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Thread: Not-so-Classic Classics

  1. #31
    Just Forting Around roseskid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoneGrrrl
    I'm so-so on Hemingway: I loved the Sun Also Rises but hated The Old Man and the Sea.
    I also hated The Old Man and the Sea, but loved A Farewell to Arms.
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  2. #32
    Laughing like a fool UHID's Avatar
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    I'm with you guys on Hemmingway. I just finished reading For Whom The Bell Tolls, and I really just don't get what all the fuss is about. Apart from a couple random pages that are really beautifully written, I found it pretty boring.

    I am a big Hardy fan, though. I loved Tess of the D'Urbervilles, and thought that Jude the Obscure was good as well.

    As for another grossly overated book, this one is not really a 'classic', but overated nonetheless. Has anyone else read the book Fall on your Knees by Anne-Marie MacDonald? I'd heard so many good things about it, so I finally read it. I thought it was ridiculous. I'd heard people talk about how 'real' the characters were, but I really just didn't think they came alive at all. And call me crazy, but incest and adultery aren't generally what I'm looking for in my reading.
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  3. #33
    Nevermind Lotuslander's Avatar
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    I liked Fall on Your Knees, but I didn't buy ( Francis's? ) jazz baby stripper thing at all. Not in that era, in that place.

  4. #34
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    I just read The World According to Garp, and several other novels by John Irving. They were recommended by a friend who thinks he is the best thing ever. I must say, I wasn't too thrilled. I think by the last several chapters, I was starting to appreciate the novel a bit, but for much of the book, I was perplexed and a bit disturbed. Maybe it's not quite a classic yet (?--how would you define "classic")

    And just to add in, I love Heart of Darkness by Conrad, but the love grew after several years of careful re-readings. Also, The Mill on the Floss is one of my all-time favourites.

  5. #35
    FORT Fogey
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    Not-so-Classic Classics
    1984 - I'm not so sure this counts as a work of fiction. Seriously, I don't get the point of this novel. A novel about Communism? Great. Basically repeating the real story using pigs? Not my cuppa.

    Not-Yet-Classic Not-So-Classic
    The Life of Pi - This book starts off great but its like the author didn't notice his book digressed from interesting to derranged. I'm not sure if anybody else here has read it, but about 3/5 of the way through it just goes odd. The theme changes, and its just weird.

  6. #36
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    Re John Irving - love him but I would hesitate to call his work classic. It's original, well-written fiction, and he has a talent for exploring dark themes that moves readers deeply without being overly depressing or ponderous. My personal favourite is Cider House Rules (*makes note to self to re-read it, it's been awhile), but Garp could possibly be called a modern classic - although there's plenty of death and hearbreak, it's also somehow full of life, energy and wit.
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  7. #37
    CCL
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    [QUOTE=-ANTM-]Not-so-Classic Classics
    1984 - I'm not so sure this counts as a work of fiction. Seriously, I don't get the point of this novel. A novel about Communism? Great. Basically repeating the real story using pigs? Not my cuppa.

    ANTM, I think you mean Animal Farm? Did you hate the book so much you've blocked out the name for it?
    Animal Farm was ok but 1984 was better.

  8. #38
    FORT Fogey
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    Haha, I realized this a little while ago and was just coming to correct myself but I got caught! Oh well - you're right. I do mean Animal Farm. I liked 1984 - it was more creative and had more of a theme to it. Animal Farm was just sort of like reading a History book with pigs.

  9. #39
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    Wow! I think I like almost all of the books listed! Well, except for anything by Hemingway and Middlemarch, which I made several passes at before realizing that I didn't care!

    I LOVE Austen and Hardy. I love that I can read Hardy and still *gasp* and be shocked by his plot turns. Austen is like an old friend. I don't even tell people how many times I've read Pride & Prejudice and Persuasion. It borders on obsessive. I'm one of the only people I know who's read both Anna Karenina and War & Peace for fun.... and loved them both! Don't get me started on John Irving - I worship him. A Prayer for Owen Meaney is my favorite book, but I love Garp and Cider House Rules (and all the others) too.

    My list of not-so classics would include the aforementioned Middlemarch as well as Vanity Fair and Great Expectations... I've made multiple tries with each of those and just never got hooked. I've got a copy of Ulysses that I'm contemplating taking a stab at. Depending on how that goes, I may be back
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  10. #40
    CCL
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    Critical - you don't like Vanity Fair!?! I'm so disappointed in you. Nah, I just love V.F. immensely. Middlemarch was good (in parts) but I find I don't really like Eliot's writing style, so that precludes my totally loving her work (I have the same reaction to Atwood).
    Good luck with Ulysses!

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