+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 96

Thread: Lit 101

  1. #11
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Small Town USA
    Age
    55
    Posts
    4,070
    I had to reread Huckleberry Finn for a college literature class. I've always loved that book. Guess I'm one of the few. I also enjoyed Tom Sawyer; I really am a fan of Mark Twain's writing.

    It's funny but I really don't remember many of my assigned books in school. I was a rebel, so I never read any of them, just bluffed my way through. That's a shame, really. I hurt no one but myself. The really weird thing is that I read constantly, and have since my mother taught me to read.

    Lucy, Wuthering Heights was one of my favorites. I don't mind the odd sad ending; I enjoy a good cry now and then.

    Animal Farm, Brave New World and 1984 were all excellent. I still think about all three. My son bought me an animated movie version of Animal Farm for my birthday one year. I need to drag it out and watch it again.
    Well I was born in a small town
    And I can breathe in a small town
    Gonna die in this small town
    And that's prob'ly where they'll bury me

  2. #12
    The Girl With FORT-itude saltyj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Over There
    Posts
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by scarlett530
    For example: One of my all time favorites of the "had to reads" was Great Expectations. Loved it. The absolute worst was "The Red Badge of Courage." Hated it with a passion. I managed to get through the first chapter and cliff-noted my way through the rest. I loved Shakespeare, Robert Frost, and I adored E.A. Poe.

    Funny, I despised Great Expectations and LOVED Red Badge. I will always love Shakespeare.
    Viva La Vie Boheme!

  3. #13
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,517
    Quote Originally Posted by scarlett530
    For example: One of my all time favorites of the "had to reads" was Great Expectations. Loved it.

    One that I especially had a love/hate relationship with was "The Lady or the Tiger." (You can read it online, I believe.) I remember being gripped by the story, reading fast as I could to the end, to find out what happened. Then I remember literally throwing my Literature book across the room because of the ending. That was about 9th grade, I believe, and to this day, it still makes an impact on me. Anyone else have fond or horrible memories about Literature?
    Ugh- Great Expectations was the worst book ever. I had to sparknote some chapters- it was that bad. In 8th grade, we read To Kill a Mockingbird. I thought that was the WORST BOOK EVER. I hated that book with a passion.
    I had the same reaction to "Lady and the Tiger"

    Here are some books we read this year and last year
    Great Expectations
    Of Mice and Men
    Romeo and Juliet
    Cyrano de Bergerac
    The Odyssey
    The Kitchen God's Wife
    House on Mango Street
    Nectar in a Sieve
    Lord of the Flies
    Taming of the Shrew
    All Quiet on the Western Front
    Things Fall Apart
    The Bean Trees
    Slaughterhouse Five

    Short Stories
    Where are you going, Where have you been-- very interesting
    The Black Cat
    The Lottery
    Tell Tale Heart
    The Use of Force

  4. #14
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Charming
    Posts
    9,353
    I do believe that To Kill a Mockingbird was recently named as the greatest work of popular fiction of the 20th century, or some such thing. Even though the subject matter is somewhat dated, the writing is still shines brilliantly, which is why it continues to be taught in schools, Pinkie.

    I didn't love all the books I was given to read in school...almost, but not all. I had no love for Crime and Punishment, nor East of Eden (I'm just not a Steinbeck fan) but I appreciate why books like these and Shakespeare's works SHOULD be read. Classic novels are the basis for the student's future love of reading and appreciation of good literature...there are so many references to the classics in popular fiction, movies, and even current news events, it's essential that kids at least try to experience and understand the books that are pushed on them in school.

    Don't I sound like a snotty English teacher. I'll make it worse and say that I think all Cliff notes (Coles notes here in Canada) should be burned. I've never looked at one myself. Reading has never been a chore for me, although The Old Man and The Sea came damned close. If teachers are going to make kids read Hemingway, for God's sake pick something with more life to it, like The Sun Also Rises.

    Have any of the Americans here read any of our brilliant Canadian writers? Margaret Laurence, Margaret Atwood, Robertson Davies? They are all taught in schools here (although Atwood and Davies are usually considered university material).

    ETA: I'm a rabid Austen fan from way back, but I admit Colin Firth as Darcy made P & P even better. It's truly amazing how fabulous that man looks in tights and a ruffled shirt.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

  5. #15
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    918
    Oh, yes, "The Old Man and the Sea." Metaphor for life and all that blah blah blah...a very easy read but I didn't care for it much

    AJane, you sound like my 12th grade AP English teacher who would always preach to us the importance of being "well read." I think she was absolutely right and I do appreciate the literature I read, even if I didn't care for it much (I thought Moby Dick was a snoozefest, for example). I actually for a brief moment considered getting my degree as an English teacher, and I actually still toy around with the idea of getting a second degree in English.

  6. #16
    Being VIP Yardgnome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Harnessing my evil for good.
    Posts
    5,469
    I loved all the old literature that I read back in High School. I really enjoyed The Metamorphosis & The Old Man and the Sea.
    Some of the other books I really likes were Grapes of Wrath, A Room with a View, A Tale of Two Cities, The River Why, The Twelfth Night (Shakespeare), Candid, and Catcher in the Rye.
    One book I remember hating and not being able to finish was Frankenstein.

  7. #17
    Resident Single Gal erin_dye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Snoozing at my desk again.
    Age
    33
    Posts
    678
    Pinkie, I remember Lord of the Flies. My class was the first year my eighth grade english teacher didn't assign that, so I borrowed a class copy anyways and read it in my spare time. Great book! Had a wonderful time pondering if something like that could really happen.

  8. #18
    Resident Single Gal erin_dye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Snoozing at my desk again.
    Age
    33
    Posts
    678
    I have found a lot of the books mentioned here online. I'll never have to buy books again! I'm actually out of reading material and this will keep me entertained for a long time. I haven't read any good classic literature for a while.

  9. #19
    LG.
    LG. is offline
    FORT Writer LG.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    frozen tundra
    Posts
    14,060
    I loved Huck Finn but didn't like Tom Sawyer. Huck is so much more of a likeable person, and treats Jim like a PERSON.

    Pride and Prejudice is my all-time favorite book.

    Animal Farm and 1984 are must-read for political conspiracy fans, good social commentary.

    I loved O Henry's Gift of the Magi.

    Think I might read Turn of the Screw as I missed that one somehow.
    Help fight cystic fibrosis or just learn more about it at the cystic fibrosis foundation website, www.cff.org and help give my little guy a better future.

  10. #20
    RESIDENT JEDI MASTER Stargazer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    On a Rocky Mountain High
    Age
    38
    Posts
    11,928
    I was never much of a Hemingway fan, but I always enjoyed his short story, "Hills Like White Elephants". It showcases a very powerful moment between the two characters.

    "The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant was also very moving to me. Poe and Irving were always good for an interesting short story as well. James Joyce never did too much for me.

    Two that I particularly hated were "The Rocking Horse Winner" by D.H. Lawrence (who I usually loved) and "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" by Marquez. Blech.

    I thought "The Red Badge of Courage" was the worst book I had ever read and I would almost give it that distinction today if I hadn't of also read "The Catcher in the Rye" which I consider the most overrated piece of crap ever written. "The Red Badge of Courage" does hold the unique position of being the only book I ever read that got better in its final chapters. It was heinous until almost the very end, though.

    "Jane Eyre" remains one of my favorite classics of all time but "Morte D'Arthur", "The Three Musketeers" and "Don Quixote" are right up there.

    I'll probably chime in again before this thread disappears. I'm a HUGE classic lit fan.
    "Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter."- Yoda

    "I'll just see where Providence takes me and try to look like I got there confidently." - Craig Ferguson

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.