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Thread: The Chronicles of Narnia

  1. #11
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phat32 View Post
    I'm about halfway in the series, currently reading Prince Caspian. It's...good. I like how Lewis kept the concept of Narnia fresh as the series progressed, and how the returns to Narnia seem both believable and--I hesitate to use this work to describe a work of fantasy--logical.

    I was completely captivated by The Horse and His Boy, although I think the anti-Islam message could not have been more blatant and detracted from my enjoyment of what was otherwise a very good fantasy tale.



    Hilarious and oh so true! I hear Lemony Snickett's voice every time I run across a passage like that in Lewis's work.
    I'm glad that you're having such a good time with Chronicles, phat32. And I'm also glad that you, too, enjoy Lewis' allowing the reader to fill in the descriptions. Rather than "she took the silver apple, bit into it's juicy flesh and flavours of melon-strawberry-grapes filled her mouth", I feel that's it's far more magical for him to have said, "she took the silver apple, bit into it's juicy flesh and (well, if you've ever got the chance to try them yourself, you will know what Lucy tasted.)" It almost reads as if Lewis were The Professor, with his insider knowledge of Narnia, and is retelling the story for us, his surrogate kids.

    I'm also glad that the film is still doing so well at the box office.
    Still crazy, after all these shears

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  2. #12
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lambikins View Post
    It almost reads as if Lewis were The Professor, with his insider knowledge of Narnia, and is retelling the story for us, his surrogate kids.
    Great analogy, lambikins! That's how I've always seen it, too. To me, that's part of the appeal. I must admit I haven't read the books in the last, oh, fifteen, sixteen years or so (suddenly I'm feeling a bit old ), but I LOVED them as a kid and when I was old enough to do so, I read them aloud to my younger brother and sister, who were equally enchanted by the land of Narnia. When I eventually have kids, I'll definitely read the books to them.

    (Very off-topic, but suddenly a very frightening thought occurred to me. What if - the horror! - I should give birth to children who loathe reading? My God, I'd need therapy )
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  3. #13
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl View Post
    Great analogy, lambikins! That's how I've always seen it, too. To me, that's part of the appeal. I must admit I haven't read the books in the last, oh, fifteen, sixteen years or so (suddenly I'm feeling a bit old ), but I LOVED them as a kid and when I was old enough to do so, I read them aloud to my younger brother and sister, who were equally enchanted by the land of Narnia. When I eventually have kids, I'll definitely read the books to them.

    (Very off-topic, but suddenly a very frightening thought occurred to me. What if - the horror! - I should give birth to children who loathe reading? My God, I'd need therapy )
    That kind of thinking terrified ME, too, g.t.g.. So much so, that I opted 'out' on having kids because I had completely convinced myself that my kids would turn out "anti-environment/anti-reading/anti-animal" and I couldn't love anyone like that. So, I did the next best thing and volunteered as a Big Sister for several decades and also at a Domestic Abuse Shelter where the kids were so starved for affection that I never got a "Borrrring!" response from them.

    I'm glad that you liked my analogy, since your opinion in the BOOKS section is so highly revered AND you're a Post of the Week winner! I feel like I should say to you, "I'm not worthy! I'm not worthy!"

    I'm really looking forward to seeing your opinions on the book for this month!
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  4. #14
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    I'm still making my way slowly but surely through the Chronicles and finished Prince Caspian last night.

    It was another good 'un, and I have two immediate reactions:

    #1: All hail the Bulgy Bears!

    #2: For a writer who is so closely identified with Christianity, Lewis suuure wrote a lot about paganism and witchcraft in this installment, all that "wood nymphs" and "dancing with dryads" stuff. It didn't bother me in the least. (In fact, I found it fit right into the tone of Narnia.) I just found it odd.
    Last edited by phat32; 02-09-2006 at 10:39 AM.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things don’t always soften the bad things, but...the bad things don’t always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  5. #15
    FORT Fogey lambikins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phat32 View Post
    I'm still making my way slowly but surely through the Chronicles and finished Prince Caspian last night.

    It was another good 'un, and I have two immediate reactions:

    #1: All hail the Bulgy Bears!

    #2: For a writer who is so closely identified with Christianity, Lewis suuure wrote a lot about paganism and witchcraft in this installment, all that "wood nymphs" and "dancing with dryads" stuff. It didn't bother me in the least. (In fact, I found it fit right into the tone of Narnia.) I just found it odd.
    Oh, dear phat32, I didn't find it one bitty-bit of odd. This may be my misperceptions, but it seems that the earlier authors were Uber-Educated (as opposed to the drug-addled authors of today that barely made it out of high school). Lewis, before his mother died of cancer at age 10, grew up in a wonderous family home, called Little Lea,which was a large, gabled house with dark, narrow passages and an overgrown garden, very similar to the homes he puts his characters in, in NARNIA. There was also a library that was crammed with books—two of Jack's favorites were Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson and The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett, both very escapist and fantasy oriented books.

    Lewis did a stint in WWI, and following his return, Lewis returned to Oxford, where he took up his studies again with great enthusiasm. In 1925, after graduating with first-class honors in Greek and Latin Literature, Philosophy and Ancient History, and English Literature, Lewis was elected to an important teaching post in English at Magdalen College, Oxford. He remained at Oxford for 29 years before becoming a professor of Medieval and Renaissance literature at Magdalene College, Cambridge, in 1955. All of the highlighted areas above are riddled with nymphs, dryads, and pagan images, since those images WERE the "Gods" at that time. He wrote WARDROBE in 1950 and finished the last chapter, THE LAST BATTLE, in 1956, so he was still teaching Romance Literature during this time.

    Although he was raised as a Christian by his parents, he abandoned it when he was a teenager (typical), saying "Christianity was a kind of . . . nonsense into which humanity tended to blunder." One of his teachers in Uni was a staunch Atheist, and he encouraged Lewis to 'think for himself.' He returned to Christianity in his 30's but still liked a lively debate about it.

    So, his Irish Stew of an Education led to the marvelous creation of NARNIA: Wood Nymphs, Santa Claus and Resurrection themes resplendent!

    I personally love the fact that an author can encorporate so many different beliefs into one work of fiction. Woe to us that kids have such an incomplete education, nowadays.

    I got important dates from HERE: http://www.factmonster.com/spot/narnia-lewis.html
    Still crazy, after all these shears

    "lambikins, put the crack pipe down and back away from the keyboard." Unklescott

    "lambikins... I have come to the conclusion that you are the Jedi Master of the Kitchen on FORT!" SuperBrat

  6. #16
    FORT Fan Shaybo's Avatar
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    I've read the CoN and its great for an older person, but not for a four year old. I've also read A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, and A Swiftly Tilting Planet those were great chronicle books, but also not good for young kids.Because one violence and two very scientific. I have one suggestion and that is go to your local book store or got to your library and see if there any books that are good for your four year old.
    There is only one happiness in life, to love and be loved- George Sand

  7. #17
    FORT Fanatic Kay118's Avatar
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    I read all seven of them years ago. The one that I liked best was "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" and the only one in the series that I've read more than once.

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