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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2301
    FORTfruity applesauce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskitty;2106575;
    I'm going to give Memoirs of a Geisha a try. My sinister says it was good.
    misskitty, I really enjoyed reading Memoirs of a Geisha! Good choice.

  2. #2302
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    chicken soup

  3. #2303
    waiting for summer owlie's Avatar
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    After this, come in order of appearance in my book pile: "The Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini, "The Bookseller in Kabul" by Åsne Seierstad, "The Broker" by John Grisham and, finally, a reread of "The Client" by the same author, all of which should hopefully tide me over until at least mid-november .
    I loved The Bookseller in Kabul. Let us know what you think when you get to that part of your pile!

  4. #2304
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    I'm about one third into Lisey's Story by Stephen King. So far, so good. It strikes me as his most person novel to date; it's almost impossible not to draw comparisons between certain plot points and the near-fatal accident King had a few years ago. Theme-wise, it's also very reminiscent of Bag of Bones, although so far, Bag of Bones remains the better novel between the two. I'll post a more thorough review (with spoiler tags, since the book isn't even out in the U.S. yet) when I'm done.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  5. #2305
    FORTfruity applesauce's Avatar
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    I just finished "early bird" by Rodney Rothman.

    It's a "memoir of premature retirement" by a 28 year old. The author was burnt out as a television writer and without a job (at one point he was a joke writer for David Letterman). He decides to try early retirement by moving to Florida and living in a retirement village with an older woman as a roommate.

    It was an easy read. At times super funny and at times a bit sad. I found it to be an interesting glimpse into the Florida retirement social scene.

  6. #2306
    FORT Fan Shaybo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl;2055435;
    You're way ahead of me - very cool! If you haven't already, you must pick up A Grave Talent, the very first Martinelli novel. It's by far the best one in my opinion, and it deserves every single award it got.

    And yes, I admire Laurie R. King for having a lesbian protagonist. Of course, in this day and age, writing openly and honestly about gay relationships shouldn't be a big deal, but let's face it: to a lot of people (too many people!) it still is. So yeah, props for King. Kate and Lee make such a great couple, and I love how King portrays their relationship. When I read A Grave Talent, it took me at least a hundred pages to realise that Kate's partner was in fact a woman, though.

    ETA: I should read people's posts properly before I post. You've already read all the Martinelli books, right? If so, I suggest you look into her stand-alones, Folly, Keeping Watch, and A Darker Place. I haven't read them - don't ask me why, because I'm a big fan of hers and will read just about everything she publishes. Lack of time, I guess - so I'd be very interested in your opinion.
    Hey GTG, Its me Shaybo, but I'm signed in as Squeeker for right now. I just finished Folly and boy was it good I got the book Tuesday and I just finished reading it. It was definately a different read then all her other books this was more like a psych thriller then anything else. Its a story about a woman who goes insane after her husband and second daughter die in a drunk driving accident after she comes out of the hospital she goes to a house and an island that shes inheirited from her Great Uncle Desmond all the while she has flash backs of what happened to her after her husband dies and she finds out what really happened to her Uncle Desmond. Plus she finds out the truth about what really drove her over the edge. I think you'll really enjoy it. Now I'm reading Keeping Watch the main character was also in Folly. I'll let you know how it goes.

  7. #2307
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    I just started The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War by Lynn H. Nicholas. Sounds dry, I know, but it's the exact opposite. Yes, I'm an art geek (proudly ), but the writing is so good that it reads like an adventure story: both fascinating and terrifying.

    I've got Connelly's Echo Park on the way to my door as we speak. I'll be sure to give a review for all the other Connelly addicts.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  8. #2308
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Critical;2119702;

    I've got Connelly's Echo Park on the way to my door as we speak. I'll be sure to give a review for all the other Connelly addicts.
    Sounds great! My dad, a fellow Connelly addict, is currently reading Echo Park and loving it. I'll make sure to pick it up as soon as I've gone through the pile next to my bed. (It might take a while...)

    My next read will hopefully be an unusual and intriguing one. Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marissa Pearl has been compared to my all-time favourite novel, The Secret History by Donna Tartt, and has an interesting set-up: each chapter of the novel is named after a literary classic. I'm not sure to which extent, but I do know that a post-modern murder mystery with literary themes sound like a dream come true. Has anyone read this?
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  9. #2309
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    I'm reading the new Vince Flynn book, "Act of Treason". I'm so over Mitch Rapp and Vince Flynn, but I have this OCD that once I start a series of books about a character, I can't stop. Dean Koontz could spend the rest of his life churning out crap books about Odd Thomas, and I'd buy and read every one of them. And then be pissed at myself for having done so after every book.

  10. #2310
    Resident curmudgeon Newfherder's Avatar
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    I'm re-reading, for about the fifteenth time in the past 20 years, Clear the Bridge by Adm. Richard O'Kane. If you like "I was there" history, this is the best (of the dozens that I've read) first-person account of the submarine's contribution to victory over Japan in WW2. Adm. O'Kane was the skipper of Tang, one of the most successful US subs, and he is also one heck of a good writer.
    "The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination."
    --Marion Zimmer Bradley

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