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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2231
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    I love Agatha Christie, and read most of hers back in high school, which means I remember very few of them by now, so eventually I'll have that pleasure all over again. Like Rattus, though, I do remember whodunnit in the Murder of Roger Ackroyd. And I remember the ending of Murder on the Orient Express. Other than that, I don't think I ever figured out villains till the end.
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  2. #2232
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    That's funny - I read Agatha Christie in high school as well. In fact, I remember doing a book report on The Mirror Crack'd in grade nine.

    I just finished Anansi Boys - finally got my hands on a copy! - and am picking up another long-awaited read, In Cold Blood, from the library today. I'm a true crime fan, but somehow missed reading Capote, the originator of the genre.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
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  3. #2233
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    AJane, as a true crime fan you may have already read these, but two of my favourites (probably not the right word) in the genre are Son, by Jack Olsen and Waverley Place, by Susan Brownmiller. Son is the story of Fred Coe, a serial rapist who lived in Spokane in the 80s, and Waverley Place is a roman a clef about Joel Steinberg and Hedda Nussbaum. Both of them horrified me, made me cry, and left a long, long lasting impression.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  4. #2234
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    The Dante Club by Matthew Pearl
    "The sun rose promptly at dawn."
    Tom Clancy in his novel The Teeth of the Tiger

  5. #2235
    FORT Regular swingkat's Avatar
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    ETA: "Something wicked this way comes" is a quote from Macbeth and comes directly after the "By the pricking of my thumbs" line, so it's not that strange a title. It is strange, though, that there are two alternate titles out there.
    Getting a bee on my bonnet about why the book would have been called differently, I called my mom last night and made her look in my book shelfs for the copy of my book I found out that I in fact read the Spanish translation of the novel. I guess that explains why the title of the book was changed, since "By the pricking of my thumbs" would have been pretty much nonsense in Spanish. As for the Miss Marple miniseries, I have enjoyed it, despite all the poetic licences they've taken with the novels (besides Tuppence's drinking problem and Tommy becoming a pompous ass, they've changed the murderer in "Body in the library", shown a couple of lesbian relationships that in the books either did not exist or were at the most hinted at, and even given Miss Marple a romantic past, involving apparently a married man *gasp* to name a few changes). Maybe they do this to give all characters a bit more humanity?? In any case, I have loved the beautiful English countryside settings, the manor houses and the cars and specially the customs. I would love to be able to wear that kind of clothes, gorgeous dresses, with hats and gloves, and even those tweed suits with cardigans and a string of pearls.*sigh*. Living in Sweden (and I don't mean to offend any of the wonderful Swedish forum members ) it's sometimes hard not to feel overdressed when you're not wearing jeans . Oh well, I guess if I did have to dress up every day, I would be complaining about the lack of comfort .

    ETA: And to keep on topic (sorry for rambling on) I'm reading "The Eyre Affair" by Jasper Fforde. A lot of fun! Oh and AJane, I just read "In Cold Blood" and I thought it was a riveting read. It scared me to think that violence can be so random....
    Last edited by swingkat; 08-15-2006 at 05:47 PM.

  6. #2236
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
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    Rattus - I've read several of Jack Olsen's books (his passing was a real loss to the genre) and assumed Son was about David Berkowitz - I think Berkowitz has been analyzed to death so I never bothered checking out the Olsen book. I'll definitely check it out now.
    I do own a book about the Lisa Steinberg case, but now that I'm a mother to little girls myself, I can't bear to revisit that particular case.

    Actually, I find I'm a lot more sensitive to crime stories now - the ones that involve kids tear me to shreds. Off topic, but I finally found a DVD of Paradise Lost this past weekend, and I found myself looking away from the crime photo scenes.

    William, how are you finding The Dante Club? I recently read Matthew Pearl's other novel, The Poe Shadow, and found I didn't enjoy it nearly as much as Dante Club - took me forever to slog through it.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

  7. #2237
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus View Post
    AJane, as a true crime fan you may have already read these, but two of my favourites (probably not the right word) in the genre are Son, by Jack Olsen and Waverley Place, by Susan Brownmiller. Son is the story of Fred Coe, a serial rapist who lived in Spokane in the 80s, and Waverley Place is a roman a clef about Joel Steinberg and Hedda Nussbaum. Both of them horrified me, made me cry, and left a long, long lasting impression.
    Son was probably my favorite true crime book of all time. As creepy as he was, his mom was even creepier. I got the book used and it finally fell apart after I'd read it several times and passed it on to my mother and friends.
    Well I was born in a small town
    And I can breathe in a small town
    Gonna die in this small town
    And that's prob'ly where they'll bury me

  8. #2238
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AJane View Post
    [Actually, I find I'm a lot more sensitive to crime stories now - the ones that involve kids tear me to shreds.
    I'm not a mother, but I am the happy cohabitant of a couple of cats, and I find that I can't bear reading anything remotely resembling animal abuse, fictional or real. I recently read A Simple Plan and I had to sort of skim the pages where the narrator described leaving his dead brother's dog tied up in the yard for days on end, I cried when I read about the villagers beating the horse to death in Crime & Punishment, and at the end of Cellular, I wasn't remotely interested in whether the son regained his sanity, I just wanted to know what happened to the cat.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  9. #2239
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swingkat View Post
    I would love to be able to wear that kind of clothes, gorgeous dresses, with hats and gloves, and even those tweed suits with cardigans and a string of pearls.*sigh*. Living in Sweden (and I don't mean to offend any of the wonderful Swedish forum members ) it's sometimes hard not to feel overdressed when you're not wearing jeans . Oh well, I guess if I did have to dress up every day, I would be complaining about the lack of comfort .
    Where in Sweden do you live? In Stockholm, where I live, I seem to suffer from the opposite problem. I was out powerwalking (not quite jogging, not quite a leisurely stroll - great exercise! But I digress) with a friend through central Stockholm the other day and felt like a total bum in my sweatpants, tanktop, and sneakers. My friend was looking like something out of an Agatha Christie novel, and so were half the people we walked by. I wanted to beam myself home and slip into something more lady-like. Ordinarily, I'll all about dresses and pearls and heels, and I usually don't feel overdressed.

    Moving back on topic now... (Sorry!)

    Quote Originally Posted by Rattus View Post
    I'm not a mother, but I am the happy cohabitant of a couple of cats, and I find that I can't bear reading anything remotely resembling animal abuse, fictional or real. I recently read A Simple Plan and I had to sort of skim the pages where the narrator described leaving his dead brother's dog tied up in the yard for days on end, I cried when I read about the villagers beating the horse to death in Crime & Punishment, and at the end of Cellular, I wasn't remotely interested in whether the son regained his sanity, I just wanted to know what happened to the cat.
    Oh my, can I relate. Like you, I'm a cat person all the way, and depictions of animals being tortured just kill me. That scene from Crime and Punishment made me bawl like a baby, and it haunted me for weeks after I'd finished reading. Oddly enough, the actual crime didn't have that effect on me at all. Don't even get me started on Black Beauty. It was one of my favourite books growing up, but I must have been a masochist back then, because the pages are still stiff with all the tears I shed. Oh, poor, poor Ginger.

    Rattus and all other cat lovers should steer clear of The Shape of Snakes by Minette Walters. There is a description of a woman and her mistreated cats that almost literally made me sick, since it reminds me of my own babies' living quarters before they were rescued by an animal shelter.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  10. #2240
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
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    Geek, I felt the same about the killing of the old woman in C&P vs. the killing of the horse, but I've always been a little embarrassed to admit it. Thanks for getting me to open up .

    I read The Shape of Snakes and in general loved it (love Minette Walters), but yeah, the cats. Nothing will make me cry faster or harder than hearing or reading about tormented cats. I fear that it's confirmed - I will be a crazy cat lady some day, but my furry little friends will be clean and well cared for.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

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