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Thread: The True Crime Genre

  1. #91
    Rude and Abrasive Texicana's Avatar
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    She'll have to get the hell out of Canada, I'm sure, Q.
    " I look like Nigella Lawson with a $#*!ing hangover."

  2. #92
    Go Bruins! Qboots's Avatar
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    Would you guys be willing to take her? Please?

    I'm hoping the cops and the press will dog her every step and never give her a moment's peace.
    "I'm telling you - it's a madhouse out there. I feel like Charlton Heston waking up in the field and seeing the chimp on top of the pony." ~ Dennis Miller

  3. #93
    Rude and Abrasive Texicana's Avatar
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    This is the book I was referring to, for those readers who are sickly fascinated with this case (as I am): Karla: A Pact With the Devil:

    The rest of the article can be found at
    http://www.januarymagazine.com/biography/karlabio.html

    "Go hunting for a copy of Stephen Williams' gruesome portrait of serial sex killer Karla Homolka and you're unlikely to have much luck. For various reasons, Karla: A Pact With the Devil has been pulled from many bookstores in English Canada, the country where the book is published and where Homolka's crimes occurred. Lawyer Tim Danson -- who represents the families of two of the girls Homolka and her husband, Paul Bernardo, killed -- requested that booksellers in Canada not stock either Karla: A Pact With the Devil or an earlier work by Williams that also deals with the Bernardo/Homolka case, Invisible Darkness. Not only did many bookstores comply, but an early March poll of visitors to the Canadian Booksellers Association Web site suggested that while 41 per cent of Canadian booksellers feel A Pact With the Devil should be displayed, 27 per cent felt it should be available, but not on display and a shocking 32 per cent -- of booksellers, don't forget -- felt the book should be banned."


    We don't want her in the States either!!
    " I look like Nigella Lawson with a $#*!ing hangover."

  4. #94
    Go Bruins! Qboots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texicana
    We don't want her in the States either!!
    Rats. Something tells me we're going to have a hard time finding any takers.
    "I'm telling you - it's a madhouse out there. I feel like Charlton Heston waking up in the field and seeing the chimp on top of the pony." ~ Dennis Miller

  5. #95
    *Until Next Season...* karalott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donnababe
    So happy to have found this thread!!! Love love love true crime! I've been reading it for years and have trouble finding something new at the book store. You guys have given me something to look for at Amazon.

    One of my all-time favs that I didn't see mentioned was, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote (sp?). You should be able to find it at the library. I think it was the first one I read that got me going in this genre. Another oldie but goodie is, The Onion Field by Joeseph Wambaugh (sp?).
    I saw a mini series about it a few years ago on CBS, I think (my mother told me too there was an earlier version of the book made as well). That book gave me chills. As I said a few pages back, it's one of my all time faves. I also notice when I go to the bookstore I have problems finding true crime. One store I went to used to have a whole section devoted to it, and now it's just lumped in with everything else. And they really don't have many good selections anymore. Glad I was able to get the books I did.
    Last edited by karalott; 03-22-2005 at 11:15 PM.

  6. #96
    Miz Smarty Britches queenb's Avatar
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    I finally got ahold of a book I've been trying to find for a couple of years-- An Evil Love by Geoffery Wansell. Some of you may remember the show on TV about the house at 25 Cromwell St. in Gloucseter England, where a couple named Frederick and Rosemary West lived. This is the only book based on actual interviews with Fred, and so including lots of details about what went on there. (Fred committed suicide in prison, while Rosemary is still in prison and denies knowing anything about the crimes.) This book was deeply disturbing to me; this couple make Karla Holmolka and Paul Bernardo look mentally healthy...shudder! This book is well written, and I can't figure out why it was never published in the US.
    I have found the Truth and it doesn't make sense.

  7. #97
    Just Forting Around roseskid's Avatar
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    How did it take me so long to find this thread? I'm a huge true crime fiend, and also take decoy books...I had no idea others did that, too. I feel like I've been reunited with old family members.

    I've read A Child Called It, In Cold Blood, Helter Skelter, all those. Loved them. Can't think of any others right now, because it's so late, but I'll be baaaaaaccckk.
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  8. #98
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    If I may make a couple of recommendations:

    The Story of Jane Doe (by Jane Doe herself).
    For those who don't know the story Jane Doe is a woman who was raped by a serial rapist. The police knew that a serial rapist was active in the area and was targeting women who were very much like her. The police did not warn women in the area because they did not want the rapist to slip away. They were in effect using women as bait to catch him. The police finally did catch him. Jane Doe refused to accept the way the police handled rape cases and took the Toronto Police to court. The lawsuit ground on for 11 years and even her friends said that she should move on with her life. Eventually she won an apology and a financial settlement. The book is about how her rape was handled, how it changed her and how she kept fighting even though no-one thought that she had a chance of winning. Sadly, it's also about her feelings that nothing has changed about how the police and the courts handle rape cases. Still, it's not a completely depressing book. Through it all, Jane Doe's personality and humour are there. The CBC made a movie about the case, and it was a fairly good movie, but it didn't really capture Jane Doe's personality.

    The second book I would like to recommend is:

    No Claim to Mercy by Derek Finkle
    Robert Baltovich was convicted of murdering his girlfriend Elizabeth Bain. He has appealed his conviction and was eventually granted a new trial (which has yet to take place). The book is about the investigation of that case. Almost right from the start the police decided that Robert Baltovich was guilty (it seems to me that it was an easy way out for them). Certain of his actions were twisted to make him appear guilty (such as not helping in the search for her body - his lawyer told him not to, because it would look really bad if he turned out to be the one who found the body). Certain things that he said were isolated to appear almost as a confession (Baltovich would not follow his lawyers advice when he said to stop talking to the police). Witnesses were encouraged to slightly amend their statements if they did not fit into the police theory of the crime. Robert Baltovich may in fact be Elizabeth Bain's killer, but there seems to be very little evidence that he was. It's scary to see how police and prosecutors build a case to fit a pre-conceived theory.

    If you like your true crime books bloody, these are not books for you. But, if like me, you are interested in the way that crimes are investigated or in the people affected I think that you will like these books.

  9. #99
    Shoveling the ocean MissThing's Avatar
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    I know this was menntioned above, but a true classic is Blood and Money by Tommy Thompson. It's right up there with In Cold Blood.
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  10. #100
    Teraisa1
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    Disapproval

    Quote Originally Posted by Frostelized
    I would love to get a couple of True Crime books, but my family would dissaprove. I used to flip through them before, but stopped because of embarrassment at the thought of what people would think, girl who looks 13 looking at photos of crime scenes.
    Sometimes I feel like a freak for "enjoying" true crime, is that what your family's problems are? The truth is, though, the people against it, seem to enjoy fictional crime--at least we are learning about REAL life. I wish you best in being comfortable in reading what interests you. I just thank God you read at all!

    Take care,

    Teraisa
    Teraisa J. Rogers
    True Crime Fanatic: Helping Victims ALL THE TIME
    http://TrueCrimeFanatic.com
    TCF: Where readers and writers come together.

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