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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2331
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    I just finished Card's Ender's Game tonight. I've heard such good things about it, but had just never read it. It was assigned reading in one of my classes, so I had an excuse to sit around with my nose in a book for a few days. I can definitely see why everyone loves this book I'll be buying a copy for my brother for Christmas.

    With the end of the semester looming, I don't know how much more "fun" reading I'll be doing in the near future. I can't even find time to get through a magazine article! I do have Connelly's Echo Park sitting nearby, tempting me. I may not be able to say no to Harry Bosch for much longer!

    Geek - I can't wait to hear about your adventures with Stephen King! Please post pics if you get any. My brother (who has firsts of nearly every King book published) would be so envious!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  2. #2332
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
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    Critical, I really liked Ender's Game. I'm a big OSC fan. Have you read Magic Street?

    Geek, you lucky thing, I hope you get to take pictures. Do report back and tell us everything.
    Well I was born in a small town
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  3. #2333
    FORT Fan kattatude's Avatar
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    I'm currently reading All Over but the Shoutin' a memoir by Rick Bragg. He is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times. He grew up dirt poor in the South, and this book is about his father who was a drunk that ran out on his family, and his mother who worked picking cotton in order to raise her family. I haven't gotten far in the book yet, but so far, so good.

  4. #2334
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dinahann;2135621;
    Critical, I really liked Ender's Game. I'm a big OSC fan. Have you read Magic Street?
    Dinah, the only other OSC book I've read is Enchantment, which I loved. I'll put Magic Street on my list

    kattatude, I really enjoyed All Over But the Shoutin'. If memory serves, Rick Bragg quit/was forced out of the New York Times a few years ago over questionable reporting practices in using interns and stringers without crediting them. . Still, I think he's a good writer. I also enjoyed Ava's Man, which was about his grandfather.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  5. #2335
    FORT Fan kattatude's Avatar
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    Critical, I didn't know that about Rick Bragg. I do like his writing style, also. I plan on reading Ava's Man soon. My sister had recommended both books to me quite a while back, and I just ran across All Over but the Shoutin' at a local library. I'm glad I picked it up.

  6. #2336
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    I met him, I met him, I met him!

    I'll post the full story, along with some visual aids, in the Lisey's Story thread sometime tomorrow.

    I went a bit crazy at Foyle's (a book worm's dream!) over the weekend, so much so that I had to check in my luggage. Here are the books I bought:

    - Travels in the Scriptorium by Paul Auster. I started it on the flight home and am now just a couple of pages from the end. It's a slim affair, no more than 130 odd pages, but Auster still manages to intertwine the story with his entire back catalogue. Auster fans will recognise most of the characters, as well as the metafictive devices which are unusually post-modern and elaborate even for Auster. There's a distinct Kafka-esque vibe to the story as well. A must-read for fans, but although I personally loved it, I'm not sure I'd recommend it to those new to the intriguing world of Paul Auster as all of the references to his previous novels would go straight over your head unless you've read them all.
    - Blackbird House by Alice Hoffman (love anything she's ever written, so this is bound to be a treat)
    - Until the Real Thing Comes Along by Elizabeth Berg.
    - Dry: A Memoir by Augusten Burroughs. Seeing how much I loved Running With Scissors, this was a must. If I'm not mistaken, several FORTers have already read it, no?
    - A hardcover that seemed very promising indeed, but I can't remember the title nor the author; I do know that her first name was Elisabeth and that the cover had a picture of a bookshelf. Now, is anyone surprised that I went for that book? I'll check the title when I get home tonight.

    Mmm, books.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  7. #2337
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    I'm reading Don't Get Too Comfortable: The Indignities of Coach Class, the Torments of Low Thread Count, the Never-Ending Quest for Artisanal Olive Oil, and Other First World Problems by David Rakoff. Hilarious, but will make me feel a little self-conscious when I go out to buy a bottleof Tuscan cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil and a bottle of red wine on my lunch hour today .
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  8. #2338
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    Climbing Solsbury Hill CCL's Avatar
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    ^ Sounds funny, Rattus.

    About to crack open Robert Fagles' translation of The Aeneid. I loved his translations of The Iliad and The Odyssey so I have high hopes.
    If you type "google" into google you can break the internet.

  9. #2339
    FORT Newbie DontCryOut's Avatar
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    I just finished reading Running With Scissors. Great book. Went to see the movie and it followed the book exactly except for a few differences.

  10. #2340
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    Okay, I started and finished Connelly's Echo Park this week. Once I mentioned the fact that it was sitting nearby, I couldn't help myself! It took me a few chapters to get into it - probably because I've been reading lots of art theory lately and I had to change gears - but then I couldn't put it down. I was actually a few hours late for work on Monday because I picked it up to read a chapter and couldn't stop! The ending wasn't super-shocking, but it was great to be back in Harry Bosch's world for a while.

    I finally dug into the pile of advanced reader copies I got at the booksellers' convention last month. I'm reading The Sisters Mortland by Sally Beauman and I LOVE IT. The writing is so beautiful and simple that I want to savor it. I'm only about 50 pages in, so not a huge amount of plot development yet, but I can't wait to find out what happens. The action takes place in the summer of 1967 and then in 1991. I'm back in 1967 with the first person narration of the youngest Mortland sister, Maisie. Here's a little glimpse of the 14-year old Maisie: "A chicken and a guinea fowl are roasting - Celia and Rosalind are roasting. They've been basted with butter and sprinkled with thyme, and they smell tempting, but I won't be eating them. I am now a vegetarian: Someone has to take a stand." I've gotten completely sucked into this story.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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