+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

  1. #11
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    46
    Posts
    17,011

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    Good article that probably sums it up for most of us children of the 80's:

    John Hughes defined a genre and a generation
    By CHRISTY LEMIRE, AP Movie Critic Christy Lemire, Ap Movie Critic

    LOS ANGELES "Saturday, March 24, 1984. Shermer High School, Shermer, Illinois, 60062.

    "Dear Mr. Vernon: We accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was we did wrong. And what we did was wrong. But we think you're crazy to make us write an essay telling you who we think we are. What do you care? You see us as you want to see us."

    Those are the opening lines from "The Breakfast Club," voiced by Anthony Michael Hall, accompanied by Simple Minds' "Don't You (Forget About Me)." And even though it's been nearly a quarter-century since John Hughes' seminal high-school drama came out, I still know them by heart. I probably still know the entire movie by heart. Any self-respecting child of the 1980s does.

    As a film critic, I am often asked what my favorite movies of all time are. That's a tough one to answer because the list is constantly changing. But alongside Fellini's "The Nights of Cabiria" and newer classics such as "Fargo," I always end up mentioning "The Breakfast Club" and "Sixteen Candles." They may not qualify as the greatest movies ever, but we're talking favorites, the ones that still engage you no matter how many times you've seen them.

    And so the news that Hughes died of a heart attack at 59 Thursday will, for many, strike the same sort of cultural chord that Michael Jackson's did: It prompts more than just a passing feeling of nostalgia but an active longing for a happier, more prosperous time. As both a writer and director, Hughes defined not just a genre but a generation.

    His movies didn't exactly represent high school as it was (seriously, who ever went to a blowout bash at a mansion like Jake Ryan's in "Sixteen Candles" or got away with as much as Ferris Bueller?) but rather, high school as we wished it could have been funnier, weirder, sweeter, full of kids who have just the right zinger or poignant thing to say:

    "Does Barry Manilow know that you raid his wardrobe?"

    "How about a nice, greasy pork sandwich served in a dirty ashtray?"

    "Blane? His name is Blane? That's a major appliance, that's not a name."

    "I can't believe I gave my panties to a geek."

    After watching "The Breakfast Club" with me on cable for the millionth time when I was a chubby 13-year-old, my mom suggested that we go to the video store and rent the teen-angst movie of her generation: "Rebel Without a Cause." I would like it, she said they were similar. And she was right in that they both captured the frustrating feeling that nobody understands you when you're young, that your problems are unique and insurmountable. Hughes took that raw energy and made it ironic and idiotic, self-referential and self-deprecating.

    Every teen movie that's come out since the mid-1980s owes a debt to John Hughes. He was that influential. Some acknowledge this willingly, as director Nanette Burstein did with last year's "American Teen," which was essentially a documentary version of "The Breakfast Club." Bill Paxton has said that of the dozens of character roles he's played over his lengthy career, he's still best known as Chet, the bullying older brother from 1985's "Weird Science." And "Some Kind of Wonderful" (which Hughes wrote) plays a pivotal part in the recent romantic comedy "He's Just Not That Into You."

    Others have parodied him endlessly in such varied settings as raunchy Kevin Smith comedies, the spoof "Not Another Teen Movie" and the animated TV series "Family Guy." (In the episode where Peter goes undercover at Meg's high school as Lando Griffin, he walks across the football field and defiantly thrusts his fist in the air at the end, just as Judd Nelson did in the last image of "The Breakfast Club.")

    Granted, Hughes' work dwindled once the 1990s arrived and he lost his insight, his edge. His scripts for "Dennis the Menace," "Beethoven" and "Flubber" can't exactly compare with the ones he wrote for "National Lampoon's Vacation," "Home Alone" and "Planes, Trains and Automobiles."

    But if it weren't for Hughes, there would never have been a Brat Pack, that clique of sizzling young Hollywood actors who dominated the 1980s after "St. Elmo's Fire" (a Joel Schumacher film, but one with clear links to Hughes). Imagine the career trajectories of Hall, Nelson, Molly Ringwald, Emilio Estevez, Ally Sheedy and Jon Cryer without him. Or just try to think of Macaulay Culkin without conjuring the image of him slapping his hands to his wholesome face in horror.

    And so there's nothing wrong with wallowing in some unabashed '80s nostalgia upon the passing of John Hughes. As Ferris Bueller himself might have said at a time like this, "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it."
    John Hughes defined a genre and a generation - Yahoo! News
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  2. #12
    Thinking femme fatale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In a world of my own
    Age
    32
    Posts
    2,631

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    That was a great article, Crit.
    I'm a bit too young to have been around when the movies first came out, but I still think they are great (OK, so I've only seen The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink, but I like those).
    RIP, Mr. Hughes, youmade a great impact on the movie scene.-

  3. #13
    FORT Fogey sukee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kitchener
    Posts
    3,885

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    Quote Originally Posted by MotherSister;3644683;
    OMG.

    59 is not even ... 59 is young.


    Same here Crit. I'll be popping that in the DVD player tonight.
    It definitely is too young
    Reality leaves a lot to the imagination. ~John Lennon


    Write for HubPages.

  4. #14
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    In the trees
    Age
    54
    Posts
    6,911

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    I've loved John Hughes' work since his days at National Lampoon, where he was one of my two favourite writers (the other being P.J. O'Rourke). In fact, I had a huge crush on Mr. Hughes back in the 70s. Two of my particular favourite stories from NatLamp ended up in the movies as Vacation and Sixteen Candles. And there are few movies that can make me cry just thinking about it like Planes, Trains and Automobiles. And Christmas Vacation is one of only two Christmas movies I will watch voluntarily. Some of his later work was, admittedly, lacking, but the work of his heyday was seminal and iconic, and no amount of Curly Sues or Career Opportunities' or Maid in Manhattans will ever dimish that.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  5. #15
    FORT Fogey famita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,795

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    What fun movies to watch, be entertained, and yet have something to learn from.

  6. #16
    Premium Member dagwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    salt lake city ut
    Age
    43
    Posts
    19,161

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    Excellent article, Crit. Thanks for posting it.


    Quote Originally Posted by femme fatale;3646163;
    That was a great article, Crit.
    I'm a bit too young to have been around when the movies first came out, but I still think they are great (OK, so I've only seen The Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink, but I like those).
    RIP, Mr. Hughes, youmade a great impact on the movie scene.-
    If you have the chance, see Sixteen Candles. It is a great movie.

  7. #17
    80's Rule! karna68's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Age
    46
    Posts
    2,696

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical;3644423
    The Molly Ringwald "trilogy" ([I
    Sixteen Candles, Pretty in Pink[/i] and The Breakfast Club) were the movies when I was in high school, but my favorite John Hughes movie has always been Some Kind of Wonderful. I know my teenage years wouldn't have been the same without John Hughes.

    RIP Mr. Hughes
    Oh yeah, Some Kind of Wonderful is definitely at the top of my list.

  8. #18
    Pineapple! ClosetRTWatcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Groovin' with my human boom box
    Posts
    4,672

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    Sad news.

    My favs were:
    Sixteen Candles
    Ferris Bueller's Day Off
    Pretty in Pink
    Weird Science

  9. #19
    FORT Regular Storm915's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    119

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    RIP John,

    He personified the 80's. Bueller, Bueller...?

    His legacy will never be forgotten.

  10. #20
    Defying Gravity Jamie5632's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    475

    Re: Director John Hughes - dead at 59

    Some Kind of Wonderful is definitely my favorite John Hughes movie. I liked most of the other ones, but SKOW just did it for me. I LOVED Watts and any time I got upset over a boy in high school, that movie went into the VCR. I read that he wanted Duckie to end up with Andie in Pretty in Pink but test audiences hated it, so she ended up with Blaine instead. As a result, he wrote SKOW changing the genders but getting the ending he wanted. And a great line like "you look good wearing my future" was born, ha.
    Wag more, bark less

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.