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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1931
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCL View Post
    I'm about to start The Divine Comedy. One of my professors said that Lent was the perfect time to read it and I've been meaning to do it for a while. After that I'm planning on The Dante Club & The Historian. I just have to wait until my sister is done with them because it would be kind of rude to pry them out of her hands.
    CCL, The Dante Club was the best mystery novel I read all last year. Great atmosphere, style, and pace, and it certainly doesn't hurt if you've read at least "Purgatorio", the first part of Dante's Divina Commedia. Since I'm morbid, "Purgatorio" is probably my favourite part - and with all the gory details, it's definitely the part with the page turner appeal, if that is something one can say about Dante - but I also love the sacral beauty of "Paradisio". For some reason, I never truly warmed up to the middle part, "Purgatorio". Maybe I should try reading it again?

    Anyway, let me know how you're getting along with your reading!

    As for me, I finished The Historian (loved it, although I felt that it dragged along a bit in the middle) and just picked up My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult. It's my first Picoult, but I have a feeling it won't be my last. It's something as rare as a page turner about complex moral and ethical issues. I know that Jodi Picoult has been mentioned several times in this thread. For those of you who are better acquainted with her back catalogue, where do you suggest I go next? I've spotted both Vanishing Acts and Salem Falls in my local book store - are they as good as My Sister's Keeper?

    For school, I'm reading Inferno by my fellow Swede (and bona fide misogynist nut job - that goes for him, not me, obviously ) August Strindberg. I've always been on the fence about Strindberg. His writing style is amazing, and I love his plays, but his decided hatred towards women really complicates things. He was such a brilliant man in so many ways - why did the idea of feminism scare him so much? Maybe I'll have some answers once I've finished Inferno, which captures the acute mental illness and paranoia he suffered from in the 1890's.

    Are Americans familiar with Strindberg, by the way? He's arguably the most renowned and famous author ever to have come out of Sweden, or at least so all Swedish children are told. I know that Woody Allen is a fan, but I'm not sure whether Strindberg's works are read by American lit majors. It is my understanding, though, that he's best known for his plays, particularly Miss Julie, overseas.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  2. #1932
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
    The novel takes place in America in 1962. The Allied Powers lost WWII and America is occupied by Japan (on the West Coast) and Germany (on the East Coast). Slavery is legal, the few Jews left alive are in hiding. In San Francisco the I Ching is commonly used to make decisions. Japan and Germany although officially still allies are competitors in a Cold War kind of way.
    The title refers to the author of a banned book which is circulating underground - an alternate history in which America won the war.
    "The sun rose promptly at dawn."
    Tom Clancy in his novel The Teeth of the Tiger

  3. #1933
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    Originally Posted by ThehappyCynic
    The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold


    Great book!
    I loved this book, but I found the first chapters incredibly difficult to get through. The writing was so matter-of-fact, that my mind couldn't get away from the horrific details and the tragedy of Susie's murder.

  4. #1934
    Right Here, Right Now Britannia's Avatar
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    I was supposed to be reading Adriana Trigiani "Rococo" but I got sidetracked by a library book that's supposed to be back next week - another PD James book, "A Taste for Death" and I'm also reading a spiritual book by Henri Nouwen (I love his books) - just his reflections on life. My favourite of his though is "The Return of the Prodigal Son" where he looks at the parable of the prodigal son, the painting of The Return of the Prodigal Son by Rembrandt, Rembrandt's life, Jesus' life and his own life in parallel. Very interesting.
    It's a fair cop guv - you got me bang to rights and no mistake!

  5. #1935
    Being VIP Yardgnome's Avatar
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    I just finished reading Night by Elie Wiesel. This book was really good, I read it in about 3 hours.

    I started last night The Year of Magical Thinking, I am almost halfway through it, very good.

  6. #1936
    Toby's Slave kimrs's Avatar
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    I am currently reading Three Weeks with My Brother by Nicholas and Micah Sparks. I am on the 6th chapter so far and it has been a very interesting mix of past and present reflections. I have only once so far and that was from the prologue!

  7. #1937
    FORT Fan kattatude's Avatar
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    I'm reading I, Elizabeth by Rosalind Miles and Every Breath You Take by Ann Rule. Historical fiction and true crime.

  8. #1938
    Here's your sign JAFO'S PRINCESS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kattatude View Post
    I'm reading Every Breath You Take by Ann Rule.
    lOVED IT!
    I might as well work. I'm in a bad mood anyway.
    "I like to base my help on how happy you expect to be." Dogbert's tech support.

  9. #1939
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy
    "The sun rose promptly at dawn."
    Tom Clancy in his novel The Teeth of the Tiger

  10. #1940
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    Quote Originally Posted by William13 View Post
    The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy
    Love that book, William13! I'm a big fan of Hardy and that's one of his best. It amazes me that even though Hardy wrote those books so long ago, he can still surprise and shock me with his plot twists.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

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