+ Reply to Thread
Like Tree256Likes

Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2091
    CCL
    CCL is offline
    Climbing Solsbury Hill CCL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Here and there
    Posts
    8,600
    Quote Originally Posted by William13 View Post
    I am about halfway through the Warden. I don't know what made me decide to pick it up. I do remember that I read the Palliser series many years ago (and saw the tv series) and enjoyed it. I don't remember if I have ever read the whole Barchester Towers series. The Warden probably is not the best of the series, but I wouldn't read a series without starting at the beginning. I am enjoying it. I find the subject matter interesting (in the Warden it is church reform to put it simplistically) and I like the way Trollope writes. After some of the books I have read lately, it is nice to read someone who writes in such a straightforward manner.
    I love Trollope. The Barsetshire series is pretty good; my favourite of the series is Barchester Towers.

    Geek & Critical - Cold Comfort Farm? Great movie. I've never read the book. Hmmm...must think about it.

    About to start The Death of Achilles by Boris Akunin. It's one of a series of Russian detective books with the compelling Erast Fandorin as the sleuth-star (have to wait for them to be translated from the Russian). I'm not a huge fan of detective/mystery stories, but I really like Akunin's work.
    If you type "google" into google you can break the internet.

  2. #2092
    RENThead JLuvs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Commuting for Work
    Posts
    6,267
    I just finished reading: Annie Freeman's Fabulous Traveling Funeral by Kris Radish.

    For Katherine Givens and the four women about to become her best friends, the adventure begins with a UPS package. Inside is a pair of red sneakers filled with ashes and a note that will forever change their lives. Katherine’s oldest and dearest friend, the irrepressible Annie Freeman, left one final request–a traveling funeral–and she wants the most important women in her life as “pallbearers.”

    From Sonoma to Manhattan, Katherine, Laura, Rebecca, Jill, and Marie will carry Annie’s ashes to the special places in her life. At every stop there’s a surprise encounter and a small miracle waiting, and as they whoop it up across the country, attracting interest wherever they go, they share their deepest secrets–tales of broken hearts and second chances, missed opportunities and new beginnings. And as they grieve over what they’ve lost, they discover how much is still possible if only they can unravel the secret Annie left them....


    That is a synopsis from her official site.

    http://www.krisradish.com/publications.html

    This book made me laugh, cry and remember some friend that I have tragically lost. It is a brilliant book, but do have a hanky nearby.
    Whenever you see darkness, there is extraordinary opportunity for the light to burn brighter.
    -Bono

  3. #2093
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    I'm enjoying a lovely extended weekend at my parents' house in northern Spain and spend most of my time lounging about by the pool, reading. (I know, lucky! ) Pure bliss. Here are the books I've read so far:

    Invisible Monsters by Chuck Pahlaniuk. I loved this book! If you're no stranger to the works of Bret Easton Ellis, enjoyed the movie Fight Club (which was based on the novel by Chucky P., as he's known by his fans) and have a fairly strong stomach, you'll adore this. Aside from being amazingly written and quite the page-turner with constant twists and turns, plot-wise, it also has a certain poignancy about it as it addresses complex questions about today's obsession with beauty. Fans of America's Next Top Model should definitely pick this up: you'll never think about the modeling industry the same way again. My next stop in the wonderfully dark and twisted world of Chucky P. will be his latest novel, Haunted, which received mixed reviews but nevetheless seems absolutely intriguing to me. Can't wait.

    The Art of Detection by Laurie R. King. Yay! Kate Martinelli is FINALLY back after a much-too-long hiatus, during which King has devoted herself entirely to the admittedly wonderful Russell/Holmes series. Good news for fans of Russell/Holmes and Martinelli alike: this novel deals with Sherlock Holmes, although in modern-day San Francisco. Erudite, well-written and edge-of-your-seat thrilling, the plot deals with a murdered Sherlockian and a manuscript that could or couldn't have been penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself when he visited San Francisco back in the 1920´s. It features a fairly lenghty story within the story that will certainly change the way you perceive Sherlock Holmes. Meanwhile, the novel finally finds Kate Martinelli and her long-time partner Lee in a happy, solid place - they so deserve it!

    American Gods by Neil Gaiman. I haven't finished this yet - at 600+ pages, this is a rather lenghty read. I'm enjoying every page of it, though. Part horror, part fantasy, part Great American Novel on the Road with a dark streak, American Gods is packed with mythology, suspense, and horror. Amazing stuff. I'll make sure to pick up its sequel, Anansi Boys, as well as Neverwhere, which Lucy recommended to me, as soon as I finish this.

    Right. The pool beckons. I can't believe I'll be back to the mundaneness of everyday life, with heavy, grey skies to boot, in less than two days. I'd better make the most of the time I have left here.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  4. #2094
    Being VIP Yardgnome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Harnessing my evil for good.
    Posts
    5,472
    I just started reading The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory. It is very interesting so far. I actually have had a hard time putting it down.

  5. #2095
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Charming
    Posts
    9,355
    geek, because I know your taste is impeccable, I've put a reserve on Invisible Monsters.

    Re the Gaiman - I must be a sucker for fairy tales, because I prefer Stardust and Coraline to both American Gods and Neverwhere.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

  6. #2096
    FORT Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl View Post
    Another great book. Have you seen the movie starring Kate Beckingsale? It's really good, and if you can believe it, the name Kate Beckingsale actually guaranteed that you were in for a great cinematic experience once upon a time. (Pre-Underworld, that is.)

    I just started reading Light on Snow by Anita Shreve. It is my first novel by Shreve, but I'm sure it won't be my last. Beautiful language and captivating story. She reminds me a bit of Alice Hoffman and Sue Monk Kidd, both of whom I adore. Light, pleasant reading that lingers with you long after you've finished reading. I'm all for approachable novels that still maintain a high literary quality.

    Any Anita Shreve fans out there who can tell me what to read next?
    I've just read my first Anita Shreve book and enjoyed it a lot and am about to start my second. I read The Pilot's Wife and will next read A Wedding in December. I love finding new authors. Other than that, I'm reading one of our newer Canadian authors, Anne Marie MacDonald, I've read Fall on my Knees and will next read The Way the Crow Flies. I'm really looking forward to getting into that one.

  7. #2097
    FORT Fan kikijanet88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    canada
    Age
    26
    Posts
    271
    I just finished reading Eye of the storm by VC Andrews. She is the greatest writer according to me. I can really relate to her characters. She can make you love the characters or hate them. Although her books are now being written by a ghostwriter, because she passed away some time ago, her books still contain her own way of writing. I own every single one of her books and I can't wait for the next one to come out. I encourage you all to at least read Flowers in the attic. That is her best book ever!
    Love is in your blood.

  8. #2098
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    In anticipation of the October 24 release of Lisey's Story, I am re-reading some of Stephen King's back catalogue. At the moment, I'm absolutely captivated by Bag of Bones, which I read and loved when it was first published in the late 90's. It's even better the second time, especially since I'm reading it in English this time. I gave up reading English language literature in translation a couple of years ago, mainly because I get cranky whenever I find mistakes. Also, a translation, no matter how good, will always be an interpretation of the author's intentions, which (to me, at least) often makes the overall vision blurred or distorted, even. So, original S.K. it is. I know that Bag of Bones is a favourite among Stephen King fans here at the FORT, and I can understand why. Apart from being an old-fashioned, pleasantly creepy ghost story, it is also a moving tale of love, loss, writing, and redemption. I'm loving the references to Daphne DuMaurier's classic bestseller Rebecca, too.

    Next in line in Stephen King land, in no particular order: The Dark Tower (the first one; if I like it, I'll read the entire series), Hearts in Atlantic (which I've never read), and The Stand (the complete and unabridged version, which I've never read). I'll probably squeeze in a couple of books penned by other authors in between, though. Has anyone read No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy? I picked it up in the library last week and it seems like a great read. I'll probably read that one next. I have my summer reading all sorted out, standing all shiny and new and unread on my bookshelf waiting for me, so I know what I'll be reading over the next few months. Bliss!

    Quote Originally Posted by AJane View Post
    geek, because I know your taste is impeccable, I've put a reserve on Invisible Monsters.
    Aw, thank you. Let me know how you like it. It's pretty disturbing in parts, but I think the underlying message of the book justifies it. It is no way near the likes of American Psycho, though, and besides being slightly twisted, it is also very funny. I had several laugh-out-loud moments while reading it, including a not-so-PG13 dinner conversation which is hilarious.

    Re the Gaiman - I must be a sucker for fairy tales, because I prefer Stardust and Coraline to both American Gods and Neverwhere.
    See, and I only like fantasy (if, in fact, one can give Gaiman the fantasy label. He seems to transcend genres to me) that is mostly based in the real world. That sounds like an oxymoron, doesn't it? To me, the best parts of American Gods were the ones set in Lakeside and other "real" - as in of this world, although alternative worlds seep in - places. I really enjoyed the novel although I felt it could have benefitted from some editing; the final 200 pages or so dragged on a bit. I'll definitely pick up its sequel, Anansi Boys, as well as Neverwhere, as soon as I've worked myself through my rather hefty summer reading pile.

    ETA: Cleop, I loved The Way the Crow Flies! One of the best new novels I've read so far this year. Let us know how you like it. The same goes for A Wedding in December: I haven't read it yet, but I plan to, and I'd love to know how others felt about it before I pick it up. Get my money's worth and so on. (Yeah, I'm cheap )
    Last edited by geek the girl; 05-31-2006 at 10:31 AM.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  9. #2099
    Wild thang Rattus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    In the trees
    Age
    54
    Posts
    6,911
    geek, I have also put a hold on Invisible Monsters, and am now reading Stiff (can't quite recall the entire title). What I've learned from that book is that I am really glad I didn't follow through on my early wish to be a mortician - I don't think I would have made it.

    With respect to the Canadian book I was referring to in an earlier post, but couldn't remember the name of (gingko biloba is of no help to me), it's A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews. You've probably heard of it since it's gotten such rave reviews.

    And speaking of my horrible, horrible memory, when I was putting a couple of books on hold at the library I realized that though I don't remember my cell phone number, my boss' extension, the birthdays of more than three people (myself included) or my wedding anniversary date, I do have my library card number memorized. Now what does that say about my life.
    All I wanted was a 45, a stinking 45 - the record or the gun. I'd even settle for the damn malt liquor. - Al Bundy.

  10. #2100
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Charming
    Posts
    9,355
    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl View Post
    See, and I only like fantasy (if, in fact, one can give Gaiman the fantasy label. He seems to transcend genres to me) that is mostly based in the real world. That sounds like an oxymoron, doesn't it? To me, the best parts of American Gods were the ones set in Lakeside and other "real" - as in of this world, although alternative worlds seep in - places. I really enjoyed the novel although I felt it could have benefitted from some editing; the final 200 pages or so dragged on a bit. I'll definitely pick up its sequel, Anansi Boys, as well as Neverwhere, as soon as I've worked myself through my rather hefty summer reading pile.
    To me Gaiman is like a less-gory Clive Barker. Have you ever read any of Barker's stuff? Imajica is a lengthy read but also has the fantasy/real world balance, as does Weaveworld (my personal favourite). Barker's imagery is more vivid than Gaiman's, though I do think Gaiman's Coraline is superior to Barker's Books of Blood (if we're talking shorter stories - Coraline is more of a novella).

    I don't consider myself a fan of fantasy fiction, but I absolutely loved Piers Anthony's Incarnations of Immortality series. The books in the series are full of subtle wit, and if you can take a dose of mythology mixed in with Christian scripture, you would really enjoy the series. The premise of the series is that the "incarnations" (Death, Time, Fate, War, Nature, Evil (Satan), and Good (God) ) are human beings who by chance are thrust into their immortal roles. The books are set in the 20th century, but with a few twists. If you're interested (they are fairly quick reads) make sure you start with the first book, On A Pale Horse (the Death incarnation) as all the characters are intertwined throughout the series. It's best to read them in order. I liked these books so much, one of my cats is named after one of the human incarnations of Fate. They are really entertaining, if a little blasphemous.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.