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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2441
    Retired! hepcat's Avatar
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    I thought only the romance genre was plagued with that type of writing, Amanda. I read one once that put the word Texas in all caps every time it appeared. And TEXAS appeared a lot; i.e., Being a ranch hand in the great state of TEXAS had its rewards, and Jake knew how to reap 'em with gusto. Just ask those TEXAS ladies and they'll tell ya.

    I'm reading Son of a Witch by Gregory Maguire. I was a little reluctant because it's hard to pick up where the first book leaves off, but it's drawn me in.
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    Coaster junkie vondl0's Avatar
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    Just starting The Thirteenth Tale and can tell I'm going to love it! Anyone else read it?

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    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    Teacher Man by Frank McCourt
    It's about his days as a teacher, written is his usual anecdotal style. It's not nearly as amusing or as well written as Angela's Ashes, but it does have it's moments.

    The Great War for Civilisation by Robert Fisk
    Fisk is a Middle East correspondent for the Independent
    This book is about his experiences during the past 27 years covering the Soviet invasion of Afganistan, the Iraq Revolution, the Iran-Iraq War and the Gulf Wars. (He has also written a separate book about the Lebanese Civil War). Fisk interview Bin Laden before anyone knew who he was. He met Ayotallah Khomeini and other Iranian leaders.
    The book could use a bit of editing (it's over 1200 pages) and Fisk's knowledge of history isn't perfect, but it makes for very interesting, if depressing, reading.

  4. #2444
    Just Forting Around roseskid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by William13;2218889;
    Teacher Man by Frank McCourt
    It's about his days as a teacher, written is his usual anecdotal style. It's not nearly as amusing or as well written as Angela's Ashes, but it does have it's moments.
    William. My thoughts on Teacher Man echo yours. My father was raised in Ireland about the same time as Frank, so I was attracted to the storyline of Angela's Ashes. But it was the wit and pathos of his writing that grabbed my heart. 'Tis was a little less profound, and Teacher Man was even moreso. I enjoyed it, but didn't get the same profound impact I did with his first book. Have you read any of Malachy's books? I've read A Monk Swimming . It was entertaining, but took some time for me to adjust to his flamboyant writing style.
    Last edited by roseskid; 01-28-2007 at 07:48 PM.
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  5. #2445
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    Finally got around to The Jane Austen Book Club, and I'm loving it. It's a really nice, relaxing read, and with a few bits of sly wit that would do Austen proud.
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    Who Dat lildago's Avatar
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    A friend just gave me her copy of Jennifer Weiner's Good In Bed. I'm planning to start it this week.
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  7. #2447
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roseskid;2219053;
    William. My thoughts on Teacher Man echo yours. My father was raised in Ireland about the same time as Frank, so I was attracted to the storyline of Angela's Ashes. But it was the wit and pathos of his writing that grabbed my heart. 'Tis was a little less profound, and Teacher Man was even moreso. I enjoyed it, but didn't get the same profound impact I did with his first book. Have you read any of Malachy's books? I've read A Monk Swimming . It was entertaining, but took some time for me to adjust to his flamboyant writing style.
    I did read A Monk Swimming a couple of years ago. I didn't like Malachy's writing style as much as Frank's, but it was a interesting getting a different take. I also saw a 2 person stage show (I forget what it was called), with 2 actors playing the parts of Frank and Malachy. Frank and Malachy used to perform it themselves years before Angela's Ashes was published. Many of the anecdotes turned up in their books, so it was kind of like watching a recitation and their anecdotal styles benefit from being told to an audience.

  8. #2448
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    I'm mostly through "The Last Templar" by Raymond Khouri. It's one of those "Da Vinci Code"-type genre books, which I typically enjoy, but I have to say, I just haven't really gotten into this one. The writing isn't great, the storyline is slow, and I'm just glad I didn't buy it in hardcover.
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    Now that classes have started, my recreational reading time is over. I have three seminars and another tough upper-division course (yes, I'm questioning my sanity), so it's all academic from now until May.

    I did just finish The Bowl is Already Broken by Mary Kay Zuravleff, about museum politics in the National Museum of Asian Art. I help run the book club at work and this was February's selection. Not Nobel Prize level, but a fun diversion.
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    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  10. #2450
    FORT Regular swingkat's Avatar
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    I've read several books this past month:

    The Oxford Murders by Guillermo Martinez: from the Guardian Book Review:
    "In The Oxford Murders, mathematical symbols are the key to a mysterious sequence of murders. Each new death is accompanied by a different mathematical shape, starting with the circle. This purest of mathematical forms heralds the death of Mrs Eagleton, landlady to a young South American mathematician who narrates the story. It seems that the serial killer can be stopped only if someone can crack the next symbol in the sequence. The maths graduate is joined by the leading Oxford logician Arthur Seldom on the quest to crack the cryptic clues." As an engineer, I enjoyed the mathematical and aspect of this story, and the way the more philosophical aspects of math are discussed. The murder mystery was a bit meh but as a whole I enjoyed the story.

    Ghost Story by Toby Litt: I accidentally came upon this book on the library and remembering having recently read favorable reviews at this forum , I picked it up. I soon discovered that "my" book and the book I had read in FORT about where not the same . This one actually contains three stories, two short ones (The Hare and Foxes) and a longer one (the actual Ghost Story) as well as an autobiographical introduction by the author. The central theme is bereavement and loss. Ghost Story is about a young couple, Agatha and Paddy who, expecting their second child, buy a new house for their family. When they lose the baby, they decide to move in to the house but leave their child, Max, in the care of his grandmother, so that Agatha can come to terms with the loss. Although it's not an easy read (at some point the novel describes almost exclusively what takes place in Agatha's mind in an almost stream of consciousness style ) I thought it was a gripping and moving story.

    I also read The Black Dahlia by James Ellroy, since I was planning on watching the recent Brian De Palma movie, despite all the negative reviews I'd heard. The story gave me nightmares but then again, I'm pretty impressionable.

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