+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: Occupy Amazon?

  1. #21
    FoRTer
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,094

    Re: Occupy Amazon?

    Plus, hasn't Amazon recently come out supporting the Marketplace Fairness Act?
    I can't really speak on the other issue of bookseller discounts, but I do see it as fair and sensible to allow states to decide on collecting online sales tax.

  2. #22
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    46
    Posts
    17,123

    Re: Occupy Amazon?

    Quote Originally Posted by coltnlasma View Post
    Plus, hasn't Amazon recently come out supporting the Marketplace Fairness Act?
    I can't really speak on the other issue of bookseller discounts, but I do see it as fair and sensible to allow states to decide on collecting online sales tax.
    That may be along the same vein as "you can't fire me, I quit" but whatever the reason, I think it's a good thing. They've been getting pressured in a lot of states about sales tax and I think they see the writing on the wall - better to go along willingly or at least seem to.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  3. #23
    FORT Fogey causingchaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,917

    Re: Occupy Amazon?

    I didn't read the entire thread but I'll put my two cents in. I use amazon avidly for a few reasons which have evolved over the years (and for more than just books).

    1. I'm a plus sized lady and amazon has a huge selection of clothes that fit me in one spot and fit me right. So I shop there because of the price and ease of use. I'm not rich. I have to take price into consideration.

    2. We used to have a small bookstore in town here with an extremely limited selection of books that seemed to revolve around religion, romance and sci fi. If I asked them to order me a book possibly in a month or in once case two (for Lolita of all things) I may get it. May... get it. I took to Amazon right away because i don't like the crap shoot of maybe getting a book and then waiting a month or two for it.

    3. I work a full time job. Our local stores are open pretty much only when I'm working. If the local, small retailers want my business they are going to have to stay open more than 9-5 hours. I don't have the luxury of taking days off just to use them and subsequently spend more at them for products. That includes the book store. Taxes excluded I can still get books cheaper at Target and Amazon for books than the local place offered. So not only did I have to go ut of my way to shop there at inconvenient times but I also had to pay more as a base price. I laugh out loud and hysterically at the small business Saturday holiday ads. Apparently these small business are not based in small towns. I'm hard pressed to find a small business that if it's open on the weekend open past about noon. I have very little sympathy to their plight in those cases.

    I'm willing to pay state taxes on amazon. I have no issues with that. Even doing that will still make the products more accessible and affordable than they are here otherwise. Then again I'm typically kind of an avid online shopper for pretty much the same reasons I shop at amazon.

  4. #24
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    46
    Posts
    17,123

    Re: Occupy Amazon?

    Okay, this is CRAZY. WTH is the state doing? If sales tax on those sales needs to be paid to the state, why are the individual taxpayers responsible for doing it and not Amazon? I haven't heard of any other state doing this. IMO, collecting sales tax and allocating employees to deal with that end of things should be built into the business. It's not like Amazon is struggling and in the red any more, so they could have a division that takes care of the tax calculations and payments. It looks like any online business that doesn't collect sales tax fall under this law, but Amazon is by far the biggest business. The state has got to be losing a ton of money if only a fraction of people are paying the tax on their returns.

    It just seems like Amazon is getting to pretty much do whatever it wants. If CA adopted this law, I likely would never buy from any site that didn't collect sales tax. What a pain in the butt!
    Amazon tax bills come due
    S.C. buyers getting email reminders

    By David Slade
    dslade@postandcourier.com
    Saturday, January 28, 2012

    South Carolina residents who bought things last year from Amazon.com are now receiving emails reminding them that they owe the state money, because the online retailer didn't collect the sales taxes.

    While Amazon's customers might be surprised, South Carolina residents always have been required to pay tax on online purchases -- it's just a question of who collects the money. In practice, when it comes to declaring online purchases and paying the tax, consumers have been lax, costing the state an estimated $110 million annually.

    South Carolina shoppers have largely ignored the state tax on online purchases. Slightly more than 12,000 filers out of 2 million included the tax on their 2009 state form.

    "Honestly, I would say that most people don't know about it," said Anthony Freeman, an East Cooper accountant who owns A. Freeman Consulting and Tax Service. "But that doesn't mean they don't have to report it."

    Retailers that have websites as well as stores in the state -- such as Walmart, Lowe's and Barnes & Noble -- must collect tax on sales to South Carolina residents, but Amazon.com and websites with no physical business in the state don't have to collect the tax.

    Amazon fought a hard public battle last year to keep from having to collect South Carolina sales taxes, after announcing plans to build a distribution center in the state.

    The company received a five-year tax-collection exemption from the state, and as part of that legislative deal, was required to notify customers of the responsibility to pay tax.

    The law was written for Amazon but applies to any company that opens a distribution facility in South Carolina in 2011 or 2012 that involves a capital investment of at least $125 million and "creates at least two thousand full-time jobs and with a comprehensive health plan for those employees."

    Lawmakers required Amazon to tell South Carolina customers the amount of money for which they owe tax, but did not require Amazon to report that information to the state -- a point Amazon notes in its emails to customers.

    The company did not respond to a request for comment.

    "Amazon is not required to remit the use tax, but they are required to tell customers about the use tax," said state Department of Revenue spokeswoman Samantha Cheek. "Amazon does not report those figures to Department of Revenue."

    The easiest way for South Carolina residents to pay tax owed on online purchases is by declaring it on their annual income tax form.

    Residents have largely ignored the law, however. Out of more than 2 million South Carolina individual tax returns, just over 12,000 declared such taxes in 2009, the most recent year for which data was available.

    As a result, the state collected less than $1 million of an estimated $112 million owed in taxes on online purchases.

    State revenue and budget officials have not produced their own estimates, but the S.C. Budget and Control Board refers to a University of Tennessee study that estimated that South Carolina state and local governments would lose $110.8 million in 2011 and $124.5 million in 2012.

    Freeman said the emails from Amazon.com might increase tax collections by reminding people that taxes are owed and telling them the amount of purchases.

    "If they didn't send that out, most people would not know they had to report it," Freeman said.

    The notices will make it harder for taxpayers who shopped on Amazon.com to claim ignorance when they get to the "use tax" box on state income tax forms. Use tax is the official term for tax owed on goods purchased for use in South Carolina, if state and local sales taxes were not collected at the time.

    Amazon's exemption from collecting the South Carolina tax on sales was tied to the company's promise to invest in the state and create jobs, which the company did when its Lexington County distribution center opened last fall.

    This month, Amazon announced that it also will open a million-square-foot distribution center in Spartanburg this year, which "will create hundreds of new full time jobs and involve a $50 million investment in the state."
    Amazon tax bills come due | The Post and Courier - Charleston, South Carolina
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.