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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1851
    Right Here, Right Now Britannia's Avatar
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    Went to the library yesterday to return some books, and saw "The Historian" by Elizabeth Kostova on the shelf...hurrah! Been dying to read it for a while as so many of you have recommended it and I did a little research on Vlad the Impaler online last night. Not a very nice man! I started it in my lunch hour today and have, very reluctantly, returned to work with the first 40 or so pages swimming in my mind. However, I'm on my own here at the moment and there are no phone calls or filing to do....hmmmmm....
    It's a fair cop guv - you got me bang to rights and no mistake!

  2. #1852
    Coaster junkie vondl0's Avatar
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    I'm reading The Merchant of Venice with my high-school freshman just 'cause I vaguely recall enjoying it when I was a freshman!

    Also Coraline by Neil Gaiman, whose praises have been sung right in this very thread. I have American Gods on my shelf but for some strange reason I'm a bit intimidated by it. Thought I'd cut my teeth on something else by him.

  3. #1853
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vondl0 View Post
    I'm reading The Merchant of Venice with my high-school freshman just 'cause I vaguely recall enjoying it when I was a freshman!
    That's my favorite play to Shakespeare's to read, vondl0. I just get lost (in a good way) in the language. I've never seen a good stage production of it and, disappointingly, the film that came out a year or so ago, wasn't what I hoped. It's wonderful that you're taking such an active role by reading the play as well!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  4. #1854
    Coaster junkie vondl0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Critical View Post
    That's my favorite play to Shakespeare's to read, vondl0. I just get lost (in a good way) in the language. I've never seen a good stage production of it and, disappointingly, the film that came out a year or so ago, wasn't what I hoped. It's wonderful that you're taking such an active role by reading the play as well!

    Thanks, Critical! He was lamenting to me that "it takes a whole page to say one thing!" and I told him that that is what it's about with Shakespeare............the language!

  5. #1855
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    I'm finally delving into my copies of The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis and Yellow Dog by Martin Amis.

    I love The Chronic- (What?) -les of Narnia (Double true!), but Amis is not saying anything new with Yellow Dog--the dangers of fame and celebrity, the power of the media, etc. He did it better in The Information.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  6. #1856
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    Death in the Age of Steam by Mel Bradshaw
    The novel takes place in Toronto in 1856. Isaac Harris is a cashier in a bank (apparently a much more important position than it is today). During the funeral of a politician he finds out that the man's daughter has disappeared. Even though he has not seen her in 3 years when she married another man, he decides to investigate on his own.
    Even though it is somewhat noble of Harris to investigage, his constant mooning about this woman that he hasn't seen in 3 years makes him a rather an insipid character and they mystery isn't all that interesting. The truly interesting part of the book lies in its description of Toronto (where I live) in 1856, before Canada was even a country. The police are not very helpful. The best place to find a policeman is drinking in a local tavern. Streets that I have travelled many times, have horse traffic instead of cars. Not all the streets have lights, and the ones that do are lit by gas. The city was much smaller than - geographically and population-wise. Parts of the city which are now high density or commercial were completely undeveloped. Of course, none of this would mean as much to someone who doesn't live here or know the city well, but I am enjoying the book so far.

  7. #1857
    Courtesy and Goodwill Mantenna's Avatar
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    That sounds like a really interesting read, William13.

    I literally just finished Dean Koontz's Odd Thomas. Wow; what a powerful and exquisitely-written book. I know that many people here are lovers of Koontz's work, and I can see why . . . I'm crazy about his writing style. I also read Dark Rivers of the Heart about a month ago, which I also enjoyed, but the story wasn't quite as compelling or charming as that of Odd.

  8. #1858
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mantenna View Post

    I literally just finished Dean Koontz's Odd Thomas. Wow; what a powerful and exquisitely-written book. I know that many people here are lovers of Koontz's work, and I can see why . . . I'm crazy about his writing style. I also read Dark Rivers of the Heart about a month ago, which I also enjoyed, but the story wasn't quite as compelling or charming as that of Odd.
    Manny, our timing is uncanny! I'm just about to finish Odd Thomas as well. I needed something bathtub-friendly for my afternoon off and since Odd Thomas a) has earned rave reviews from my fellow readers here at the FoRT, and b) is available in paperback, I decided to pick it up. Cell, while a great read, is in hardcover and as such doesn't mix well with a bathtub. And yes, I go insane if I don't have anything to read, regardless of where I am or what I do. To use a bathtub just to get clean is not an option; I need letters, and plenty of it. Anyway, this is my first Koontz, but it definitely won't be my last. Odd is such an amiable character, and I love the wry sense of humour coupled with the scary stuff. There's a tenderness to the story, too, which I love. To me, it reads a bit like a "monster of the week" episode of The X-Files - I was happy to find a reference to Mulder and Scully in there to boot. Unfortunately, today's reading material will consist of post-structuralist literary theory (sigh) but I'll think of Odd, Stormy, Little Ozzie and all the others fondly while studying and I can't wait to finish it tonight. I would have devoured the whole thing in one sitting if I'd had the time. The best part is that since Forever Odd is out in hardcover now, I won't have to wait for the sequel! I'll have to stay out of the bathtub for that one, but I think I'll manage.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  9. #1859
    Who Dat lildago's Avatar
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    I'm reading For Laci by Sharon Rocha. This is not the kind of book I usually read but my SIL shared some of it with me and I had to read it all. I had planned to borrow hers until I learned where the proceeds from the book go. Only during the initial search for Laci, were search and rescue dogs used. Afterwards, funds were not available to continue searching. So, all proceeds from the book go into a fund for search and rescue. When I heard that, I bought my own copy. And it's a good thing! It's taken me 6 days to get through the author's note and the first 2 chapters. I have to keep stopping because the story is so heartbreaking.

    RIP Laci and Conner.
    Getting lost will help you find yourself.

  10. #1860
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lildago View Post
    I'm reading For Laci by Sharon Rocha.
    I don't think I could read it. Her story is so sad that it just takes my breath away, and I'd probably sob aloud through the whole thing.

    I picked up Cell last night (finally came in the mail) and I've read the first 100 pages or so. I need to stretch this one out a little more, or I'll end up reading it too quickly. I do that sometimes and then find I have to go back and re-read it to get the full effect.

    On a positive note my father, who is a retired cabinet maker, just made me a cherry stained bookcase that's 7' long x 4' high, and I've filled it with books that were just sitting on the floor of my library. In the process I discovered some paperbacks I've never read, which is always a treat!
    Well I was born in a small town
    And I can breathe in a small town
    Gonna die in this small town
    And that's prob'ly where they'll bury me

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