+ Reply to Thread
Like Tree260Likes

Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2101
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Playing kickball for the beer
    Age
    38
    Posts
    8,870
    Ajane, I might have to give some of those recommendations a try, as I miss the fact that I'll never get to read "Coraline" or "Starlight" for the first time again. I do love those of Gaiman's, but they do seem more like fairy tale than adult fantasy fiction to me. Which I love -- I just steered Geek toward others of Gaiman's because I don't know if everyone likes the fairy-tale feel.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  2. #2102
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    Quote Originally Posted by AJane View Post
    To me Gaiman is like a less-gory Clive Barker. Have you ever read any of Barker's stuff? Imajica is a lengthy read but also has the fantasy/real world balance, as does Weaveworld (my personal favourite). Barker's imagery is more vivid than Gaiman's, though I do think Gaiman's Coraline is superior to Barker's Books of Blood (if we're talking shorter stories - Coraline is more of a novella).
    No, I haven't, but I love the Hellraiser movies - my boyfriend and I are so invested in Pinhead that we even watch the more recent, admittedly crappy ones. Clive Barker wrote Hellraiser, didn't he? While I'll gladly admit that I'm slightly biased towards fantasy (but hey, I'm working on it! I've got The Gunslinger all ready to go on my nightstand! ), I am a sucker for horror and usually don't mind alternate universes when they're placed in an overall horror context. So I'll definitely give Barker a go. As for Gaiman, I just learned that Neverwhere takes place in the London underground, which made me want to run to the nearest bookstore and get it, pronto. My relationship to the London underground (that's subway for you Americans ) is a strange and passionate one.

    Which reminds me: if any of you share my strange passion, you ought to check out Tunnel Vision by British author Keith Lowe. It deals with a guy who attempts to visit every underground station in London's enormous transportation system. It sounds geeky, and it probably is, but hey, since when is that a bad thing? I should probably add that there's nothing remotely fantasy-ish about this one; it reads more like a Nick Hornby/Tony Parsons novel.

    Rattus, I loved Stiff! (Full title: Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavres; author: Mary Roach.) I've always been fascinated by death, the way that our Western society tries to act as if it doesn't exist. This novel answered a lot of questions I would never actually ask, but I'm glad the author asked them for me. Mary Roach has a great sense of humour, but she's never disrespectful about the corpses she encounters, is she? I must admit, though, as much as I fancy myself to be a tough gal, some of the chapters really shouldn't be read while drinking coffee. I felt nauseous several times. Never gagged, though, which apparently several people have.

    Mary Roach has a recent-ish book out about the notion of the soul and the afterlife. I think it's called Spook. I'll definitely pick it up at some point. Non-fiction that is informative, well-written AND funny is hard to come by.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  3. #2103
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Playing kickball for the beer
    Age
    38
    Posts
    8,870
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
    I read it, and I pretty much agree with you -- I prefer Thursday, but this was still enjoyable. It IS going to be a series -- Nursery Crimes. So presumably the "fourth bear" is in relation to the Three Bears of Goldilocks fame.

    God, that post was a long time ago.

    Anyway, just informing fellow Fforde fans, that Fourth Bear book is due out next month.

    http://www.jasperfforde.com/nextbook.html
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  4. #2104
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    Speaking of Gaiman:

    According to imdb, there's a movie adaption of Stardust in the making, to be released in 2007. The cast is pretty impressive - Robert de Niro, my personal favourite Claire Danes, Michelle Pfeiffer, the lovely Rubert Everett, and current it girl Sienna Miller. Here's the link: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0486655/

    Any thoughts?
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  5. #2105
    Toby's Slave kimrs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,806
    Right now I am reading 4th of July by James Patterson. A friend loaned me The 5th Horseman and then I realized that I didn't know who the new character was, so I bought 4th.

  6. #2106
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    In the trees
    Age
    54
    Posts
    6,911
    I'm just about finished My cat Spit McGee by Willie Morris, the author of My Dog Skip. I enjoy nothing more than reading about the journey from ailurophobe to ailurophile. I'm reading it at the same time I'm finishing off King's Oak by Anne Rivers Siddons, which is irritating the hell out of me. I find the protagonist repugnant and I've always thought enormous numbers of metaphors to be a poor substitute for a good story. But I've gotten this far and I DID pay 50 cents for it , so finish it I shall.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  7. #2107
    CCL
    CCL is offline
    Climbing Solsbury Hill CCL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Here and there
    Posts
    8,635
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
    God, that post was a long time ago.

    Anyway, just informing fellow Fforde fans, that Fourth Bear book is due out next month.

    http://www.jasperfforde.com/nextbook.html
    I'm excited!
    There's supposed to be a new Thursday Next book next year.
    If you type "google" into google you can break the internet.

  8. #2108
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    46
    Posts
    16,894
    Gosh, it's been a while since I've been in here to report on my summer reading! I finished Captain Alatriste by Arturo Perez-Reverte, a sort of swashbuckling adventure set in 17th century Spain, a few weeks ago.

    Now, I'm about two hundred pages from finishing Sharon Kaye Penman's marvelous When Christ and His Saints Slept about the battle for the English crown in the 12th century. This is the first of a trilogy about Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitane. I've read four others by Penman, but this one has been on my shelf for about ten years waiting for the right time. I recommended Penman to a friend and she picked this one. I figured I'd better read it too. When you recommend a 700+ page book to someone, it had better be good! It's been probably ten years since I read my last Penman book - probably The Sunne in Splendour, about Richard III. For those who love historical fiction, I highly recommend this author She's a wonderful storyteller and a meticulous researcher.

    Count me as another who has Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell waiting on a bookshelf! I don't know if I can wait until winter, so it might be read in the heat of summer.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  9. #2109
    giz
    giz is offline
    FORT Fogey giz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,895
    Egg Thoughts and other Francis Songs by Russell Hoban. Sometimes you need something profound.

  10. #2110
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    In Seclusion
    Posts
    1,064
    A Point of Law by John Maddox Roberts - a mystery that takes place during the later years of the Roman Republic

    Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope
    Now I know why I didn't read the whole Chronicles of Barsetshire when I was younger. The other books have not been easy to find. Thanks to the internet I hope to read all 6 volumes this time.
    "The sun rose promptly at dawn."
    Tom Clancy in his novel The Teeth of the Tiger

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.