+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower Spoiler Thread

  1. #1
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Small Town USA
    Age
    55
    Posts
    4,067

    Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower Spoiler Thread

    Warning to all who enter: this is a spoiler thread. A short description of the book can be found at http:www.Amazon.com:

    Book Description


    All good things must come to an end, Constant Reader, and not even Stephen King can make a story that goes on forever. The tale of Roland Deschain's relentless quest for the Dark Tower has, the author fears, sorely tried the patience of those who have followed it from its earliest chapters. But attend to it a while longer, if it pleases you, for this volume is the last, and often the last things are best.

    Roland's ka-tet remains intact, though scattered over wheres and whens. Susannah-Mia has been carried from the Dixie Pig (in the summer of 1999) to a birthing room -- really a chamber of horrors -- in Thunderclap's Fedic; Jake and Father Callahan, with Oy between them, have entered the restaurant on Lex and Sixty-first with weapons drawn, little knowing how numerous and noxious are their foes. Roland and Eddie are with John Cullum in Maine, in 1977, looking for the site on Turtleback Lane where "walk-ins" have been often seen. They want desperately to get back to the others, to Susannah especially, and yet they have come to realize that the world they need to escape is the only one that matters.

    Thus the book opens, like a door to the uttermost reaches of Stephen King's imagination. You've come this far. Come a little farther. Come all the way. The sound you hear may be the slamming of the door behind you. Welcome to The Dark Tower.


    Wow. Words can't do justice to the book. The ending just blew me away. To have it end the same way it began was the only real ending that would've worked. Not at all what I expected; but fitting nonetheless.

    What do you think?
    Well I was born in a small town
    And I can breathe in a small town
    Gonna die in this small town
    And that's prob'ly where they'll bury me

  2. #2
    Soon summer soon BlondieGirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Jersey
    Age
    43
    Posts
    1,017
    Thanks dinahann, for posting this spoiler thread.

    OK, I need to get this out.

    I LOVE this series and I'm soooooooooo sad that it is over. But the fact that it loops and loops over and over where Roland, actually begs for mercy, thinking "No, not again" or something like that. Oh. Wow. I couldnt believe it and still cant. I hope Roland finally can defeat having to loop. Maybe because he picked up the bugle? Perhaps this time his quest can end? There is so much to discuss, I hardly know where to start.
    "Pluck not the wayside flower..." William Allingham

  3. #3
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Playing kickball for the beer
    Age
    38
    Posts
    8,870
    Finally!! I finished it!
    When Roland entered the tower and we flipped to Susannah and I thought it was the end, I thought, "Well, ok. That's a cop-out, not telling us what's in that tower, but it's ok." Because I think King is great at build-up but his denouments often are a bit disappointing. But I was wrong anyway, since as you all know that was not the end. I haven't decided quite what I think of the loop Roland's on -- it makes it feel a bit as if all those sacrifices were for nothing. And I didn't get WHY he'd be on such a loop. Does he have to save the Tower by continually searching for it? Maybe I'm just dense. Or maybe it was 2 a.m.
    But overall I'm ok with that ending -- even though it's not completely satisfying, I can't imagine any other ending that would be either. And I think it rather fits in with the whole idea of King putting himself as the writer in the book, because when one reader finishes this last book, there's always someone to loop around and pick up "The Gunslinger" again and start reading it.
    I also was glad he gave Susannah and Eddie and Jake a happy ending. I always liked them better than I did Roland.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  4. #4
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Small Town USA
    Age
    55
    Posts
    4,067
    Roland referred to his journey to the Dark Tower as ka - something he must do - and to his fellow gunslingers as a ka-tet; I felt that ka meant his destiny, and the ka-tet was a sort of spiritual force banded together to meet and fulfill destiny. He also spoke of ka being like a wheel.

    When I was younger (much) I read tarot cards for fun. The Wheel of Fortune from the tarot deck reminds me of Roland's ka. The meaning of the card is "that which was, is, and shall be remains the same, so that one must be alert to unexpected opportunity". I never understood the meaning of the card which is why I memorized it. I had trouble wrapping my head around the notion that something could be imuteable - unchanging, yet you still had to be on the lookout for your destiny and careful in choosing your actions. It always seemed to me that you could be a lump on a log and whatever would happen to you would happen regardless of whether you did anything or not.

    King hinted in the end that the horn may make things different for Roland the next time. But it may not; that's why his ka is like a wheel. He must always be alert to unexpected opportunity in the hopes that this time it will be different.

  5. #5
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hi, Olivia!
    Posts
    2,312
    In the end, King's masterpiece ran away from him; it’s obvious not only in his doppelganger/character's voice, but also in his all-seeing Narrator's voice. King lost control of his plot and characters somewhere between Song of Susannah and The Dark Tower and blames it on the story taking on a life of its own. It’s not the first time he’s made that claim. It rings a little more hollow each time.

    I was sad to see that King took a spiteful, almost gleeful approach to killing off Eddie, Jake and Oy, as if he sought to disappoint and horrify his “Constant Readers,” who have spent years (literally decades) patiently waiting out King's Dark Tower series.

    While at first King was probably flattered and a little amused at all the attention given to a series he began in college on a lark, by the end, all the begging and threats and questions about the Dark Tower must have been psychosis-inducing, probably to the point where King couldn't continue. After all, as any fan knows, there are notable time gaps between many of the novels.

    Just as Roland's Dark Tower became Roland's personal hell, so did King's quest for the Tower become King's hell. (It's worth noting that King's word for an Almighty Creation Force is "Gan"--"nag" spelled backwards.)

    As for the character deaths themselves, Jake and Eddie's deaths weren't totally unexpected by this point. Sacrifice plays a large role in the Dark Tower series.

    King seemed to argue that someone had to pay for the restoration of the Beams and who better than Eddie Dean, who lost sight of the Beam(s) as a junkie but later regained his grace by following them?

    One of the cruelest deaths had to be Jake's--here was a character who only wanted the love and approval of Roland, and it's this approval-seeking that sets the stage for his destruction.

    Jake spends four novels convinced that one day, Roland will again let him die. If any of the characters can be said to represent ka, it's Jake, whose life is like a wheel. He dies once, is reborn into Roland's world, dies again in Roland's world, and is reborn yet again in his own world.

    By the time he rejoins Roland, Jake is convinced he will die again because of Roland's machinations, although he's wrong to think death will come while he's alone, his back to a locked door (harking back to The Waste Lands). It's an even crueler joke, though, that Jake again dies his first death (struck by a car) and his second death (a death due to Roland's failure).

    The worst part about Jake’s death is dying to save the sorry life of the Stephen King character because Character King doesn't deserve Jake's sacrifice--like Aaron Deepneau, he's cowardly and does little to look after his own skin, even when others make immeasurable sacrifices to save him.

    The only character to receive any sort of justice is Susannah. Note that the only reason Susannah lives after her quest for the Dark Tower is because on the verge of seeing the Dark Tower, she had the ability and the courage to make a choice between Love and the Tower. She chooses Love and turns from the Dark Tower.

    Roland made the same choice a long time ago, and his choice for the Tower is the ultimate irony: he is obsessed with his own damnation, and we learn the Tower is a todash--it offers no light, love or life.

    Where Roland may foresee his own death and/or the deaths of his companions and marches onward to his damnation anyway, it could be argued that Susannah foresees her own death (at the very least, no place for her in Roland's plans, once he reaches the Tower) and chooses her own fate, denying the madness of the Tower quest and instead taking a chance on regaining love at the risk of todash oblivion. By making that leap of faith, by showing the ability to make a choice at all (unlike Roland), she is rewarded by Narrator King.

    Finally, Roland begging Susannah to accompany him the rest of the way to the Tower may seem out of character until one considers that had he convinced Susannah to go to the Tower, then events most likely would have unfolded differently for him, and somehow (in his "undermind," maybe) Roland knew it.

    With Susannah at his side as he reached the top of the Tower, it is unlikely that his cycle of damnation would have begun again. (After all, Susannah was not at his side as he pursued the man in black across the desert.)

    This is, perhaps, what may have freed Roland from his hell once and for all had he been successful--the love of a companion willing to take the final leap of faith, a companion Roland did not destroy or abandon in his mad quest for the Tower.

    Finally, in a very sly, very calculated wink to the reader, King argues that Roland is engaged in his eternal hell only because of us Constant Readers. Show of hands--how many of you thought, "Hey, when this series is over, I can go back and read the entire thing, FRONT TO BACK?"

    Just as King the Writer has a role to play in what happens to Roland, Constant Reader has a role to play—finishing The Dark Tower and opening the first page of The Gunslinger all over again and coming upon this familiar line: "The man in black fled across the desert, and the Gunslinger followed."
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things don’t always soften the bad things, but...the bad things don’t always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  6. #6
    eny
    eny is offline
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    10,476
    I am having one hell of a time reading this. I'm getting so p'od at King. I feel like he is mocking us with every sentence. It's "Ha Ha these are my characters not yours and I can make them do anything or have anything happen to them". How can you argue ? Are you Stephen King ? No - so he is intimating that even though some of us do have decades wrapped up in this story, we have to just sit down, shut up and deal with what he is doing.

    Just a few chapters in we get a glimpse of Randall Flagg. I hate Randall Flagg. I'm hoping that somehow Abagail Freemantle will come to calm me.

    King himself has said he likes to "burn things down". It looks like to finally rid himself of Roland , he is doing just that. I don't know when I'm going to finish this.
    Last edited by eny; 11-06-2004 at 11:38 PM.

  7. #7
    Soon summer soon BlondieGirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Jersey
    Age
    43
    Posts
    1,017
    I thought the Crimson King going "EEEEEEEEE! EEEEEEEEEEEE EEEEEEE!" was ridiculous. You expected more and you got an old man throwing sneetches and throwing a tantrum. Not the way I envisioned him.

    I feel so bad the Roland has to repeat the cycle all over again. When will his quest end? Its terrible.

    But a big sigh of relief that Eddie, Jake, and Susannah are together again in a new world. I believe Oy is suppossed to join them?
    "Pluck not the wayside flower..." William Allingham

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.