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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #421
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    I finally got around to "The Lovely Bones" by Alice Sebold. Riveting -- I was sucked in and couldn't put it down. But also I was in tears before page 50.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  2. #422
    FORT Fan hollywoodbarbie's Avatar
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    hey Lucy
    My daughter just got that book from my Mom and hasn't started it yet...for some reason she didn't inherit the reading bug from my side of the family...Let me know if it is any good please and I can try and encourage her to start reading it. Thanks Barb

  3. #423
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    Oh, it was great, I highly recommend it. It was just very sad at first. But I really liked it. If your daughter won't read it, borrow it from her and read it yourself.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  4. #424
    From the corner of my eye Jewelsy's Avatar
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    Just started "Twilight Eyes" by Dean Koontz.

  5. #425
    FORT Regular sleuth's Avatar
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    The Lovely Bones is an excellent book. Quite sad but really good.

    I just started Saving Faith by David Baldacci.

  6. #426
    Why Not Us? greenie's Avatar
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    I just finished reading "Middlesex" by Jeffrey Eugenides. Fantastic book! I loved the whole thing. Here's a description about the book, but it's so much more than just that:

    "I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974."

    So begins Jeffrey Eugenides' second novel, Middlesex, the story of Calliope Stephanides, who discovers at the age of fourteen that she is really a he. Cal traces the story of his transformation and the genetic condition that caused it back to his paternal grandparents, who happen also to be brother and sister, and the Greek village of Bithynios in Asia Minor.

    In 1922, Desdemona Stephanides and her brother, Lefty, whose parents were killed in the recent war with the Turks, are living alone in their nearly abandoned village. Pulled together by isolation, sympathy, and, perhaps, fate, Lefty and Desdemona become husband and wife, and a recessive genetic condition begins its journey toward eventual expression in their grandchild Calliope.

    Middlesex is a story about what it means to occupy the complex and unnamed middle ground between male and female, Greek and American, past and present. For Cal, caught between these identities, the journey to adulthood is particularly fraught. Jeffrey Eugenides' epic portrayal of Cal's struggle is classical in its structure and scope and contemporary in its content; a tender and honest examination of a battle that is increasingly relevant to us all.
    Who shot who in the what now?

  7. #427
    FORT Fogey
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    I am re-reading "Watership Down". Its long but well worth it.

  8. #428
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    I just finished "The Tattooed Girl" by Joyce Carol Oates. I was disappointed by We Were The Mulvaneys, and this one was a pleasant surprise Very original, but the ending was dissatisfying.

    I also finished Coraline - Snowflake Girl, did you read that yet? I loved it, in fact I couldn't put it down (it is a quick read, mind you). It's a great book for anyone pre-teen and up.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
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  9. #429
    FORT Fogey
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    Quote Originally Posted by averagejane
    I just finished "The Tattooed Girl".
    Now there is some irony AJ considering your recent time spent beneath the ink gun.
    Last edited by Daddio; 05-13-2004 at 11:56 AM.

  10. #430
    Rude and Abrasive Texicana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenie
    I just finished reading "Middlesex" by Jeffrey Eugenides. Fantastic book! I loved the whole thing. Here's a description about the book, but it's so much more than just that:

    "I was born twice: first, as a baby girl, on a remarkably smogless Detroit day in January of 1960; and then again, as a teenage boy, in an emergency room near Petoskey, Michigan, in August of 1974."

    So begins Jeffrey Eugenides' second novel, Middlesex, the story of Calliope Stephanides, who discovers at the age of fourteen that she is really a he. Cal traces the story of his transformation and the genetic condition that caused it back to his paternal grandparents, who happen also to be brother and sister, and the Greek village of Bithynios in Asia Minor.

    In 1922, Desdemona Stephanides and her brother, Lefty, whose parents were killed in the recent war with the Turks, are living alone in their nearly abandoned village. Pulled together by isolation, sympathy, and, perhaps, fate, Lefty and Desdemona become husband and wife, and a recessive genetic condition begins its journey toward eventual expression in their grandchild Calliope.

    Middlesex is a story about what it means to occupy the complex and unnamed middle ground between male and female, Greek and American, past and present. For Cal, caught between these identities, the journey to adulthood is particularly fraught. Jeffrey Eugenides' epic portrayal of Cal's struggle is classical in its structure and scope and contemporary in its content; a tender and honest examination of a battle that is increasingly relevant to us all.
    Greenie, thanks for the book recommendation! I might have to get the husband to buy it for me so I can read it during my Texas vacation
    " I look like Nigella Lawson with a $#*!ing hangover."

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