+ Reply to Thread
Like Tree256Likes

Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1861
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    45
    Posts
    16,426
    I'm about 1/3 of the way through Francine Prose's Caravaggio - which means I'm about 50 pages in. I love Prose's writing style - I read her Lives of the Muses a while back and loved it - and would definitely recommend it, but only if you really love Caravaggio OR you can get it on sale. I think the cover price is around $25.00 and it's only about 150 pages long. I got it from the History Book Club as a set with another book about Caravaggio, The Lost Painting by Johnathan Harr and the price for the set was much lower than cover price.

    In a weak moment at Borders the other day, I bought Ross King's new book, The Judgment of Paris: The Revolutionary Decade That Gave the World Impressionism. He also wrote Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling, which I LOVED and Brunelleschi's Dome, which is next on my list. I guess I've got an art history theme going here!

    I couldn't read Sharon Rocha's book either. The last just desperately sad book I read was Arthur Ashe's autobiography. I got to the letter to his daughter and just lost it. The other biography that had me was the book Gilda Radner wrote not long before she died (I think it was called It's Always Something). She kept talking about getting better.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  2. #1862
    FORT Fogey misskitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    In the Kat House in Kanada
    Posts
    7,704
    I'm reading the E-Myth Revisited by Michael Gerber. Why most small businesses don't work and what to do about it. I'm not even half-way through and I already see how starting your own business can become overwhelming and make one miserable. It's quite interesting, actually.
    Live simply ~ Love generously~ Care deeply~ Speak kindly

  3. #1863
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Charming
    Posts
    9,353
    While I'm waiting for a reading schedule for the Book Club I've started Bret Easton Ellis' Lunar Park. Not bad, but I wonder where the autobiographical material stops and the fiction begins (I'm so paranoid after the Frey scandal - but this IS billed as a novel.)
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

  4. #1864
    Right Here, Right Now Britannia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    upstate NY
    Posts
    130
    I've just finished The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova and reluctantly handed it back to the librarian. I really loved it. I was engrossed from beginning to end. I'm not usually a fan of the 'vampire' genre, but this had me completely hooked because of it's subtlety and historical aspects. I highly recommend it.

    Now I'm halfway through North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell. I saw the TV serial on BBC America over the holidays but heard that the book was very much better. IT's the story of a young woman's life being totally changed when her father leaves the Church in a crisis of conscience to move from the comfortable south of England to the industrial north. Initially very upset by the move and repulsed by the difference in her surroundings and the people, she becomes aware of the poverty and suffering of the cotton mill workers. Of course there is a love interest in the shape of one of the mill owners.
    It was written in 1854, serialised in one of Charles Dicken's newspapers. Elizabeth Gaskell was also a contemporary of Charlotte Bronte. I'm thoroughly enjoying it so far.
    It's a fair cop guv - you got me bang to rights and no mistake!

  5. #1865
    Miss Jackson Fan MICHEY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    810
    I'm reading The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy. I am loving this book. I've never read Pat Conroy and I am enjoying style, even though I'm finding I do need a pocket dictionary
    "We don't see things as they are, we see things as we are." ~Anais Nin

    "Sometimes the heart sees what is invisible to the eye." ~H. Jackson Brown Jr

  6. #1866
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    Quote Originally Posted by AJane View Post
    While I'm waiting for a reading schedule for the Book Club I've started Bret Easton Ellis' Lunar Park. Not bad, but I wonder where the autobiographical material stops and the fiction begins (I'm so paranoid after the Frey scandal - but this IS billed as a novel.)
    AJane, the autobiographical material is very limited. I'd say that the only thing that's actually real is the fact that he is a writer called Bret Easton Ellis and has published the novels mentioned within the novel. It's a work of fiction toying with the idea of identity and (fake) authenticity more than anything else. But I know what you mean - I found myself asking the same questions when I started reading Lunar Park. After a while, though, the story takes such a decided turn into the world of fiction that I put it out of my mind.

    Let me know how you like it. I'm pretty sure there's an impromptu review penned by moi somewhere deep inside this very thread

    As for what I'm reading, or rather in the process of beginning to read: I'm just about to start reading The Ghost Orchid by Carol Goodman. She writes literary thrillers, typically set in atmospheric settings somewhere in upstate New York, and incorporates culture with suspense incredibly well. Very well-written stuff, too. If you haven't read anything by her, her debut novel The Lake of Dead Languages is a great place to start. It reads a bit like a more obvious thriller version of The Secret History - it's set in a school and deals with Latin - except of course it suffers in comparison. (The Secret History is one of my all-time favourite novels, though, so this doesn't mean that it's bad by any means.) I'll keep you posted on what I think about The Ghost Orchid since I'm literally just about to read the first page.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  7. #1867
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fangtasia - The Bar With Bite
    Age
    45
    Posts
    16,426
    Quote Originally Posted by Britannia View Post
    I've just finished The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova and reluctantly handed it back to the librarian. I really loved it. I was engrossed from beginning to end. I'm not usually a fan of the 'vampire' genre, but this had me completely hooked because of it's subtlety and historical aspects. I highly recommend it.

    Now I'm halfway through North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell. I saw the TV serial on BBC America over the holidays but heard that the book was very much better. IT's the story of a young woman's life being totally changed when her father leaves the Church in a crisis of conscience to move from the comfortable south of England to the industrial north. Initially very upset by the move and repulsed by the difference in her surroundings and the people, she becomes aware of the poverty and suffering of the cotton mill workers. Of course there is a love interest in the shape of one of the mill owners.
    It was written in 1854, serialised in one of Charles Dicken's newspapers. Elizabeth Gaskell was also a contemporary of Charlotte Bronte. I'm thoroughly enjoying it so far.
    On both The Historian and North and South! I actually do like vampire stories, but you're right - The Historian is not typical of that genre. It was much more about the "hunt" and the history than the actual vampire. I read North and South for a class on Modern British History years ago and loved it. It was one of my favorite required readings ever. Oddly enough, I'm not really a Dickens fan, but I like Gaskell (I LOVE the Brontes - all of them!).

    I missed part of the TV version, but it looked pretty well cast to me.

    Geek - The Secret History is one of my favorites too! I recommend it to everyone. What did you think of her second book, The Little Friend? I read it, but it didn't affect me in the same way her first novel did. In some ways, it felt self-conscious, if that makes sense. Still well-written, but not as memorable.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  8. #1868
    Anarchist AJane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Charming
    Posts
    9,353
    Ooooh, I absolutely love The Secret History - I've read my copy to tatters. (Wouldn't it make a fabulous movie, if the right screenwriter and director got ahold if it?) I never did get to Tartt's second novel...I really ought to see if the library has a copy.
    All my life, I have felt destiny tugging at my sleeve.~ Thursday Next
    I don't want to "go with the flow". The flow just washes you down the drain. I want to fight the flow.- Henry Rollins
    All this spiritual talk is great and everything...but at the end of the day, there's nothing like a pair of skinny jeans. - Jillian Michaels

  9. #1869
    Who Dat lildago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,522
    Quote Originally Posted by Dinahann
    I don't think I could read it. Her story is so sad that it just takes my breath away, and I'd probably sob aloud through the whole thing.
    Quote Originally Posted by Critical
    I couldn't read Sharon Rocha's book either. The last just desperately sad book I read was Arthur Ashe's autobiography. I got to the letter to his daughter and just lost it. The other biography that had me was the book Gilda Radner wrote not long before she died (I think it was called It's Always Something). She kept talking about getting better.
    I had planned to finish it last night but I was emotionally spent after reading the chapters about finding Laci and Conner's bodies. It took me forever because I couldn't stop crying. All that I have left is the trial. The tragedy that family went through is unthinkable! Reading Sharon Rocha's account has made me realize just how precious our time is with those we love. She constantly expresses how much she wants her back, to hold her, to talk to her, to laugh with her. Hopefully, I can get through the rest of it tonight so I can dive into the book club selection.
    Getting lost will help you find yourself.

  10. #1870
    Here's your sign JAFO'S PRINCESS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    signmaking in INDIANA
    Age
    34
    Posts
    664
    I am currently reading THe vineyard by Barbara Delinsky. Nothing deep or thought provoking but so far an excellent read.

    And I am also reading the diaries of Sylvia Plath on and off. And at the same time her biography. I jump around quite a bit.
    I might as well work. I'm in a bad mood anyway.
    "I like to base my help on how happy you expect to be." Dogbert's tech support.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.