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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1571
    FORT Fogey snoopy's Avatar
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    Wow, giz, you are way more into the political scene than me- am I missing a whole genre? I read to ESCAPE reality, but I googled Jeffrey Archer, and he reads like fiction, but better I guess 'cause it's real.
    Go Tigers!

  2. #1572
    giz
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    Archer wrote a whole bunch of pot-boiler fiction, which is how people would know him in North America. I think they might have even made a mini-series of one of his books, Kane and Abel? (Peter Strauss, Fred Gwynne). In Britain though, he's just as well known for being a Conservative politician and master of smarm. His novels are not my cup of tea, just don't care for that genre, but the prison diary is enlightening. I think, though, that if you don't already know Archer, it would not be as of a read. It helps to be able to picture the odius A. brought down. (Also helps to remind the reader that Archer is very self-serving, so to read the prison diaries with a dose of salt).

  3. #1573
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    Dogs of Riga by Henning Mankell

    I had not intended to read another police procedural as my next book, but one of the used bookstores that I frequent had a bunch of Mankellís books and they are usually hard to find. The chief character, Detective Wallander is rather Kafka-esque in his constantly worrying about the meaning of his life and the usefulness of being a police detective. In Dogs of Riga a murder investigation in his native Sweden ends up with him travelling to Latvia to try to help the police there solve a murder.

  4. #1574
    AWWWW... yeah! Onyx's Avatar
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    "How to Enron Proof Your 401K". I leave it on my desk as a message to the company bigwigs.


    Oh wait, they never come to my desk.

    Good book though.
    ]

  5. #1575
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by William13
    Dogs of Riga by Henning Mankell

    I had not intended to read another police procedural as my next book, but one of the used bookstores that I frequent had a bunch of Mankellís books and they are usually hard to find. The chief character, Detective Wallander is rather Kafka-esque in his constantly worrying about the meaning of his life and the usefulness of being a police detective. In Dogs of Riga a murder investigation in his native Sweden ends up with him travelling to Latvia to try to help the police there solve a murder.
    Oh cool, a Swedish book! I have yet to read a Mankell; I prefer American and British crime novelists. I suppose it's a bit too close to home when the murders take place in an environment you know by heart. I much prefer my gruesome murders at a distance, say in downtown L.A. (where I've never been).

    Since the beginning of term, I've been reading pretty much around the clock. Mostly course-related stuff: To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf (wonderful! Do read it), The Trial by Kafka (very, um, Kafka-esque. I liked it, although I think I prefer The Metamorphosis ), the first part of Marcel Proust's Rememberance of Things Past (beautiful language, but it needs to be read slowly, which is pretty impossible when you're on a tight reading schedule. I'd like to read the whole series when I retire ), Ulysses (my head still hurts) and a bunch of Modernist poetry and plays.

    I haven't had time to read something "fun", but yesterday I stumbled across Peyton Place at a booksale. Being Swedish and therefore unaware of all the scandal it supposedly caused when it was released, I picked it up on the strength of the book jacket blurb: "The blockbuster novel that shocked the nation". I'm only a couple of pages in, so I have yet to find the "shocking" elements. Doubt I will, being a Bret Easton Ellis fan and all I like Metalious' writing style though: accessible yet elegant. I love stories about seedy small towns, so I think I'll enjoy this. Has anyone here read Peyton Place? I remember reading references to it in several novels, but I can't for the life of me remember which ones. (A Stephen King novel, maybe?) The edition I picked up has a rather lengthy introduction written by a literary scholar, so I'm guessing its reputation has altered a bit in recent years.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  6. #1576
    giz
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    I didn't even realise Peyton Place *was* a book. I vaguely remember from when I was little people saying the tv show was shocking. And also where Mia FArrow got her start.

  7. #1577
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    I haven't read Peyton Place either, but I think that even before it was a shocking television show it was shocking movie. Of course, what was shocking to the audiences in 1957 probably isn't now.
    I did try reading Remembrance of Things Past once and I realized that I wasn't smart enough to read the whole thing with any degree of comprehension.

  8. #1578
    FORT Fogey Harvest's Avatar
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    I have read Peyton Place. I thought the book was more shocking than the movie.

    P.S. I just finished Oh the Glory of It All, if anyone else has read it and wants to discuss (see my post above).

  9. #1579
    FORT Newbie ParisIsBurning's Avatar
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    what dreams may come by richard matheson ... good book but i dont really like the perception of the afterlife in it
    what are you looking at you infantile stupid?!?... damn you and such... - stewie

  10. #1580
    FORT Fogey cablejockey's Avatar
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    I am reading A Paper Life by Tatum O'Neil. Quite a story and very sad. Just goes to show you can be born into a famous show biz family and be no better off than if you were born into the poorest hovel in third world! Tatum and her brother had an awful start in life. Hope it has a happier ending.

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