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Thread: What are you reading?

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    American Psyco by Bret Easton Ellis

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    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brothahj View Post
    American Psyco by Bret Easton Ellis
    Let us know how you feel about it when you're done. I'm an Ellis fan - his latest effort, Lunar Park, is the best he's written in years - but I have to say that American Psycho was a bit too disturbing even for me. Some of the scenes almost made me physically sick.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

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    What are you Reading

    I just finished reading Fern Michaels" Hey, Good Looking." and am just starting on a novel by Catherine Cookson called "Riley".

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    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl View Post
    Let us know how you feel about it when you're done. I'm an Ellis fan - his latest effort, Lunar Park, is the best he's written in years - but I have to say that American Psycho was a bit too disturbing even for me. Some of the scenes almost made me physically sick.
    Me too, geek. American Psycho remains the only book that I've ever thrown across the room. I really did not need those images in my head and I seriously questioned Ellis' mental state for having thought that stuff up. I understood his point (I think), but I just didn't care. I finished it only because I skimmed/skipped the murder scenes.

    After urging from my mother and a good friend, I started Edna Ferber's Saratoga Trunk. It's a nice switch from more serious fare I've been reading lately. Plus, it's a little paperback instead of the huge hardcovers I've had to lug back and forth to work.

    I still feel like I have a whole summer of reading stretching out in front of me, but I know that fall semester will be here so quickly and I won't have nearly enough time to read everything I want to read.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    A Roman Ransom by Rosemary Rowe - a mystery taking place during 2nd century Roman occupied Britain. I have to force myself to put it down. The mystery itself is not that compelling but I really like the characters and the atmosphere.

    Notre-Dame of Paris by Victor Hugo
    I am just getting started on this, so I don't have an opinion yet. I did like les Miserables, which I read years ago.
    "The sun rose promptly at dawn."
    Tom Clancy in his novel The Teeth of the Tiger

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    FORT Regular swingkat's Avatar
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    I started my vacation last week after a really hectic month so besides catching up on sleep, I've finally been making some inroads in my summer reading . At the moment I'm reading The Dante Club by Matthew Pearl, a murder mystery set in late 1800's Boston. So far so good: the novel has a dashing and handsome policeman who is also the first African-American member of the police force in Boston, the book title's eponymous club comprised of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell and their publisher J.T. Fields in the unlikely role of amateur detectives, a corrupt and greedy police department and a cruel, cold blooded, cunning and so far invisible killer. I've read about one third of the book and I'm quite enjoying it. The story has a certain cinematic quality to it, not unlike the Da Vinci Code, although not quite as blatant. Nevertheless I haven't been able to stop playing the "casting the role" game which I always take as a sign of too much of a script like quality in a book.

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    I've just started The Genius in the Design: Bernini, Borromini and the Rivalry That Transformed Rome by Jake Morrissey. It's about the rivalry between these two artists who worked (for a time, at least) together on St. Peter's in Rome during the 16th century. We're considering it as a book club selection for work, so I volunteered to read it (I would have read it anyway ) It got me from the first page:
    Suicide is never an easy death. Its details can be simple, its execution effortless, even graceful. But the pain that incites it in the first place, the angiush that breeds the longing for self-destruction, never fades. It stands out on the soul like a welt on tender skin, aching and raw. Even after the deed is done, the mark remains - a last, terrible legacy of a life lived in torment.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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    As I Lay Dying by Faulkner

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    I'm reading Garlic and Sapphires by Ruth Reichl. Good book if you like reading about food & restaurant reviews.

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    Well, I finally finished Ghost Story by Peter Straub. The reason why it took me so long really speaks volumes of Straub's strength as a horror writer - and my own cowardly ways. I couldn't read it when I was home alone, and certainly not at night, so my reading was restricted to "safe" environments such as the beach or a sunny patio in the middle of the day. Not sure if that strategy worked, though: if anything, the contrast between the bright sun and the snow-covered haunted town of Milburn might have freaked me out even more! It's been ages since a book has had this effect on me. I'm fairly well-read when it comes to the horror genre and very few novels manage to truly freak me out, but this one has given me repeated nightmares. I actually woke up screaming in the middle of the night after one of Straub's ghastly creatures was kind enough to visit me in my dreams. My fiancÚ, bless him, fears that my addiction to anything horror (or, as he put it, "that horrible stuff you keep exposing yourself to") has finally taken its toll on my sanity. "Great, but not for the faint of heart" is a phrase that comes to mind when trying to describe Ghost Story. Still, I'd recommend it to anyone who's interested in exploring the contemporary horror genre. Despite - or probably because of - its blatant creepiness, Ghost Story is an engrossing, literate read. To me, it read like a hybrid between Stephen King's It (which, incidentally, also gave me nightmares for a week when I read it - see, good horror novels are supposed to have that effect on you!) and the classic ghost stories of Hawthorne, James, and Wharton. To further illustrate the connection with the traditional ghost story, Straub even named his two main characters Hawthorne and James. Intertextuality at its finest.

    Needless to say, my next read will have to be of the soothing, light-hearted kind. How appropriate, then, that I got The Jane Austen Book Club by Karen Joy Fowler along with a magazine I bought the other week. The Jane Austen/reading group/chick lit combo seems irresistible, especially after a week and a half of ghouls, werewolves, and shapeshifters.

    We're off to visit relatives in the north of Sweden tomorrow morning, so I won't be online for a while. I'll definitely have plenty to post about when I return, though, since I intend to get a lot of reading done while my man is out fishing. Apart from The Jane Austen Book Club, I also plan on bringing along the latest novels from Anne Tyler, Anita Shreve, and Jodi Picoult. Since OD'ing on contemporary women's fiction seems like a likely scenario, I'll also pack Black House by Stephen King and Peter "you owe geek the girl a week's worth of blissful, uninterrupted sleep!" Straub and Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman. Oh, and Body Double by Tess Geritsen. Has anyone read anything by her? I got it as a gift from a friend of my sister's - we bonded over our mutual love of gory crime novels, Tess Geritsen's name came up and before I knew it, she gave me a book! She'll now be my maid of honour. Kidding, but it really was a sweet gesture. Harlan Coben is apparently a fan of Tess Geritsen, which sounds very promising indeed.

    I got my holiday reading all sorted, as you can see.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

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