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Thread: Not-so-Classic Classics

  1. #21
    FORT Fogey nausicaa's Avatar
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    How anyone could not like Steinbeck is beyond me.... He's like your lovable, sensitive Marxist uncle who talks about proleteriats like they're puppies.

    Social realism...aww.

  2. #22
    FORT Fogey veejer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katelyn&Carmen
    I just recently read Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad for my AP English class. Ugh-- I hated it. It took me forever to read a single page in that book because Conrad does not waste a single word. I think the thing that made me hate it so much was that we have to focus on details in that class and his whole book is nothing but description. I spent too long trying to figure out what's important and solving some of his puzzling sentences than I did just enjoying the story. I will forever be haunted by that stupid rivets description after having to write a mini-essay on the importance of that passage.


    I keep telling my daughter that when she hits writers that use "stream of consciousness" she's got a leg up on her classmates as that is how my MIL writes everything.

    When we get to get together this Saturday we're going to do ABC, but perhaps that won't work because ......, so instead maybe we should ......, on the other hand it would be better to .........., so we'll definitely do XYZ.
    "Fish are friends, not food, but everything else is fair game." ~ Pating, Survivor Cagayan Pool

  3. #23
    Mixing Old Fashioneds PhoneGrrrl's Avatar
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    I'm so-so on Hemingway: I loved the Sun Also Rises but hated The Old Man and the Sea. (Maybe impotent man and a woman and her flock of gay men are just more interesting to me than a guy and a boat and a fish. )

    In college I took a whole class on the Dickensian era, and the only 2 that I could not get into were Wuthering Heights (I wanted each and every character to die a horrible and painful death) and Great Expectations. All the other--Mill on the Floss, The Moonstone, David Copperfield--loved them all, though I'd originally only taken the class to finish out my English minor.

    But the writer that I absolutely cannot stand is William Faulkner. I find everything he writes utterly pointless. I'm sure there are people who love him, but try as I might, there's nothing that I can tolerate.

  4. #24
    FORT Fogey Salome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boredom
    OH MY GOSH! I'm so unbelievably stupid! Now I wish I could edit my post... I don't know why I always get those two confused */threadjack*
    Naw, names are just names. You show fine taste!


    Quote Originally Posted by nausicaa
    How anyone could not like Steinbeck is beyond me.... He's like your lovable, sensitive Marxist uncle who talks about proleteriats like they're puppies.
    My grandpa's first wife was remarried to one of John Steinbeck's cousins. Now how cool am I?

  5. #25
    FORT Fogey nausicaa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salome
    My grandpa's first wife was remarried to one of John Steinbeck's cousins. Now how cool am I?
    That is a neat little bit of family trivia. Keep it, for posterity's sake. (Though my friend would oneup you in six-degrees-of-separationship: she is directly descended from an obscure Malaysian royal house. We checked. )

    But the writer that I absolutely cannot stand is William Faulkner. I find everything he writes utterly pointless. I'm sure there are people who love him, but try as I might, there's nothing that I can tolerate.
    again. You brute, hating Faulkner.

    (And you, an English minor! )

  6. #26
    FORT Fogey Salome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nausicaa
    That is a neat little bit of family trivia. Keep it, for posterity's sake. (Though my friend would oneup you in six-degrees-of-separationship: she is directly descended from an obscure Malaysian royal house. We checked. )
    I only mentioned it, because I was thinking that Steinbeck is my "Marxist uncle" in a very indirect sense. I have other indirect and less-indirect connections I could amaze you with, but I'll save them for another time.

    I never fell in love with Lord of the Flies, Fahrenheit 451, or Animal Farm. "Quaffable, but far from transcendent." I think To Kill A Mockingbird is good, though surely overrated. How could it not be?

  7. #27
    Peppermint Patterson EVOO's Avatar
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    I enjoy Steinbeck novels, Grapes of Wrath being my favorite...followed closely by Of Mice and Men and East of Eden. I didn't care too much for The Pearl or Cannery Row though...however it's been YEARS since I read those. I just got GOW recently.
    "I only run if I'm being chased" (Dominique- Making the Band 3)

  8. #28
    FORT Newbie Verg's Avatar
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    Anna Karenina. Tolstoy.

    Tedious, this was.

    Picked this up for school and when I got sick of it the teacher wouldn't let me change it.

    I mean, I do realize people actually enjoy reading this book, but honestly, what a HASSLE! It practically bored me to tears.

  9. #29
    Under Investigation Tirlittan's Avatar
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    I was going to vote for Anna Karenina, too. My husband refers to Anna Karenina as "Russian Soap Opera." Granted, I was under 20 when I read it, so I might have to give it a new try now. Maybe there were layers I was not able to recognize back then? But yes, Anna Karenina was the best sleep medicine ever.
    ps. This is just my opinion in the matter.

  10. #30
    FORT Fogey Salome's Avatar
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    Okay, this isn't really a classic, but it's been popular lately, so I must mention it... Memoirs of a Geisha

    The book is not particularly studied nor well-written, but it's easy to read and plays on the Asian-woman-as-geisha fetish and becomes a best seller. I read the entire book and came to the conclusion that this must be the story's selling point. The protagonist (Sayuri, I assume?) is passive throughout; she undergoes no change, even by the conclusion.

    In the end, I wasn't necessarily offended by this, just disappointed. I mean, it was a okay read: I learned a few things, the quiet pace was nice... But why really is this book so attractive? If people are genuinely interested in learning about Japan, that's great, but there are better books and many neglected dimensions to the culture.

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