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Thread: Lit 101

  1. #61
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnowflakeGirl
    Mariner, I wasn't assigned any Plath or Anne Sexton in school, I read those on my own, "for fun." I guess that should tell you what kind of a pre-teen I was.
    Snowy I read Plath for fun too. I didn't get assigned it in school, so I read my brother's copy of The Bell Jar. He said I could keep it and I still have it.

    (I was also the kind of teenager that wore black all the time and wrote bleak poetry in the back of my notebook during biology class. In between cigarette breaks behind the school. )
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  2. #62
    Being VIP Yardgnome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy
    When I was in high school we had to memorize the prologue to the Canterbury Tales, in Middle English, and recite it. I still remember a lot of it. We read a few of the more PG tales then, but I also took a whole semester of Chaucer in college. My professor looked like Santa Claus, and he would read some parts out loud, and it was very jarring to hear Santa reciting the Wife of Bath's Tale.
    We had to do the same thing, I also still remeber most of it. Whan that aparilla.....

  3. #63
    FORT Fogey Salome's Avatar
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    Plath in junior high? Snowflake Girl, you must have been so precocious.
    I was still reading vampire novels at twelve, but I became interested in poetry in high school, especially poetry of the confessional style. Sylvia Plath is still my favorite poet, with T.S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, and Federico García Lorca following close behind. I'm not a huge fan of Anne Sexton or The Bell Jar, but once enjoyed those as well. (Perhaps "enjoyed" isn't the right word. Wallowed with them in my teenage angst?)

  4. #64
    Picture Perfect SnowflakeGirl's Avatar
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    Exactly, Salome, "enjoy" isn't quite the precise word for the satisfaction that comes from such angsty works.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariner
    Hmmm. Why does the word moody come to mind?
    Well, let's just say I wasn't a cheerleader. From the sound of it, I'd have been hanging out behind the school with AJane!
    Sending good vibes and warm fuzzies your way..., SnowflakeGirl
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  5. #65
    Cy Young 2010 Mariner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnowflakeGirl
    Well, let's just say I wasn't a cheerleader. From the sound of it, I'd have been hanging out behind the school with AJane!
    I was hanging with the debate team nerds even though I wasn't on the debate team.

    I did think of one Hemingway story I actually liked, "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber."

  6. #66
    FORT Fogey Salome's Avatar
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    I was on the dance team.

  7. #67
    Resident Single Gal erin_dye's Avatar
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    I was a cheerleader.

    But I was also a member of the band, chess team and SADD so I think that counter-acted the effects.

  8. #68
    hee Mdrio9's Avatar
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    Okay, so my class is finally done with summer reading. We've just starting The Scarlett Letter. The story's pretty good thus far, but everything always has to go to people's thoughts that don't necessarily pertain to things. It's especially bad because I have to read this at night...when I'm tired, usually late. So, I have to read paragraphs over and over again because I just get lost and/or doze off. The actually events are good, but it's just aspects of the writing are making my reading experience quite lengthy.

  9. #69
    FORT Fogey Salome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mdrio9
    It's especially bad because I have to read this at night...when I'm tired, usually late. So, I have to read paragraphs over and over again because I just get lost and/or doze off. The actually events are good, but it's just aspects of the writing are making my reading experience quite lengthy.
    This happens to me all the time. It's awful!

    Luckily, my spacing out / falling asleep while reading syndrome is worst when it comes to science texts. I'm mostly spared when it comes to literature, so I just make a point of reading the science in a Starbucks on weekend mornings... with a grande Java Chip Frappuccino. I can read most other books in bed.

    The only real remedies I can think of are caffeine and uncomfortable chairs. Also, might I suggest close reading, if you don't already? By this I mean taking copious notes, even if they're otherwise useless.

    I liked the Scarlet Letter, but would like to hear what you and other people think of it. The rest of the kids in my American Lit Honors class were convinced it was the epitome of torture! Hence why I am a closet fan.

  10. #70
    Iguana Mama GreenGuysMama's Avatar
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    Hey kids,

    I'm a BA in English and my mother was an English teacher and obtained a Master's degree in the years after WWII, when most women did not pursue higher education other than their MRS., if you get my drift. My father was also a teacher.

    I was always encouraged to read and I was a precocious reader. I am so glad to read here how people are still reading the classics, though I along with others, question the value of some of the so-called classics in education these days. It seems to me that some of them could be phased out in favor of more contemporary and timely works - while still ensuring that serious students have a basis of classical education, in order to instill a love of reading in students. I love the classics, but I feel that in terms of reaching students today, some of the older books might be taught differently; as teaching much older works might alienate students from reading, thinking that books are all boring. There are many contemprary books that can still teach and inspire, rather than bore, students. Once students learn to appreciate literature, perhaps they will pursue that and read the true classics.

    Stargazer: as I minored in medieval English literature in college, Le Morte d' Artur was like a bible to me in college. Lucy, "The Once and Future King" is one of my favorite books and never far from my elbow on my nightstand. I adore it. Mariner, the L'engle books such as "A Wrinkle In Time" are standards, and should be taught. I have a boxed edition of her works and I love them. I still read them occasionally. They are magic.

    I am glad to read all your comments! A fascinating thread!

    If I may be so bold, I will add one favorite of mine, although it is not a classic, nor is it taught: "A Winter's Tale" by Mark Helprin. A far-ranging book, which involves a good bit of time, but well worth it.

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