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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2521
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    remote goddess, you might want to check out American Gods by Neil Gaiman, a dark fantasy novel that I found entertaining, well-written, and poignant. Or anything by Gaiman, really.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  2. #2522
    Teach your children Uncle David's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by remote_goddess;2286352;
    I've got Life of Pi and Dress Your Family in Courderoy and Denim
    Sedaris' book is great. Again I have the audio book read by David himself. Loved it.

    Let me know about Life if Pi. I have the book, but just couldnít get past the first 5 minutes. Canít remember why. Iíll give it another try if itís worth the effort.
    The funniest thing about this particular signature is that by the time you realise it doesn't say anything it's too late to stop reading it.

  3. #2523
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by remote_goddess;2286352;
    I think I'm in the mood for some good Fantasy/Sci-Fi. Anyone have any recommendations? A friend suggested the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy books (are there three?) with two thumbs up. Opinions?

    You might like our Sci-fi fantasy thread:
    Science Fantasy
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  4. #2524
    Crabby Cancerian remote_goddess's Avatar
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    Thanks Lucy! I will pop over and see what's hot. And thank you gtg, too. Is Gaiman the other auther who partnered with Terry Pratchett on... geez, what was the title of that book? I own it and cannot for the life of me think of it now! About the end of times, the demon Crawley, the angel, the boy and the dog, and the witch hunter?

  5. #2525
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    Yes, that's Neil Gaiman, Remote! "Good Omens." I loved that book, and in fact just read it a month or two ago and posted about it upthread. I'll second any recommendation of Gaiman, I always enjoy his books.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  6. #2526
    Crabby Cancerian remote_goddess's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle David;2286491;
    Sedaris' book is great. Again I have the audio book read by David himself. Loved it.

    Let me know about Life if Pi. I have the book, but just couldnít get past the first 5 minutes. Canít remember why. Iíll give it another try if itís worth the effort.
    I'll let you know how it goes once I delve in to Pi, and thanks for the input on the Sedaris book!

    And Lucy, you are my hero! I could not for the life of me remember that title. I know, I could have Googled it, but I wanted to see if I could force my brain to recall the information I wanted. I'm trying something new. It isn't working. Google is my friend. My memory is not.

  7. #2527
    FORT Regular swingkat's Avatar
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    I'm reading "Wicked : The life and times of the Wicked Witch of the West", by Gregory Maguire which was one of the books I had bought for myself as Xmas gift. I'm about halfway through. I know it's been said before, but it bears saying again: what a great book! Making a reviled character human and sympathetic is a great accomplishment, I think.

    Then reading upthread I was noticing that New Moon by Stephenie Meyer was mentioned and I was hoping to get some perspective. Last year, my then thirteen year old niece told me she had read Twilight, also by Stephenie Meyer and that she had loved it. I loaned her copy and read it and I liked it too. There was an aspect of the book though, that I found mildly disturbing. I haven't figured out how to add spoiler tags, so I can't be more specific, but like I said, I liked the story as a whole. This year, while searching for books on an internet bookstore, I found out that New Moon had come out and thinking it would be a good gift for my niece, I bought it. But now that I have read it, I'm not sure I should go ahead and give it to her and it's mostly because what I found disturbing in the first book is now even more apparent in the second. Then there's a part of me that tells me I'm being condescending and patronizing to my own niece, like if I'm saying in effect that she's too young/immature to figure out that it's just a fantasy. My niece is almost like my daughter and I know she would be so mad.

    Anyway, since I was reading so many rave reviews, I would appreciate any comments or opinions.

  8. #2528
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    Roma by Steven Saylor

    Saylor wrote a series of mystery novels and short stories set in the late Roman Republic featuring Gordianus the Finder. The first five of these were very interesting, as Saylor wove mysteries around Cicero’s first trial, Spartacus’ revolt, Clodius’ murder and Catilina’s conspiracy. After that I think Saylor kind of lost his way. Once he got to the Civil War neither the mysteries nor the history were as interesting. Instead, the plots became more focused on Gordianus and his increasing estrangement from his family.

    Roma is a multi-generational saga following one fictional Roman family from 1000 BC before there was even a settlement in Rome to Augustus’ reign in 1 BC. At least during the early segments Saylor uses the fictional characters, mixed in with historical (and legendary) characters to explain how Rome came to be settled and how it developed its traditions and beliefs.The shortness of the early segments has not permitted much character development, but I guess that is in the nature of these types of books. I am not sure this novel is what I expected. I thought that the history of Rome would be more in the background. Still it is pretty interesting, especially since this part of Rome’s history is not as familiar as is the latter days of the Roman Republic.
    "The sun rose promptly at dawn."
    Tom Clancy in his novel The Teeth of the Tiger

  9. #2529
    jessicaSTAM GossipGirlANTM's Avatar
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    Okay so in the past week I have read:

    Confessions Of a Not It Girl by Melissa Kantor, The Healing Time Of Hickeys by Karen Rivers, Megan Meade's Guide to the McGowan Boys by Kate Brian, and My Cup Runneth Over by Cherry Whytock. They're all Young Adult books (which I can get away with because I'm sixteen) and I really enjoyed Confessions Of a Not It Girl. It was heartwarming and I really related to the main character. The Healing Time Of Hickeys is another one that is really worth reading, I found the beginning to be a bit slow but it got a lot more interesting after the first 20 pages.

    Now I've started Something Borrowed by Emily Giffen. Has anybody read this book, and if you have, what did you think of it?

    Oh and Swingkat, to make spoiler tags, you type your spoiler in between the tags [ spoiler] [ /spoiler], without the spaces of course.
    I wish you had a favourite beauty spot that you loved secretly/'Cos it was on a hidden bit that nobody else could see/Basically, I wish that you loved me/I wish that you needed me/I wish that you knew when I said two sugars, actually I meant three. - Kate Nash, "Nicest Thing"

  10. #2530
    waiting for summer owlie's Avatar
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    The Virgin Suicides, by Jeffrey Euginides.

    Is the movie any where near as good as the book? I don't dare to watch it because I love this book so much. I am from a family of five daughters. My sisters were a little disturbed when I told them about this book

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