+ Reply to Thread
Like Tree256Likes

Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #3911
    FORT Fogey famita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,756

    Re: What are you reading?

    I just started reading a mystery by Marcie Muller-Burn Out. It captured me from the first.

  2. #3912
    FORT Fogey
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    8,164

    Re: What are you reading?

    I finished reading Clarence Thomas' memior, "My Grandfather's Son" this week. I can honestly say that it is one of the best memiors I've ever read. For a man who is so quiet, and so guarded in his public life, he was VERY candid in this book, and it gave me an appreciation for him on so many levels. Obviously, it gives you an understanding of how he rose to being a Supreme Court justice, including giving his side of the drama of his confirmation hearing. That's interesting, but there is SO much more to the book which I did not expect -- his account of growing up black in the south under Jim Crow laws, and the evolution of his ideological thought process left a big impression on me. But undoubtedly, the highest impact and most surprising aspect of the book was the way that his grandparents raised him and his brother, and the way that it formed the man that he is today. Regardless of what you think of Thomas philosophically, to read the account of everything that his grandparents did for him and his brother is truly a lesson in how to raise boys to be men someday.

    Next up for me is A Thousand Splendid Suns, which I've been looking forward to since finishing The Kite Runner. I have not been able to start it yet, but will have some time next week when I'll be able to get a lot of reading done, and I'm hoping to really get into it fast.

  3. #3913
    FORT Devotee Mike'sgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    IA
    Posts
    5,152

    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by AJane;3282979;
    Just finishing up Jodi Picoult's Nineteen Minutes. Emotionally wrenching, but nowhere near as tough to read as We Need To Talk About Kevin - that one haunted me for weeks. I have a couple more Picoults to read and then I think I need to look for something much lighter in tone & topic.
    I hear ya! I followed that with some frivolous books - Janet Evanovich early books like Manhunt and Back to the Bedroom after reading that one. But, that is my favorite of the Jodi Picoult books and I've read most of them. I also enjoyed Plain Truth by Picoult.

    Just finished some early Charlaine Harris books in the Shakespeare series (Lily Bard); Shakespeare's Champion and Shakespeare's Trollop. I have the final one in the series Shakespeare's Counselor arriving any day now.

    Critical How was your meeting/interview with half of the Hailey Lind team? Loved her books, and actually think I may have learned some art history as well.
    So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.
    Christopher Reeve

  4. #3914
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    45
    Posts
    16,399

    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike'sgirl;3287594;
    Critical How was your meeting/interview with half of the Hailey Lind team? Loved her books, and actually think I may have learned some art history as well.
    Thanks for reminding me! I totally spaced on that. Julie was so fantastic! She was just what I imagined she would be. After spending a few hours with her, I totally wanted to be her best friend. She talked about the books, but mainly the first one and about where the characters came from. Annie is basically her, or at least her hair (lots of it and very curly) and her business, which has the same name as Annie's. She also lives in Oakland. Several characters are based on real life people, but she changed the names. Sadly, there are no real-life Michaels or Franks

    She has a deal to write (on her own) two other series of books. One is a witchcraft mystery series and the other is more of a straight mystery series. At least the witchcraft series will be written under the pseudonym of Juliet Blackwell. Here's a link to the listing on Amazon (even though it won't be released until July): Amazon.com: Secondhand Spirits: A Witchcraft Mystery: Juliet Blackwell: Books

    I asked her why Signet let Feint of Art go out of print and here was their explanation: the book was selling so well and when it sold out, they just decided not to print any more! Seriously. What morons. Anyway, her next series will also be published by Signet, so if it does well, they WILL publish the next book in the Annie Kincaid series. If not, she has another publisher - a small mystery publisher - that will release the book. Either way, it looks like we'll be hearing more from Annie!

    From what I gather, she does the bulk of the writing and her sister is the re-writer/fact checker. She kept talking about it being a collaborative process, but then she said other things that made it sound like she did more of the actual writing. I'm excited to read her new series when it comes out and see if it differs from the books she writes with her sister.

    Change of subject: I am LOVING The Monsters of Templeton! It's so quirky and unique. I can't wait to see how it ends, but I know I'll be a little sad when it's over. The mark of a good book!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  5. #3915
    I won't forget Cootie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    In the garden
    Posts
    2,473

    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by famita;3287229;
    I just started reading a mystery by Marcia Muller-Burn Out. It captured me from the first.
    I have been reading mostly children's books for the last 20 years but still love a good mystery and Marcia Muller is a favorite author of mine. I am headed to the library right now and may look for this one or at least put it on hold. Marcia is married to another mystery author, Bill Pronzini, who wrote the Nameless Dectective series. I just found an interview with them that is fairly recent if you want to know more about them.

    I am currently reading YA fantasy and science fiction novels in order to be able to recommend them to kids for a reading program. I am looking at books that are not made into movies or so popular that we don't need to "sell" them. Any suggestions? Right now I have Elsewhere by Gabrielle Zevin, Epic by Conor Kostick, The Alchemist by Michael Scott and Dragon's Keep by Janet Lee Carey. I read the first few chapters of each one last night as I was trying to decide which one to dive into first. I still can't decide as I am liking all of them. And of course I don't have much time. Any cautions or support for these titles? I usually read books for younger students so I am a bit out of my realm.

  6. #3916
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Charming
    Posts
    9,353

    Re: What are you reading?




    John Updike, Superlative American Man of Letters, Dies at 76

    One of America's best known writers, John Updike, died of cancer on Tuesday at the age of 76. His stories, poems, essays and novels have been widely read and admired around the world.

    John Updike published more than 25 novels, a dozen short story collections, and a large body of literary and artistic criticism.

    In a literary career that spanned more than half a century, Updike won many American prizes for literature, including two Pulitzers, the National Book Award and three National Book Critics' Circle awards. His first published work, a collection of poems called The Carpentered Hen, appeared in 1958.

    Ultimately, Updike published more than 25 novels and a dozen short story collections. Most of his stories first appeared in the New Yorker Magazine, which carried his byline 862 times.

    Observer of small-town life

    But Robert B. Silvers, his longtime editor at the New York Review of Books, says he will be best remembered for his series of novels about the life of Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, a fictional middle-class car dealer in a small Pennsylvania town similar to the one he himself grew up in.

    "Rabbit was brought up in a bit of a fog of American life, and every 10 years we returned to him and saw America changing - from the conventional 1950s to the hippie '60s, to the business-minded '70s and '80s," Silvers says. "If you look at his series in one way, you can interpret as a one Great American novel. There's probably no other novelist who had that range of observation."

    Indeed, Updike once said that his true subject was the "Protestant, small-town middle class." But that did not mean his stories lacked drama.

    "I like middles," he once told an interviewer. "It's in middles that extremes clash, where ambiguity restlessly rules."

    Updike wrote many novels in many different forms and settings, but a personal favorite was The Centaur, a contemporary father-son conflict set within the context of Greek mythology

    Prolific writer of sometimes-controversial works

    But Updike wrote many other novels in many different forms and settings. Coup took place in colonial Africa; his Beck series concerned a Jewish writer in Eastern Europe, and The Witches of Eastwick and The Widows of Eastwick focused on a group of women living in a small New England town. These were just a taste of "the remarkable range of different kinds of [Updike's] richly imagined worlds," adds Silvers.

    Feminist critics often complained that Updike's portrayal of women was negative, and that he concentrated too much on strong male figures. Updike himself denied this. He once said, "I've always imagined that I was on fairly good terms with the opposite sex and a great appreciator of it and its many virtues."

    Of his many well-received novels, one of Updike's own favorites was The Centaur, a contemporary father-son conflict set within the framework of Greek mythology. It won the National Book Award in 1963.

    "It was quite a loving book," he recalled. "I'm not sure all my books could be called loving, but certainly it is in a way a skewered tribute to my father and his peculiar male American anguish."

    Updike said he was also "amused by the trickiness of the book, the way the myths work in and out. It … wasn't easy to write… but when it was done, it looked good. So it sits in my mind very happily."

    Critic of first rank

    Several of Updike's stories and books were adapted for television and motion pictures, and his many poems also earned him plaudits and many admirers. But according to Silvers, Updike also should be remembered as a critic of the first rank, who wrote more than 70 pieces of literary and artistic criticism for the New York Review of Books alone.

    "[His] extraordinary expository clarity of analysis, and clarity of expression, would not only describe but would always have a rather elegant critical edge which was never, ever too blunt, or derogatory in any vulgar sense," says Silvers. "That was a balance he struck between brilliant description and the intimation of a critical position."

    Updike lived in a small Massachusetts town, cherishing his privacy, his family and his golf game, in spite of his fame. In an archival interview, he was careful not to overrate his success or appear arrogant.

    "I have very few complaints," he said. "I've been allowed to 'sing my song,' as it were, and I've tried to sing it in an orderly way and have worked hard at it."

    After a thoughtful pause he added, "Whatever failings my work as a whole shows, I think, are limitations within me. And I just couldn't do better than I've done."

    VOA News - John Updike, Superlative American Man of Letters, Dies at 76

    I've often heard complaints about Updike's work being sexist, but I never agreed. I've found his writing to be witty & clever and enormously entertaining. RIP.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

  7. #3917
    FORT Fogey cablejockey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    ontario canada
    Posts
    1,767

    Re: What are you reading?

    I am in the middle of reading American Prince by Tony Curtis and Pieces of My Heart by Robert Wagner. A fascinating look into the lives of two actors that came up thru the Hollywood ranks in the early 50s. They were both considered the hunks of their time, and attracted loads of women--famous and otherwise--and married or otherwise involved with some of the most famous women of their time. Althoughthey were often compared, each man was very different in their backgrounds and early lives.
    A must read for those interested in this time period and the hollywood studio system.

  8. #3918
    FORT Fogey norealityhere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    8,145

    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by cablejockey;3292380;
    I am in the middle of reading American Prince by Tony Curtis and Pieces of My Heart by Robert Wagner. A fascinating look into the lives of two actors that came up thru the Hollywood ranks in the early 50s. They were both considered the hunks of their time, and attracted loads of women--famous and otherwise--and married or otherwise involved with some of the most famous women of their time. Althoughthey were often compared, each man was very different in their backgrounds and early lives.
    A must read for those interested in this time period and the hollywood studio system.
    I might have to read the Tony Curtis one. My parents and uncle were friends with him when they were all growing up. I saw him about a year ago at a Memorabilia show. He was still suffering from the effects of a stroke and perhaps dementia / alzheimer's. Very sad....

  9. #3919
    FORT Fogey norealityhere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    8,145

    Re: What are you reading?

    My reserved copy of Bones by Jonathan Kellerman has just arrived at the library. Has anyone yet read it?

  10. #3920
    MRD
    MRD is offline
    FORT Fogey MRD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    somewhere resting
    Age
    52
    Posts
    16,893

    Re: What are you reading?

    No, but I would like too. I like both Kellerman's works.
    Que me amat, amet et canem meum
    (Who loves me will love my dog also)

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.