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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #6071
    FORT Newbie amanda007's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    I am currently reading Stephen Kings 11.22.63
    Stephenie Meyers breaking dawn
    wuthering heights
    Grimm tales
    whilst typing my hand written manuscript on to my computer, obviously they aren't all in front of me because i change from one to the other depending on my mood and how big the book is if i am traveling anywhere, i cant carry a huge book in my little handbag.

  2. #6072
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    I just got a copy of Andre Agassi's autobiography, Open, from the bargain bin at my favorite used bookstore. It's all I can do to not throw over both books I'm reading so I can read this one first! I've always liked Andre and this book got really good reviews. I've also heard that it's uncommonly well written for a sports autobiography, which may or may not be a compliment. That could be sort of like "Wow, I expected you to be an illiterate clod, but that wasn't so bad." I guess I'll find out!

    One of the things I love about the bookstore where I bought this one is that whenever you buy anything, you get to "spin the wheel," which is exactly what it sounds like. The prizes - there are about a dozen of them - include a $10 gift certificate, any paperback in the store for $1 or $2 for any hardcover fiction, which is what I got tonight. I ended up with The Story of Edgar Sawtelle. I've heard mixed reviews, but for $2, I thought I'd give it a try. I'll just add it to the ever-growing pile of books I need to read!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  3. #6073
    Live-Love-Laugh Fanny Mare's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    The Story of Edgar Sawtelle


    I loved this book.

  4. #6074
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical View Post
    I just got a copy of Andre Agassi's autobiography, Open, from the bargain bin at my favorite used bookstore. It's all I can do to not throw over both books I'm reading so I can read this one first! I've always liked Andre and this book got really good reviews. I've also heard that it's uncommonly well written for a sports autobiography, which may or may not be a compliment. That could be sort of like "Wow, I expected you to be an illiterate clod, but that wasn't so bad." I guess I'll find out!
    Well, it didn't take me long to break down and start reading this - maybe 30 minutes! I'm happy to report that this is a fantastically well-written book PERIOD. Not for an athlete or a celebrity. It's well-written, full stop. I've always been an Agassi fan, but this makes me admire him even more. It's not at all a fluffy sports autobiography. It's so insightful and emotional and revealing. Color me impressed. I'm only 65 pages in, but this one is a big thumbs up
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  5. #6075
    FORT Fogey Lizard's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Received Dr. Laura Schlessinger's book The Proper Care and Feeding of Husbands. It is much better than her show which I have only a handful of times. It aims directly at women and uses wording or communication we can understand.
    I see why it gets five stars. It's reviews are spot on.
    You can do it!

  6. #6076
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    I ended up staying all night on Tuesday to finish Open. It's one of the best autobiographies I've read and certainly the best one I've read in a while. Agassi was open and honest without being indiscreet. He revealed a lot about himself and his life, but he didn't "kiss and tell" as far as his relationships go. I was just really impressed with how introspective and thoughtful he was. So many autobiographies fall into a basic chronology and I thought he was really good at looking at how things affected him and going deeper.

    I'm about to finish John McPhee's The Ransom of Russian Art about an American economics professor who built the largest collection of Soviet underground art in the world. Lots of KGB intrigue and art talk. Really fascinating. The only problem is that the pages of my book are bound upside down. It's like the pages were sitting there waiting to be bound and they put the cover on the outside edges instead of the inside edges. SO, I had to read the book back to front, i.e. page 1 was at the back when the pages were right side up and I had to read from the back of the book to the front, turning the pages the exact opposite way from every other book I've ever read. ARGH! It was so hard to adapt and I really never did. I was supposed to get a replacement copy but it hasn't arrived from the publisher yet. Still, very interesting.

    Next, I go back to Catherine the Great!
    cablejockey likes this.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  7. #6077
    Me and my shadow Gutmutter's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    The librarian recommended First Grave on the Right by Darynda Jones. It's sort of Stephanie Plum with a paranormal twist. I listened to it on audio book, enjoyed it, so I listened to the next one, Second Grave on the Left. By then I was really sucked in and asked if there was another. It was about to come out so I pre-ordered it on my Kindle. It arrived Jan. 31 and I tried to read it slowly to make it last longer, but I finished it last night. I highly recommend it if you like Stephanie Plum. Same sort of irreverant, plucky gal but with an added dimension. The new (third) one is Third Grave Dead Ahead. There will be more, but not soon enough!!!
    Count your blessings!

  8. #6078
    Live-Love-Laugh Fanny Mare's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    I have just started Into the Darkest Corner by Elizabeth Haynes. This is a very disturbing book This is a UK novel, for an online UK Book Club that I'm involved in. The writing is extremely compelling, and although I was reluctant at first, I can barely put it down now.

    I finally finshed 'The Adults' as well. I had set it aside and then within three days gobbled it up

  9. #6079
    50 years and counting! AZChristian's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Hey Gutmutter . . .

    I just finished the whole "Dragon Tattoo" trilogy. Thanks for encouraging me to not quit after the first book. Too bad there won't be another book . . . I'd love to find out what happened to Camilla Salander.

  10. #6080
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical View Post
    I ended up staying all night on Tuesday to finish Open. It's one of the best autobiographies I've read and certainly the best one I've read in a while. Agassi was open and honest without being indiscreet. He revealed a lot about himself and his life, but he didn't "kiss and tell" as far as his relationships go. I was just really impressed with how introspective and thoughtful he was. So many autobiographies fall into a basic chronology and I thought he was really good at looking at how things affected him and going deeper.

    I'm about to finish John McPhee's The Ransom of Russian Art about an American economics professor who built the largest collection of Soviet underground art in the world. Lots of KGB intrigue and art talk. Really fascinating. The only problem is that the pages of my book are bound upside down. It's like the pages were sitting there waiting to be bound and they put the cover on the outside edges instead of the inside edges. SO, I had to read the book back to front, i.e. page 1 was at the back when the pages were right side up and I had to read from the back of the book to the front, turning the pages the exact opposite way from every other book I've ever read. ARGH! It was so hard to adapt and I really never did. I was supposed to get a replacement copy but it hasn't arrived from the publisher yet. Still, very interesting.

    Next, I go back to Catherine the Great!

    When I was in college, a friend of mine bought the obligatory Riverside Shakespeare for Shakespeare class and realized after he got home that it was bound upside down. He rather enjoyed the looks he got when he was reading it in the library or elsewhere on campus. People didn't seem to know whether he was illiterate and didn't realize it was upside down or was so brilliant that he read Shakespeare upside down.

    I just finished Erica Bauermeister's The School of Essential Ingredients--a quick, pleasant read but since all of the characters are either teaching a cooking class or taking it, it does tend to make you hungry and not really for things you're just going to find in your fridge at midnight (or feel like whipping up at that time of night, even if the ingredients are in the fridge), and when the characters are eating handmade pasta with fresh made sauce, that bag of Cheetos in the cupboard just isn't going to cut it.

    The School of Essential Ingredients was her first novel. A second--Joy for Beginners--is available in hardback or e-book form. I just ordered it for my Nook about five minutes ago. Apparently it's about a group of women friends who meet to celebrate one of them beating cancer and they challenge her to go white water rafting. Then they decide that over the course of the next year, each of them should do something that frightens them, but the kicker is that the group gets to decide the challenge, not the individual. I'm hoping it will be like The School of Essential Ingredients in tone--that is, unfortunate things may happen to characters but there's still a sense of possibilities and hope for them. Maybe that sounds Pollyanna-ish, but I don't want to read dark and depressing stuff in February. Or during the winter in general, even if it's been a very mild winter thus far.

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