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Thread: Lisey's Story by Stephen King

  1. #11
    FORT Fogey famita's Avatar
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    I am in the midst of reading-my library is wonderful- and I am finding it hard to put down. I am finding it horribly enjoyable, if that makes sense.

  2. #12
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by famita;2162168;
    I am in the midst of reading-my library is wonderful- and I am finding it hard to put down. I am finding it horribly enjoyable, if that makes sense.
    So glad to see a new post in this thread! "Horribly enjoyable" makes perfect sense. You know, it's been well over a month since I finished Lisey's Story now but I still find myself thinking about it practically every day. Stephen King has said he thinks it is his best novel to date and you know what? He may be right.

    Here's a very interesting interview with Stephen about Lisey's Story and his writing in general: http://www.theage.com.au/news/books/a-sad-face-behind-the-scary-mask/2006/11/23/1163871548220.html One interesting tidbit I learned from the article: he started writing Lisey's Story just after he was diagnosed - and hospitalised with - severe pneumonia following his National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters acceptance speech. Anyone who's read the book will find this interesting as
    Click to see Spoiler:
    it is stated in the novel that when Scott died, the official cause of death was pneumonia. Obsessing about your own mortality much, Steve-O?


    Feel free to post your thoughts when you're finished, famita.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  3. #13
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl;2124022;
    One last thing, and I'll put this in spoiler tags just in case; it isn't a spoiler per se, but it does involve key plot points:
    Click to see Spoiler:
    an Amazon reviewer has pointed out that Scott's upbringing and back story brings to mind that of an actual modern day writer. Any idea who that writer may be? I know that James Ellroy had a very dark childhood filled with violence, but somehow I don't think it's him.
    I haven't read this yet, so I have no way of knowing, but
    Click to see Spoiler:
    judging by the general tone of his books, I've always had the notion that Dean Koontz had an abused childhood. A large number of his characters had, and mothers seem to tend towards the evil side. Just a thought.

    who's read the book will find this interesting as
    Click to see Spoiler:
    it is stated in the novel that when Scott died, the official cause of death was pneumonia. Obsessing about your own mortality much, Steve-O?
    Okay, as someone who's had
    Click to see Spoiler:
    pneumonia
    , I completely empathize .
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  4. #14
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus;2162190;
    I haven't read this yet, so I have no way of knowing, but
    Click to see Spoiler:
    judging by the general tone of his books, I've always had the notion that Dean Koontz had an abused childhood. A large number of his characters had, and mothers seem to tend towards the evil side. Just a thought.
    Interesting thought, Rattus! That particular writer's name (avoiding spoiler tags here ) actually popped up in my head when I posed the question. I haven't read enough of his work to be able to elaborate on your theory, though. Still, good theory.

    Okay, as someone who's had
    Click to see Spoiler:
    pneumonia
    , I completely empathize .
    Click to see Spoiler:
    Yep. I had pneumonia, in both of my lungs to boot, as a child and still shudder when I think about how horrible it was. I wouldn't wish that on anyone, especially not Stephen King.
    Unfortunately, his bout with
    Click to see Spoiler:
    pneumonia
    isn't the only time he's been ill in recent years. In the article talks about losing about 50 lbs following an illness. That explains why he looked so fragile when I met him. He has completely lost that sturdy-looking Irish thing he had going pre-accident.
    Last edited by totoro; 12-02-2006 at 08:01 PM.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  5. #15
    FORT Fogey famita's Avatar
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    By the way, GTG, I was totally jealous to hear you were actually face-to-face with him. I would have felt like I died and gone to heaven! I read at night, fall asleep, and pretty much dream about what I'd read! It's been kind of creepy. I am usually a fast reader, but have found myself reading something and then contemplating what was written. The whole concept of this book is mind-boggling to me. I can't wait to see how it ends, which hopefully will be tonight.

  6. #16
    Premium Member glennajo's Avatar
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    I'm about half way through this one, and I found the first one hundred pages or so kind of confusing. Now I just can't put it down. I should be able to finish it this weekend. So far it has been great.

    I started the DT series when I was in my teens, and I just couldn't get into the first book. I've been thinking about going back and trying again. I can't remember if that series was scary or not. I tend to read at night and then have nightmares... Lately I've stuck to his not-so-scary books.

  7. #17
    FORT Fogey famita's Avatar
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    ok, I am absolutely in love with SK. He is my hero and the epitome of "author". Unlike some of you I did not see the "downtrodden" Lisey. I thought her character was completely engaging. She knew what she wanted to do with her life as a wife, and then finally as a widow. I think this book is my new "The Stand".

  8. #18
    FORT Fogey Harvest's Avatar
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    Say, if I had 20 million in the bank, I wouldn't work either, and I don't think it would make me less than complete as a person, lol. The thought of what she was doing outside the focus of the novel never crossed my mind. I think his choices of what to include in this book were perfect, a very mature work. I'm grateful he is still writing generously (unlike some famous writers who just bang out what amounts to 120-page screenplay treatments for the paycheck. The only nod I saw in that direction was that he made Lisey "too thin" so she could be played by any actress if the book were to be optioned for a movie.)

    Mostly I have always loved King's work, but never really liked The Stand/Dark Tower stuff. So I'm glad he has given us a hefty new novel in the vein I prefer - contrasting the humanity of the characters with his Maine mythos as it has built up over the decades. Did you all think that snowstorm in 1996 was the Storm of the Century (admit I'm too lazy to look up the date on that, but I'll bet it was)?

    As for whoever mentioned there is not a lot of explanation for the long boy and the laughers, I don't think there has to be, because King's entire catalog of stories basically provides the back story. The early stories (including short stories) were especially clear about how he was working from a Lovecraftian premise, and he has been building on it ever since.

    The last part of the book, "Lisey's Story," made me think not of which "real life author" may have been abused as a child, but rather made me think back to The Shining. This new novel revisits that father-son-murder territory, and it resonated for me in terms of King's work, not in terms of anything outside the pages of the stories.

    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl;2162188;
    Stephen King has said he thinks it is his best novel to date and you know what? He may be right.
    Last edited by Harvest; 12-28-2006 at 01:21 PM.

  9. #19
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    I'm a few chapters into this one - not a real page-turner like Cell, but the story is starting to get under my skin, and the character of Lisey is really starting to grow on me. I disliked her at first, and thought Scott was great - now I feel the exact opposite. I'm going to finish it and then check back in here - all these spoiler tags are far too tempting.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
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  10. #20
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
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    Re: Lisey's Story by Stephen King

    I started reading this recently, and - wow, I really hate it. I hate the way everyone talks in it. I hate "smucking". The blood bool? Stupid. The way the sisters interact? Awful.

    I feel like I ought to finish it, ought to give it a chance to grab me, particularly after reading in this thread that people whose opinions I respect liked it so much, but I am seriously, seriously hating this smucking book.

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