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Thread: The Da Vinci Code

  1. #71
    caught by the window MasterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    yeah, agreed... without the epilogue it would have sucked bigtime

  2. #72
    Jonesing for Ben pink_princess's Avatar
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    I decided to be a joiner and picked this up today. It sounds like just the thing to curl up with the next time we get a snowstorm, but I'm going to try to avoid the whole staying up until 5 in the morning thing to finish it.

    It was 30% off at Borders, I didn't even check Barnes & Noble because that would have meant another trip to the mall, but the 30% was a nice discount. With paperbacks costing $8 or even more, hardcovers really aren't too painful to buy.

  3. #73
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
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    Okay, so I'm reading A & D now, and I have to complain. One thing about both of these books that just rings so false for me is that the plot devices are just so damned unlikely. He evidently likes to condense the time frame down into this really short period, so it requires these repeated leaps of brilliance. Everything is "Suddenly it became clear!" and "All of a sudden, he just *knew* what the next marker would be!" Bull. These characters can be geniuses all day long, but there's no way they'd have one epiphany after another. No freaking way.

    It makes for a suspenseful read, but I really feel like the author relies on that device far too often.

  4. #74
    FORT Fogey
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    Amanda I totally agree..

  5. #75
    Hypermediocrity Amanda's Avatar
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    It seems as if the 15 minutes for this book has passed, but I'm still thinking about going to the following lecture. Watching a bunch of people be psychobabble-laden literary snobs is always a good time.

    The Da Vinci Code: A Jungian Perspective

    Jung used the term "numinousity" to describe the evocative/seductive intensity of symbols. A symbolic encounter is a wake-up call to the limbic system of the brain. We are involuntarily transported to states of rapture/agony/wonder. The symbols contained in this book's re-telling of the Grail quest myth for the post-modern person tend to electrify and transform the reader.

    The novel raises many questions: What is the role of institutional religion as mediators or protectors of the symbol's power? What is the difference between the God of theologians and God-images of individual believers? What about the appreciation and/or repression of the role of the feminine in religious symbolism? What is the role of culture as mediator/predator of the sacred?

    The Da Vinci Code has been described as an exhilarating blend of relentless adventure, scholarly intrigue, and cutting wit. Please bring your taste for adventure, intrigue, wit, your longing for clues to your belonging, and your many questions to this workshop.

    Required reading: The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown
    Suggested reading: The Gnostic Gospels, Elaine Pagels

  6. #76
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
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    I got this book for Christmas and enjoyed it while I was reading it, but it felt like he started with this particular idea and strained to get a plot around it. I frankly had trouble buying that the
    Click to see Spoiler:
    her grandfather could go get a special pen from his office, make up riddles and write on paintings in another room, then more riddles on the floor plus a drawing, then draw on himself in blood, then arrange himself, then die.
    Oddly, the shocking theory about the Grail is not hard to believe, but all the jumps in understanding are.

    All in all it seemed like a more readable/approachable Umberto Eco novel. "Foucault's Pendulum" by Eco really had some great blow your mind moments, but it's a daunting book.

    Sounds like a fun lecture, Amanda. Maybe the lecturer will hold up a symbol that can transport you "to states of rapture/agony/wonder". Let me know what that looks like.
    You've gotta hustle if you want to earn a dollar. - Boston Rob

  7. #77
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    but it felt like he started with this particular idea and strained to get a plot around it.
    Exactly how I felt reading it. I believe I posted something extremely similar here.

    Angels & Demons was better plot-wise.

  8. #78
    Why Not Us? greenie's Avatar
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    I'm with you all on the stretches in the plot line. I still enjoyed the book though.

    Let us know what happens in the lecture, Amanda. Sounds interesting. More interesting than the book even.
    Who shot who in the what now?

  9. #79
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
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    Okay, John, I picked up a copy of Angels & Demons today on your recommendation.
    You've gotta hustle if you want to earn a dollar. - Boston Rob

  10. #80
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
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    Alright, since I posted here last I read "Angels & Demons", which made me run out and guy "Deception Point" and "Digital Fortress."

    Now I'm ready to say argh. A&D was definitely a great read, and I thought the plot flowed better than The Da Vinci Code. But Deception Point & Digital Fortress went way down in quality, especially DF (I think this was his first book.) I liked the overall ideas of these two books - one involves a discovery in the Arctic and what it means to humanity, the other is all about computers & cryptology - but the puzzles in it shouldn't be so transparent that someone like me can solve them before the characters in the book. I'll turn the spoilers on about now.
    Click to see Spoiler:
    He spends a lot of time in DF working to convince you that the main character is the most amazing cryptographer in the world and makes tons of money working in her super secret job. Well, I'm not an amazingly brilliant, rich and beautiful cryptographer and yet the final puzzle in DF was so transparent I assumed it couldn't be that easy. I even looked up from my book and asked my husband, if someone asked you the "prime difference in elements between Hiroshima and Nagasaki" what would be your first thought? And like me he assumed it meant there was a difference in the chemical formulas between those two bombs. But no, they have to argue about sociopolitical factors that led to the bombing of those cities, even though they already knew it was a numerical answer. Sheesh! :rolleyes


    Okay, I'm done ranting. I would recommend A&D unreservedly, Deception Point with reservations, and definitely don't read more than one Dan Brown novel in a row.

    ETA: Kind of interesting that smilies still show when you use the spoiler function!
    You've gotta hustle if you want to earn a dollar. - Boston Rob

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