+ Reply to Thread
Like Tree256Likes

Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #2031
    Right Here, Right Now Britannia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    130
    Finished "Pope Joan" by Donna Cross. It was interesting - very historical novel in that a lot of it is guessing and writing stuff in that probably never happened, but the fact that there may have been a woman pope was fascinating to me. Love, sex, war, religion...all that stuff. Easy to read.

    Just finished "The Devil Wears Prada" - a completely different book! I enjoyed it because I didn't really have to think hard ( a bonus after being stressed with doing accounts for our taxes this past couple of weeks!)

    Finished today a re-visitation of Nick Hornby's "How to be Good". I re-visited it because it was on my bookshelf and I hadn't read it for a couple of years. I think I enjoyed it better this time round than I did the first time I read it. Still don't really understand the last line. Geek the Girl perhaps you can translate. Does it mean the marriage is doomed? Not as good as his other stuff. Geek- have you read any of Tony Parson's stuff? Kind of Hornby-ish.

    Now I'm changing jobs, the library is no longer as easily accessible, so I may have to start walking up to the 2nd hand bookstore at weekends.
    It's a fair cop guv - you got me bang to rights and no mistake!

  2. #2032
    Right Here, Right Now Britannia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    130
    Critical, I usually read the Narnia Chronicles at least every 2 years. I love them. Horse and His Boy is great isn't it?
    It's a fair cop guv - you got me bang to rights and no mistake!

  3. #2033
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    Quote Originally Posted by Britannia View Post

    Finished today a re-visitation of Nick Hornby's "How to be Good". I re-visited it because it was on my bookshelf and I hadn't read it for a couple of years. I think I enjoyed it better this time round than I did the first time I read it. Still don't really understand the last line. Geek the Girl perhaps you can translate. Does it mean the marriage is doomed? Not as good as his other stuff. Geek- have you read any of Tony Parson's stuff? Kind of Hornby-ish.
    I also have How to be Good on my bookshelf, but unlike you, I haven't read it. Don't know why; I just haven't been in the mood, I suppose. Also, everyone keeps telling me that Nick Hornby isn't as good as he used to be and I don't want to go downhill from High Fidelity (which I loved) and About a Boy (which I really liked). So sorry, can't help you with the last line.

    As for Tony Parsons, I haven't read any of his stuff. I like his back story, though: he was a high-profile music journalist back in the late 70's and got to interview all the big '77 punk bands and - this just might intrigue me more than him having been chummy with the likes of the Clash and Sex Pistols - he's columnist and writer Julie Burchill's ex-husband, and she's badmouthed him publicly on numerous occasions. People keep recommending me his books, and I am a sucker for British lad lit, so I suppose I should give it a go. My dad really likes him, incidentally. Which Parsons novels have you read? Are they any good?
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  4. #2034
    FORTfruity applesauce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,099
    I just started "Garlic and Sapphires the secret life of a critic in disguise" by Ruth Reichl. My husband downloaded it last year and thought I would enjoy reading it. So far so good!

  5. #2035
    RENThead JLuvs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Commuting for Work
    Posts
    6,266
    Just finised reading Odyessy of an Eavesdropper My Life in Electronic Countermeasures and My Battle Against the FBI by Martin L. Kaiser III with Robert S. Stokes.

    If any of you have seen Enemy of the State, Gene Hackman's character is based on Martin and he created most of the survelliance devices that were used in that film, obviously they are used for other things.

    Very interesting read for those of you who like to see the inner workings of things without it being too technical and to hear how the FBI treated him.
    Whenever you see darkness, there is extraordinary opportunity for the light to burn brighter.
    -Bono

  6. #2036
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    My workload has eased up a bit, so I finally got the chance to start reading Sugarmilk Falls. My expectations were quite high and so far, it hasn't disappointed. Beautifully written and atmospheric with heaps of local colour and mysterious things of the past, it reads a bit like a Canadian Twin Peaks. Can't wait to find out what reallyhappened in the sleepy little town twenty years ago, and why everyone appears to be hiding something... I'm really glad I stumbled upon this book. Too bad Ilona Van Mil hasn't written anything else. According to the blurb, she teaches law at Essex University. That's certainly a stretch!

    I've read and enjoyed quite a few contemporary Canadian novels by female authors lately: Anne-Marie McDonald, Mary Lawson, and now Ilona Van Mil, who, while she now lives in the U.K., apparently grew up in Canada. Do any of our Canadian FORTers (I'm looking at you, AJane! ) have any further suggestions? Margaret Atwood is already one of my favourites, as is Michael Ondaatje, so I have those two famous Canadian writers covered. What I'm looking for is intriguing, atmospheric and well-written stuff, preferably set in a rural environment. My boyfriend and I are obsessed with the idea of going to Canada, and since we can't afford the trip right now, I'd like to take my Canadian journey vicariously through fiction.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  7. #2037
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Charming
    Posts
    9,355
    Obsessed with going to Canada? Never have I heard anyone say that before...I knew I liked ya, geek.

    Canadian authors...well, an oldie but a goodie is Margaret Laurence, standby of junior high English classes. Don't let that scare you. Try The Diviners - Morag is simply one of the best fictional heroines ever.
    Margaret Laurence hails from my home province. I visited her former home in Neepawa and her gravesite, which has a beautiful stone angel on it (The Stone Angel is the title of another one of her novels). I stood in the rain and took pictures of it (yes, I know... ).

    Another excellent choice is Carol Shields - also from my home province. The Stone Diaries is her best-known work, and deservedly so. We lost her to breast cancer not too long ago, but she was one of the finest contemporary authors in our country up to her death.

    Robertson Davies is another brilliant pick. Go for The Deptford Trilogies series (reminds me, I must re-read those soon).

    One more, from someone still alive - an underrated novel by Daniel Richler (son of Mordecai Richler, another famous Canuk writer) is Kicking Tomorrow. It's his first novel and has been a favourite of mine for awhile.

    Enjoy.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

  8. #2038
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    Quote Originally Posted by AJane View Post
    Obsessed with going to Canada? Never have I heard anyone say that before...I knew I liked ya, geek.
    Really? Ah, but it's so pretty! The scenery actually reminds me a bit of Northern Sweden, only the wilderness is more apparent in Canada. My boyfriend loves fishing and I'm fairly outdoors-y, so we'd like to travel around a bit in Northern Ontario, which I'm told is gorgeous. British Columbia is a given since it's where the first five seasons of X-Files were filmed and I'd like to go to Toronto, too. Ooh, and Prince Edward Island, for self-explanatory reasons. Whereabouts in Canada do you live if I may ask?

    Thanks for the tips! Lots of promising reading material right there. Carol Shields is one of those authors I keep hearing about and every time someone brings her name up, I make a mental note to pick up something of hers, only to forget all about it until the next time someone mentions her and... well, you get my drift. Didn't she pass away fairly recently (and unexpectedly)? I remember reading an obituary. Unless was her last novel, right? I almost ended up buying it when I visited a bookstore a while ago, but in the end I opted for something else. Would The Stone Diaries be a good place to start, then?

    Again, thanks so much for taking the time to give me a few pointers. The only Canadian authors we covered in English lit were - surprise! - Margaret Atwood and Michael Ondaatje. They're both fabulous, of course, but it's always fun to broaden one's horizon, so to speak.

    Right. The couch and Sugarmilk Falls are calling my name. First, I'd better make sure to add all the books you mentioned to my Amazon wish list since clearly, those mental notes of mine aren't working like they should.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  9. #2039
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Charming
    Posts
    9,355
    geek - I'm currently in Saskatchewan, but hail from Manitoba. Either way, I'm a prairie girl. Not so pretty as the west & east coasts - I'd love to visit PEI myself, and I can confirm that BC is absolutely gorgeous (we're heading that way for some summer holidays this year). With the Laurence & Shields books, you're getting a lot of descriptive passages of desolate prairie wastelands, so be prepared.

    Shields' Unless is extremely sad...I imagine due to her state of mind as it was written when she was terminally ill. She died in 2003 (not terribly unexpected, as it was well-known she had cancer). The Stone Diaries is her best work and definitely a good start. I also loved The Republic of Love - the story is charming and it features my hometown of Winnipeg *wipes away a tear of homesickness*.

    Atwood is queen of Canadian literature, of course, and my hero. Her books include quite a few descriptive passages of Northwestern Ontario - Margaret Laurence's Diviners is also partially set there...you may want to add that to your future Canadian travel itinerary. But bring mosquito spray...lots of it.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

  10. #2040
    RENThead JLuvs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Commuting for Work
    Posts
    6,266
    Quote Originally Posted by momof2dogs View Post
    Seven Types of Ambiguity by Elliot Perlman. It starts out with a main character kidnapping (very non-violently) the son of his ex-girlfriend (whom he hasn't seen in 10 years). The story is told in seven sections, each from the point of view of a different character, explaining what led up to the kidnapping and then moving the story forward and showing how the incident changes the lives of each character. I couldn't put it down, even though it's over 600 pages in paperback.
    Checked this out today and got his first novel too. Your review made him sound great.
    Whenever you see darkness, there is extraordinary opportunity for the light to burn brighter.
    -Bono

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.