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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #3191
    elk
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by brunette trixie;2781042;
    Elk, I found this on Amazon.com

    Duma Key: Where It All Began
    A Note from Chuck Verrill, the Longtime Editor of Stephen King

    Click to see Spoiler:
    In the spring of 2006 Stephen King told me he was working on a Florida story that was beginning to grow on him. "I'm thinking of calling it Duma Key," he offered. I liked the sound of that--the title was like a drumbeat of dread. "You know how Lisey's Story is a story about marriage?" he said. "Sure," I answered. The novel hadn't yet been published, but I knew its story well: Lisey and Scott Landon--what a marriage that was. Then he dropped the other shoe: "I think Duma Key might be my story of divorce."

    Pretty soon I received a slim package from a familiar address in Maine. Inside was a short story titled "Memory"--a story of divorce, all right, but set in Minnesota. By the end of the summer, when Tin House published "Memory," Stephen had completed a draft of Duma Key, and it became clear to me how "Memory" and its narrator, Edgar Freemantle, had moved from Minnesota to Florida, and how a story of divorce had turned into something more complex, more strange, and much more terrifying.

    If you read the following two texts side by side--"Memory" as it was published by Tin House and the opening chapter of Duma Key in final form--you'll see a writer at work, and how stories can both contract and expand. Whether Duma Key is an expansion of "Memory" or "Memory" a contraction of Duma Key, I can't really say. Can you?

    --Chuck Verrill
    Thanks so much, Brunette Trixie. I must have read
    Click to see Spoiler:
    Memory
    somewhere, although I don't recall where.

    Thanks for solving my mystery!
    "I'll meet you at the place near the thing that we went to that time." - Albert Brooks to Holly Hunter in Broadcast News

  2. #3192
    Mixing Old Fashioneds PhoneGrrrl's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical;2782869;
    I finished Between the Bridge and the River tonight and loved it! It was funny and odd and full of phrases that I kept wanting to write down. I can't wait to see what he'll do next.
    Oh, I loved that book! I made three people read it and they were all "meh" about it...so I no longer trust their judgment. And that damn Craig Ferguson is one of the reasons I don't get enough sleep--1 a.m. is too late for me to be watching t.v., but I can't help staying up.

  3. #3193
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by PhoneGrrrl;2784090;
    Oh, I loved that book! I made three people read it and they were all "meh" about it...so I no longer trust their judgment. And that damn Craig Ferguson is one of the reasons I don't get enough sleep--1 a.m. is too late for me to be watching t.v., but I can't help staying up.
    Don't you hate it when that happens? I don't like to recommend books very often for that reason. I feel like, not only did someone spend their money on my recommendation, but they spent their time as well. If they hate it, then it's like it's my fault!

    Craig Ferguson is the only late night talk show I'll watch. He's so quick and witty. He could have anyone on the show and I'd watch it just for him. One of these days, when I'm in SoCal visiting my family, I'm going to get tickets to a taping of his show.

    I don't know if he has plans to write another book, but I hope he does. His description of what might have happened if Archduke Ferdinand hadn't been assassinated was not only amusing, but probably dead on. Plus, the image of a large, blind, Scottish man traveling the country in an orange dress had me in stitches for days!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  4. #3194
    FORT Devotee Mike'sgirl's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Just finished Plain Truth by Jodi Picoult - which I felt was her best so far and had me hooked from the onset!

    Her more recent books tend to introduce many blurred characters in the first 30 pages, and it is hard for me to distinguish all the new characters or tell them apart so soon; but this one did not confuse me with that style of writing. "Plain Truth" was one of Picoult's earlier written books concerned with an unmarried Amish teenager who gives birth to a baby she is later accused of smothering, (neonaticide) and the high powered attorney (Ellie Hathaway) who defends her. I loved this book!

    I enjoy the moral issues that Picoult's books challenge us with, and the fact that she does not tightly wrap up her endings, but leaves something up to the readers imagination.

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    Re: What are you reading?

    After so many rave reviews, I finally read Water for Elephants and LOVED IT! I started it around 10 p.m. on Saturday and stayed up 'til 3 a.m. to finish it. I loved everything about it, including the fact that I read nearly the entire book thinking
    Click to see Spoiler:
    Marlena killed August, when it was really Rosie
    . I love having those "aha!" moments in a book. Has anyone read anything else by Sara Gruen (sp)? I wonder if this book is just a fluke or if she's really that talented.

    This weekend was definitely a book weekend. I finished Washington Square (), read Water for Elephants and then read Stewart O'Nan's The Good Wife. I wasn't even sure I wanted to read that last one, but my mother (who loaned it to me) urged me to give it a chance. Well, I can't say it's my favorite book of the year, but I also couldn't put it down. It's the story of a woman who waits for her husband after he is incarcerated for over 20 years for a crime he may not have committed. All of this is pretty much on the back cover synopsis of the book, so I'm not giving it all away! The writing wasn't over-the-top great in that "I need to read that passage again" way, but the story was really absorbing. O'Nan makes a point of detailing all the things going on in the real world while the husband is in prison - from the Iran hostage crisis to 911. It really brings home how very long 25 years is. Anyway, not a bad way to spend a Sunday

    I've now started Helen Hooven Santmyer's "... And Ladies of the Club", which is over 1400 pages and has been sitting on my bookshelf for about 3 years, since my mother loaned it to me. The people I know who have read it say it's wonderful, but I don't know many people who have read it since it's so huge. Anyone tried this one? I'm only about 50 pages in and am enjoying it so far. It's set in a college town in Ohio just after the Civil War and follows (from what I've read about the book) a ladies literary club and its members through the 1930s.

    When I moved recently, I set aside all the book my mother has loaned me so that they wouldn't get mixed in with my books. When the pile grew to over 20 books, I figured I'd better start reading some of them. Not sure what's next, but then, this book I'm reading right now is so huge, I might not have to make that decision for a while!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  6. #3196
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical;2791434;
    I've now started Helen Hooven Santmyer's "... And Ladies of the Club", which is over 1400 pages and has been sitting on my bookshelf for about 3 years, since my mother loaned it to me. The people I know who have read it say it's wonderful, but I don't know many people who have read it since it's so huge. Anyone tried this one? I'm only about 50 pages in and am enjoying it so far. It's set in a college town in Ohio just after the Civil War and follows (from what I've read about the book) a ladies literary club and its members through the 1930s.
    I was so intrigued by the plot you described I just went and reserved this book at the library. (For once I'm first in the queue so I'll get it in a couple of days.) I noticed that the author's DOB was given as 1895, so I googled and saw that she was 88 years old when this book was published.
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  7. #3197
    FORT Fogey
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Quote Originally Posted by Critical;2791434;
    I've now started Helen Hooven Santmyer's "... And Ladies of the Club", which is over 1400 pages and has been sitting on my bookshelf for about 3 years, since my mother loaned it to me. The people I know who have read it say it's wonderful, but I don't know many people who have read it since it's so huge. Anyone tried this one? I'm only about 50 pages in and am enjoying it so far. It's set in a college town in Ohio just after the Civil War and follows (from what I've read about the book) a ladies literary club and its members through the 1930s.
    I had not thought about that book in years, but I can remember when it first came out, my mother and grandmother LOVING that book. My mom rarely reads and entire book, and she did for that one. My mom's copy sat on her bookshelf for years. I may just have to check and see if she still has it. But as big as the book is, I would have to carefully choose the time I tried to read it. I do a lot of reading while soaking in the bathtub -- I'm not sure I coudl hold that one up to keep it dry!

  8. #3198
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    Re: What are you reading?

    Well, I've read another 50 pages of ...And Ladies of the Club today and am really loving it! Of course, at this pace, I won't finish it for a month! If anyone else reads it too, we can actually have a little discussion about it.

    I do need to correct my description of the book. It's not a college town, but a town where there's a private girls' school. Two of the main characters graduate from that school in the first chapter and it wasn't clear at first if it was a college or not.

    AJane - one review I read said that the author was actually a resident at a retirement home when she wrote the book. Pretty incredible.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  9. #3199
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    Re: What are you reading?

    I read In the Woods by Tana French and though it was okay. I rally hated the ending. I also read The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, which I loved. Now I'm reading A Thousand Splendid Suns. Hopefully it's better than The Kite Runner.
    "It is my belief, however, that the truth is generally preferable to lies..."

  10. #3200
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    Re: What are you reading?

    I just recently finished The Catcher in the Rye. It was the first time I've read it and am surprised at how I don't get how it is a classic. Sure, it must have been considered racy, if not vulgar, when it was written, but other then that I just don't get the big deal of the book.

    Now I'm half way through Red River.

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