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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2201
    Looking for a way out Bubba-Jo-Lyn's Avatar
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    Don't know if there are any LKH fans in the group but I just got her newest Danse Macabre and I can't wait to start reading it. The sex stuff can be a bit much at times but the books are still enjoyable. Anita Blake is such a fantastic main character that even after 13 books there's still more to learn about her as she grows and matures.
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  2. #2202
    waiting for summer owlie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harvest View Post
    I am almost through That Old Ace in the Hole by Annie Proulx (author of The Shipping News, Brokeback Mountain, et. al.)

    It is a finely written, very satisfying piece of American literature.

    Some people go for "lite" summer reading, but I like a book that has some meat on its bones and takes longer than a day to finish. It is an entertaining, pleasant read, but has substance. I think she did a lot of research, almost like a cultural anthropologist, before she started writing the novel.

    Harvest, I just finished That Old Ace in the Hole and I loved it too. Then I listened to it on CD and loved it even more. The reader was fabulous. I think it is just about the finest piece of writing I've come across in a while. The characterizations and descriptions are so vivid and true. Fantastic all around!

  3. #2203
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Harry Bosch is the leading man in my life at the moment as I'm working my way through all of Michael Connelly's Bosch novels. Terrific summer reading: dark, thrilling, well-written and so completely absorbing that the tan you've been longing for suddenly appears without you even realizing it - you're so sucked into the dark underbelly of LAPD that the hours on the beach pass by like that.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  4. #2204
    Premium Member Yeti Long Shot: Porpoheus Champion
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    Dare I say I'm reading Tommyland? (Tommy Lee's autobio.) Not quite the intellectual choice others have made, but it's cute and entertaining, however definitely NOT for the kiddies!

  5. #2205
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.D. View Post
    Dare I say I'm reading Tommyland? (Tommy Lee's autobio.) Not quite the intellectual choice others have made, but it's cute and entertaining, however definitely NOT for the kiddies!
    J.D., have you read The Dirt, Neil Strauss' kick-ass biography on Mötley Crüe? If not, you should pick it up pronto. It's a hilarious, often jaw-dropping, well-written and constantly entertaining read, and it takes the concept of sex, drugs, and rock'n'roll to a whole new level.

    By the way, did Tommy Lee write his autobiography himself? All celebrities should hire Neil Strauss when they want their life story told; besides Mötley Crüe, he's also done a fabulous job dishing the dirt on Marilyn Manson, Jenna Jameson, and Dave Navarro. Outrageous celebrities and a good writer is a match made in heaven, I'm telling you.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  6. #2206
    Premium Member Yeti Long Shot: Porpoheus Champion
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    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl View Post
    J.D., have you read The Dirt, Neil Strauss' kick-ass biography on Mötley Crüe? If not, you should pick it up pronto. It's a hilarious, often jaw-dropping, well-written and constantly entertaining read, and it takes the concept of sex, drugs, and rock'n'roll to a whole new level.

    By the way, did Tommy Lee write his autobiography himself? All celebrities should hire Neil Strauss when they want their life story told; besides Mötley Crüe, he's also done a fabulous job dishing the dirt on Marilyn Manson, Jenna Jameson, and Dave Navarro. Outrageous celebrities and a good writer is a match made in heaven, I'm telling you.

    First, hi Geek! Long time no see.

    I haven't read The Dirt, but I intend to. Tommy Lee references it in his book. And there's nothing I'd rather read about than sex, drugs and rock'n'roll!! How's this for scary: my daughter, a die-hard Motley fan, gave it to me to read! She's 26, but I hate the thought of my (once) little girl knowing about these things!!

    I believe Tommy did write most of his book, he does mention his co-writer - and he even has a cute part in the book. It's pretty obvious Tommy hasn't a clue how to write a book, but the guy can tell a story that'll keep you chuckling all the way through!

    Oh, and he's not a big fan of the Kid Rock. Go figure.

    I'm gonna go pick up The Dirt right away!

  7. #2207
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Well, I finally got In the Company of the Courtesan by Sarah Dunant in the mail from my mom. I predicted that whatever I was reading would immediately be put aside and I was right! This one is just as absorbing as The Birth of Venus. I've been a little "off" books for the last few months - always reading something, but not caught up in a book so much that I can't wait to pick it back up. That's over now! Dunant has such a talent for crafting character and plot and for painting a picture. I feel like I'm right there in 16th century Venice. I can't wait to find out what happens next, but I don't want it to end.

    My mom also sent me Stewart O'Nan's The Good Wife, The Liar's Club by Mary Karr, Ursula Under by Ingrid Hill and The Falls by Joyce Carol Oates. So geek (since you're our resident expert on Oates) - have you read The Falls? What did you think?
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  8. #2208
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Critical View Post
    So geek (since you're our resident expert on Oates) - have you read The Falls? What did you think?
    You're in for a treat - The Falls is one of Oates' best efforts in years. Epic, beautifully written, with excellent characterization. Definitely her best novel since Blonde. I'm the first to admit that Oates doesn't always deliver; it seems that the more books she puts out there, the more uneven she becomes. For each masterpiece, there are at least a few lacklustre efforts. So I was very pleasantly surprised to pick up The Falls. Let me know how you like it! Have you read any of her previous works?
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  9. #2209
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    Back to the Barset series with Framley Parsonage by Anthony Trollope, even though I didn't really like Doctor Thorne. It was the first time that I didn't enjoy one of Trollope's books. It seemed like a long story in which nothing happened and none of the characters were very interesting.
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  10. #2210
    Obama '08! Callie's Avatar
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    I'm currently reading A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry. I've just started it, so here's to hoping that it's a good book.

    The setting of Mistry's quietly magnificent second novel (after the acclaimed Such a Long Journey) is India in 1975-76, when Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, defying a court order calling for her resignation, declares a state of emergency and imprisons the parliamentary opposition as well as thousands of students, teachers, trade unionists and journalists. These events, along with the government's forced sterilization campaign, serve as backdrop for an intricate tale of four ordinary people struggling to survive. Naive college student Maneck Kohlah, whose parents' general store is failing, rents a room in the house of Dina Dalal, a 40-ish widowed seamstress. Dina acquires two additional boarders: hapless but enterprising itinerant tailor Ishvar Darji and his nephew Omprakash, whose father, a village untouchable, was murdered as punishment for crossing caste boundaries. With great empathy and wit, the Bombay-born, Toronto-based Mistry evokes the daily heroism of India's working poor, who must cope with corruption, social anarchy and bureaucratic absurdities. Though the sprawling, chatty narrative risks becoming as unwieldy as the lives it so vibrantly depicts, Mistry combines an openness to India's infinite sensory detail with a Dickensian rendering of the effects of poverty, caste, envy, superstition,corruption and bigotry. His vast, wonderfully precise canvas poses, but cannot answer, the riddle of how to transform a corrupt, ailing society into a healthy one.

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