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Thread: The Book That Changed Your Life

  1. #61
    PWS
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    Good grief, bbnbama! I've got tears welling up just reading what you wrote about The Kissing Hand! What a great idea....too bad my kids are a bit past that age now!
    Not surprised it affected you that way... putting them on the bus for that first day of "real" school, especially the first child, is I think harder on the parents than the kids, knowing we won't be there to protect them. Sniffle. Just curious if you told your child the story? Definitely one that might make one's life easier.

  2. #62
    Rock Stars! bbnbama's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PWS View Post
    Good grief, bbnbama! I've got tears welling up just reading what you wrote about The Kissing Hand! What a great idea....too bad my kids are a bit past that age now!
    Not surprised it affected you that way... putting them on the bus for that first day of "real" school, especially the first child, is I think harder on the parents than the kids, knowing we won't be there to protect them. Sniffle. Just curious if you told your child the story? Definitely one that might make one's life easier.
    As a matter of fact PWS, right after the teacher read that story my son and I went to the bookstore the next day and bought that book and I read it to him almost every night before he went to sleep. My son never had a hard time going to school..as a matter of fact on his first day he walked down the hall by himself to the classroom and never once looked back at me!

    Unfortunately tho, my son doesn't share my love of books! He takes after his dad on that
    Reality is the beginning...not the end....Wallace Stevens

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbnbama View Post
    As a matter of fact PWS, right after the teacher read that story my son and I went to the bookstore the next day and bought that book and I read it to him almost every night before he went to sleep. My son never had a hard time going to school..as a matter of fact on his first day he walked down the hall by himself to the classroom and never once looked back at me!

    Unfortunately tho, my son doesn't share my love of books! He takes after his dad on that
    Now there's a good news/bad news post if I ever saw one! But back to the actual topic of the thread....
    On a somewhat lesser life changing point, I've always loved "historical" novels because they change the way I look at past events. Exodus is one I remember opening up a whole new part of the world to me.

  4. #64
    FORT Fogey Add It Up Champion famita's Avatar
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    My absolute favorite (as a parent) was "Love You Forever", which I received after having my first son. I would read it to my kids at least once a week, and would cry everytime.

    My first that I remember was a Robt Heinlein book about a martian who sat and ate red ants. I always swear I'll read it again so I know if I actually remember it. and compare it to a 6 year old mind and memory.

    My favorite authors have been Stephen King and Dean R Koontz. I thank both for scaring the bejeebies out of me and making me think. I also loved Isaac Asimov for his "Foundation" series.

  5. #65
    FORT Fanatic anemone's Avatar
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    Wow. This thread is quite a testament to the power of the written word.

    My story is much smaller in scope than most of yours, I am ashamed to admit. Reading was a private pleasure for me growing up. I am the youngest girl in a large family, ninth child out of eleven, and I was and still am pretty introverted. I read for pure entertainment, adventure and escape.

    The book that changed my life was The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton. It could have been any book, but that was the one. My older sister was in Jr. High and it was assigned reading for her. I was still in elementary school, maybe 2nd grade. She let me read it. Then we talked about it. So simple. It changed how I saw books - that I could share what I read and loved. I started really exploring what I was reading, looking for meaning, making me think. No more "baby" books for me. More importantly, it changed my relationship with my sister. I was less the pain-in-the-butt baby sister and more someone with a view and opinion. It established her as the sister with whom I could discuss anything. We shared almost every book from then on - a 2-person book club.

  6. #66
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    The book that changed my life was Miriam's Song, by Mark and Miriam Mathabane. It's the sequel to the book Kaffir boy, and it's a true story.

    For those of you not familiar with these books, the Mathabane family was a black family growing up in South Africa in the 1970's and 1980's, when Apartheid was still a major problem. This book chronicles Miriam's life from when she was starting school (at 5) to her Boyfriend raping her at 15, to her family getting a real house, to her journey to America in her 20's.

    It's really am amazing book, and it changed my life because, as a caucasian girl who was born in America, it really gave me a look at what life is really like outside of the seemingly 'perfect' country. I'm not really an emotional person, but I found myself crying throughout the entire book.

    I give it 5 stars, because you can vividly picture everything that's happening, and it is very good at showing you the emotions her family went through.
    ...And the strange boy continued to weave in and out of her life, leaving her with a sense of wonder and amazment, but also, a feeling of loss, knowing that life might never be the same again.

  7. #67
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11sstephanie;2116027;
    The book that changed my life was Miriam's Song, by Mark and Miriam Mathabane. It's the sequel to the book Kaffir boy, and it's a true story.
    sstephanie, Kaffir Boy really moved me. I read it a long time ago but I've never forgotten it. I enjoy reading biographies about people who overcome great odds to achieve their goals. I didn't know there was a sequel - thanks for letting me know. I'll check at the library for Miriam's Song.
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  8. #68
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    Kaffir Boy is an incredible book The first time I read it, I remember feeling both horrified and grateful at the same time: horrifed at what so many have had to live through and grateful for my own good fortune. I read his second book as well - the one that covers the time after he came to the US to go to college. I didn't know about Miriam's Song - I'll have to look for it
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  9. #69
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anemone;2111455;
    The book that changed my life was The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton.
    I loved S.E. Hinton in junior high as well. Still have a copy of That Was Then, This Is Now, as a matter of fact. I remember how thrilled I was when I found out the author was a "she" - up to then, my main experience with female authors was Lucy Maud Montgomery and Judy Blume. Not that there's anything wrong with those authors, I've read and loved their work all my life. But it didn't occur to me that a woman could write such gritty, emotional stories, and even from a male's perspective.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
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  10. #70
    Winter get away catmom3's Avatar
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    I just found this thread and was so happy to see many of my favorite books metioned.
    For me The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton was the first book that really impacted my life. The Red Badge of Courage was one that was assigned in 7th grade and it really brought home to me that war is never pretty, adventureous, or exciting. Of coarse I read all the Judy Blume books as well as Laura Ingalls Wilder. Those books really turned me into a pleasure reader and even today I read books like some people drink water, thirst needs wetting.
    The book from my adult hood is The Great Train Robbery. Since then I have been really drawn to British history and life. I'm still more of a pleasure reader though.

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