I'd love to compare.
    I'm putting together the pies, as we speak. I've got the filling all made and am just about to roll out the dough. I'm making them as tarts, rather than a pie, because tarts are just more fun to eat! Plus, you don't look like such a pig if you wolf one down!

    I'll post both the filling and crust recipe later tonight.

    Quote Originally Posted by canuckinchile
    I have baked a lot of pies myself...and I agree with you lambi. I totally don't get the point of glazing the crust that is going to be filled. Was there any reason given? Also, overbaking a crust is never a good thing..
    She's got an entire chapter on the "philosophy" of pre-baking the pie shell; wa-a-a-y more words than befit my copying here. She claims that "all professional pastry chefs use this method"....OR one method even MORE bizarre than this one:

    She says "to absolutely guarantee a crispy crust that won't get soggy, bake your custard fillings separately, in their own pie pan, and when cool, tip them into the pre-baked crust."

    Like that's going to happen in kitchen's across America!

    She must have suffered some Childhood Trauma with Soggy Bottoms and she's working 'through the process'. I could understand if this was some 1940's or 50's cookbook, when women were chained to the house, but it's a current cookbook.

    I can just see her trying to explain to her husband why the house is a mess and she exclaims, "But, Honey, I was baking my custard separately from my crusts and couldn't possibly take time out to clean!"

    Yeah. Whatever.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  2. #1192
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    All the Who's down in Whoville were eating their pie...

    All's well that end's well:

    I followed all your advice about the Food Police coming to my home, locked the doors, closed the blinds, and went ahead and baked the pies WITHOUT pre-baking the crust. (Take THAT, Pie Bitca!)

    End result: perfection, just as all my other pies have turned out.

    I must have been having a Crisis of Faith, that I had to do the "Freak Out" over this dumb pie book.

    Instead of making one big pie, I used this wonderful pie tart tins, with removable bottoms, to bake them in.

    Poured the filling inside the crusts, dotted the top with an apricot half covered in peach preserves and baked them.

    The aroma...just this side of Heaven.

    Now, in the last fading rays of the day, I'm setting down in the sun room, cuppa Scottish Blend tea in one hand and a tart in the other!

    And Maveno: I mean this type of "tart" ...NOT this type of "tart"!
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  3. #1193
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaaam
    Good/different after dinner drink~
    1 mint tea bag
    1 cups milk
    1 tbs hot chocolate mix

    In a saucepan, heat milk with tea bag until almost boiling. Steep for a few minutes and strain out tea bags. Pour milk in mug, then stir in a tablespoon of chocolate powder in mug.
    And for those of you in cold places, when you come in from playing in the snow...try a shot of Peppermint Schnapps in your hot chocolate; tastes just like a York Peppermint Patty!
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  4. #1194
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by queenb
    And for those of you in cold places, when you come in from playing in the snow...try a shot of Peppermint Schnapps in your hot chocolate; tastes just like a York Peppermint Patty!
    Aw-w-w-w, why'd ya have to go and tempt me with that recipe, queenb ?!?!

    I had totally forgotten that pleasurable drink; it was Standard Issue in Uni back home in Minnesota.

    Well, at least I saw your post before I left for the grocery store. Guess I better hit the liquor store, too!



    (Note: 'Hit' as in "visit, procure, spend money", NOT 'Hit' as in "visit, rob, get-away car!".)
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  5. #1195
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Bee's Buttermilk Pie With Cornmeal Crust

    Marleybone and Company: I have no memory of ever tasting buttermilk pie at my Grandmother's house. She made a wickedly perfect custard pie, which I still feel is the best one that I've ever eaten, but buttermilk...uh-uh.

    In fact, I had never even heard of buttermilk pie before I tasted my first one. I was newly married, didn't cook yet, (Husband loved to go "out" for meals. Expense account, ya know?!) , and we were on vacation in the Northern Woods of Minnesota, around Ely.

    We stopped at one of those wonderful Blue Highway joints, the type that I don't even know if they exist any more: knotty pine paneling, wobbly tables with matchbooks stuck under the legs to stabilize them, and oil cloth on the table tops. We were starving, saw the mass of cars around the place, and both of us thought, "This place HAS to be good!"

    It was.

    Along with the freshest fish this side of still living, this wee place was locally known for Minnie's pies. That's right: Minnie. She of the Blue hair, be-floured apron and orthopedic stockings on her swollen legs. Minnie made pies and the locals and occasional straggler were only too obliged to help rid her of her wares.

    The chalk board menu listed a complete Baker's Dozen of varieties to choose from: Chocolate Cream, Rhubarb, Mixed Berry, Mile High Lemon Meringue, etc...and Buttermilk. THAT was what I had to have, thinking it about the strangest thing to make a pie out of.

    Minnie and her minions bustled around the place, sliding steaming orders of perch and fries onto the table tops, whisking them away when emptied and replacing them with her confections. When our time came for plate replacement, I ordered my buttermilk and Selma, our waitress, had to check to see if any was left. "That's one of our best sellers," she said, "Ya gotta get here early to get a piece of buttermilk."

    I waited in anticipation, as Selma walked to the pie case and did an inventory of it's wares. She moved pies around, bent over, craned her neck, moved some more pies around....and then came back to our table with...the last piece of buttermilk pie! "I guess Sam didn't eat it all!", she proclaimed, explaining that Sam was one of the locals that always came in each day for a cuppa Joe and three pieces of pie, usually buttermilk.

    As she left to attend to others, I gazed in wonderment at simple perfection: butter-yellow in colour, flecked with freshly grated nutmeg on top; it was almost too beautiful to cut into. But, hunger overcame aesthetics so fork went to pie and pie went to mouth and you know the rest. Had there been another piece, or better yet, an entire pie, I would have/could have eaten it all. Beautifully smooth, the slightest *tang* on your tongue when tasting it...the pie disappeared so fast, I had to check under the table to be sure it hadn't fallen off of my plate.

    Sam, wherever you are, I know how you could eat three pieces in one sitting.

    Soon, those plates were whisked away, the coffee refreshed and the tab set on the table. As I said earlier, this was wa-a-a-y before I baked on my own pies, equating them with something Grandma did, not something that I would do. We paid, we left, and we headed up to Thunder Bay, Ontario.

    But, as some people's hearts are left in San Francisco, my stomach was left in Minnie's Cafe.

    The pie haunted me. I wanted to have my husband turn the car around. I no longer cared about amethyst mining or hiking, damn it! I wanted MORE pie, specifically buttermilk pie!

    The recipe for Buttermilk Pie became my Holy Grail.

    When we returned back home, sadly via a different route, I began to look in my two cookbooks for the recipe. Nothing. Of course, these were "modern" cookbooks and nothing as quaint or simple as this pie should grace and sully their pages.

    So, I went to bookstores. This was so before the Internet that your only hope of finding a recipe was to buy the book that it came inside of. That quest launched my Pie Book fetish. Thirteen books later, and thirteen pies later, I had found what I remembered Minnie's pie to taste like: simple, rich, with the only other taste to be nutmeg.

    Oh, there were imitators, to be sure. They were the buttermilk pie recipes that were ashamed to be "buttermilk". Nefarious intruders like lemon peel, lemon juice, lemon slices were added; did these bakers have Lemon Meringue 'envy' so that's why they would try to disguise their Buttermilk pies purity?

    There were currants and raisins and thing-a-ma-bobs galore added to their recipes. Ya know, sometimes, you just WANT something simple. Something NOT complex. Something so perfect that you didn't have to play a guessing game with the ingredients.

    And I had finally found what I was looking for, in a Lutheran Church Ladies Recipe Collection, dated 1947. Hidden among the Jello molds, the Macaroni and Pea salads, and the endless Tuna Casseroles with "Surprise" toppings, was this simple recipe, served in a cornmeal crust.

    Ya gotta love the Church Ladies. They know that not just the Good Book is necessary to survive, but, Man (and woman) MUST eat P.I.E.

    I have made this recipe literally hundreds of times. It is always a delight, to serve the unaware this treasure of simpler times. I've passed this recipe on to whoever requests it and it currently delights countless new devotees of a taste long forgotten.

    So, to all the Minnie's and Sam's, to all the Mom & Pop cafes with knotty pine paneling and red checkered curtains and oil-skin table cloths, this recipe is dedicated to YOU.

    Love, Lambi

    BEES BUTTERMILK PIE WITH CORNMEAL CRUST

    1-9 unbaked cornmeal pie crust

    2/3 Cup of Sugar

    3 Tablespoons of All-Purpose Flour

    3 Large Eggs, separated, yolks slightly beaten, not whipped

    Dash o Salt (that is EXACTLY what the original recipe stated!)

    2 Cups of Buttermilk

    teaspoon of Vanilla

    1 Tablespoon of Unsalted Butter, melted and cooled to room temperature

    Dash o Nutmeg (see above)

    3 Egg Whites, (optional, if you want a meringue topping)

    Combine all filling ingredients except egg whites. Beat well, but NOT until foamy. Strain through a mesh strainer as you fill your pie shell. (this eliminates bubbles).

    Bake in a pre-heated 450 degree oven for 15 minutes.

    Reduce heat to 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Shake pie gently to check for doneness. There should be slight movement but not quaking.

    Let pie cool.

    At this stage, you can serve it as is, or you can top it with a meringue. Depending on my mood and time allowances, Ill do either.

    If topping with meringue, bake in 325 degree oven for 10-12 minutes until meringue is slightly browned.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Perfect Meringue for 9 pie:

    3 Large Egg Whites
    teaspoon of Cream of Tartar
    teaspoon of Salt
    teaspoon of Vanilla
    6 Tablespoons of Sugar

    Have egg whites at room temperature to obtain greatest volume. Place them in a medium-sized bowl with cream of tartar, salt and vanilla.

    Beat with an electric mixer or by hand beater, at medium speed, until entire mixture is frothy. Do NOT beat until eggs stiffen.

    Add sugar, a little at a time, beating well after each addition. Do NOT under-beat. Beat until sugar is dissolved, to help prevent brown beading. To test, rub some of the meringue between your fingers to see if its still grainy, to touch. The grains are un-dissolved sugar.) Continue to beat until stiff, pointed peaks form when you lift the beater slowly.

    Place spoonfuls of meringue around the edges of the pie filling, spreading it so it touches the inner edge of crust to seal it all around. This prevents shrinkage. Pile remainder of meringue in center of pie and spread to meet meringue around the edge. If the filling is not completely covered, the oven heat will cause the pie to weep.

    Bake in a moderate oven 325 degrees for 12-15 minutes or until peaks are golden brown.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    CORNMEAL CRUST for 9 pie

    1 Cup of All-Purpose Flour
    teaspoon of Salt
    Cup of Yellow Cornmeal
    Cup plus 1 Tablespoon of Crisco
    Cup of Ice Water

    Sift together the flour and salt; stir in cornmeal.

    Cut in shortening until mixture resembles fine crumbs. Sprinkle Cup of ice water over the mixture gradually, mixing lightly with a fork or pastry blender.

    Shape into a ball; flatten between 2 layers of waxed paper. Roll out to 1/8 inch thickness.

    Dust flour on bottom of 9 pie pan; line the pan with the crust.

    Bake as recipe requires.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  6. #1196
    Mmmmmm, cheese tracylee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuckinchile
    Short answer: mining. Chile produces somewhere around 35 percent of the world's copper. We are really enjoying it here and have taken the opportunity to see lots! We are hoping to go to the Galapagos Islands next for vacation!
    Personally, I loved the Galapagos, but then my degree was in Zoology. Got a discount rate as a resident of Ecuador (many years ago).
    The only wines we got in Ecuador at the time were Chilean, Gato Negro and Gato Blanco, with the little plastic charms hanging on the neck. Of course, decent, traditional women didn't drink.

    One of these days I'll go back.
    One by one, the penguins are stealing my sanity

    CurvesForum

  7. #1197
    Soccer Kicks Balls cali's Avatar
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    I have a cooking question... I don't cook, so maybe this is a no brainer... I just don't know.

    My daughter is cooking dinner for her boyfriend tonight. The recipe says to preheat skillet to 350 then turn it down to 220. Well, we don'thave an electric skillet so she's using the stove. Our stove only has simmer, low, med, med high and high settings... anyone know what exactly we should put the burner on for those two temps?

    Anyone????
    "Rice is great when you're hungry and want 2,000 of something' -- Mitch Hedberg

  8. #1198
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    I don't know for sure, but I would say start on med-high and turn down to medium. I'm just guessing though.

  9. #1199
    I see dead people SQUATMAN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cali
    The recipe says to preheat skillet to 350 then turn it down to 220.
    Oh geez,
    how many people have a stove that will tell you stove top temps
    :rolleyes .
    I know the pancake trick: water dancing on a preheated skillet means the temp. is right, but I don't know exactly what that temp. is.

    I would suggest googling the recipe and find something close with more sensible instructions.

    what is the recipe for?

  10. #1200
    I see dead people SQUATMAN's Avatar
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    Too late to edit this into above post...

    WOW I can't believe I never saw this thread. Started reading from Page 1 and had to stop on pg. 4 because I have stuff to do today (copy&pasting the day away).

    I'd like to revisit the crockpot discussion a little later if that's okay, and go over my 15 years of Nesco experiences.

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