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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1481
    An innocent bystander nlmcp's Avatar
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    Thanks gtg, I had finished the book and was wondering what to read next. This gives me a ton of ideas
    I could go east, I could go west, it was all up to me to decide. Just then I saw a young hawk flyin' and my soul began to rise. ~Bob Seger

  2. #1482
    Amethyst YetiSports7 - Snowboard FreeRide Champion Amy Lee's Avatar
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    Just finishing "He's just not that into you" by Greg Behrendt
    Kiss me, ki-ki-kiss me
    Infect me with your love and Fill me with your poison...

  3. #1483
    Right Here, Right Now Britannia's Avatar
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    Finished reading "The Shadow of the Wind" by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. Intriguing and quite gothic book. Loved it.
    Just bought "A Long Way Down" by Nick Hornby. Have been a fan of his since reading Fever Pitch a long time ago.
    In between I am re-reading my old Ngaio Marsh "Detective Alleyn" books...often set in Cornwall, England with lots of "Splendid chaps" and "tally ho and look alive" stuff.
    It's a fair cop guv - you got me bang to rights and no mistake!

  4. #1484
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Britannia
    Finished reading "The Shadow of the Wind" by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. Intriguing and quite gothic book. Loved it.
    I LOVED The Shadow of the Wind and recommend it to everyone I meet! Such a beautiful, atmospheric book. It read like a Paul Auster (whom I adore) novel with more obvious page turner qualities.

    Let us know how you like A Long Way Down, by the way. I'm another Hornby fan, but he really disappointed me with How To Be Good.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  5. #1485
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    I'm about 100 pages into Alexandra Fuller's memoir Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight and it's fabulous. In 1972, her family moved from England to then Rhodesia. They also ended up living in Malawi and Zambia. I'm finding it particularly interesting because she and I are about the same age, but our childhoods could not have been more different.

    After I finish this one, I'll probably read her second book, Scribbling the Cat.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  6. #1486
    giz
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    FORT Fogey giz's Avatar
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    It's interesting to here Paul Aster is good. A friend's wife was talking about him at a party, and I tried to ask, but she did a "I'm a very important person and you are not in my circle" thing, so I never did pursue it. I've been wondering about Don't Lets go to the Dogs Tonight too. I tend not to like things which happen in hot places (hate the heat), but I've heard so many good things about it, I may have to. It'll definetely have to wait til autumn comes though.

    I'm reading Mrs. Dalloway, which is a real revelation. It's cinematic (very MGM musical in a way, all swooping crowd shots in the writing, then zooming in for a close up), and presages our centuries fascination with celebrity and assasination. I haven't liked Woolf at all before, but this one's really good. I'm also reading the Macrina cookbook, yum!

  7. #1487
    Livin' the life Dinahann's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Critical
    I'm about 100 pages into Alexandra Fuller's memoir Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight and it's fabulous. In 1972, her family moved from England to then Rhodesia. They also ended up living in Malawi and Zambia. I'm finding it particularly interesting because she and I are about the same age, but our childhoods could not have been more different.

    After I finish this one, I'll probably read her second book, Scribbling the Cat.
    I loved Don't Let's go to the Dogs Tonight. I'm very enamored of all things African, especially the different cultures and ways of life. It was an excellent book. I didn't realize she'd written another one. Is it autobiographical also?
    Well I was born in a small town
    And I can breathe in a small town
    Gonna die in this small town
    And that's prob'ly where they'll bury me

  8. #1488
    FORT Fanatic charstar813's Avatar
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    I've started reading Jodi Picoult's My Sister's Keeper today.
    Ludicrous speed!

  9. #1489
    My soul... Lonelyguy82's Avatar
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    I just finished reading Jacqueline Susann books. Those books are fab! I couldn't put that damn book down. I read each of the books in just three days.

    My especially favorite book was Valley of the Dolls.... Sex, drugs, and the endless of alcohol, whoa. Some of the characters just reminded me so much like Judy Garland and Marilyn Monroe. It's about three young women who are on the top of the world only to find out that there's no place to go but to go back down.

    Once's Not Enough, I didn't really like the concept of a poor rich girl who's so in love with the image of her own father... So, blah. Didn't really want to get into this.

    The Love Machine, very interesting. It's about a man who has no feelings for whatsoever, so hence, The Love Machine. And all three glamorous ladies fall hard for the handsome rich man with no soul who they thought was the one for them - it's so pathetic. Lol!

    Jacqueline's books are wickedly delicious, I enjoyed it a lot. The only thing I'm so disappointed is that Jacqueline's live was cut too short but then again, life is life and death is death. I'm glad she wrote those books while she was alive.

    I think that's about it.
    Last edited by Lonelyguy82; 08-16-2005 at 12:56 AM.
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  10. #1490
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by giz
    It's interesting to here Paul Aster is good. A friend's wife was talking about him at a party, and I tried to ask, but she did a "I'm a very important person and you are not in my circle" thing, so I never did pursue it.
    Oh, Paul Auster is an AMAZING writer - one of the very few I'm willing to go hardcover for. It's funny you should bring him up as he has a brand-new novel called The Brooklyn Follies coming out soon. I'm ridiculously excited.

    Did you ever see the movie Smoke? Auster wrote the screenplay for that. His basic concept is usually the same: neurotic, weary Brooklyn-based writer makes a surreal discovery of some kind, usually involving literature in some way or the other. He's also a big fan of intertextuality and metafiction; in his newest book, Oracle Night, there are at least two stories within the story - as well as footnotes. Some people find the whole "postmodern" thing quite tiresome. Personally, I like it. Despite the postmodern aspects, his novels are extremely accessible and beautifully written and often flirt with the crime/thriller genre without being plain mystery novels. Do read something of his if you haven't, and don't be deterred by that stuck-up woman. (I hate it when I find out that unpleasant people like the same things as I do. For some reason, I always - perhaps na´vely so - assume that good taste equals good personality. I always end up disappointed when I realize that isn't always the case. But I digress.) All of his novels are worth reading; however, I'd recommend Moon Palace, The Book of Illusions or Oracle Night to start with. His more overtly autobiographical stuff, like The Invention of Solitude, is also worth pursuing. Oh, and his wife, Siri Hustvedt, is equally brilliant. Pick up What I Loved as soon as you can! If you like that, she's written two more, equally great novels: The Blindfold and The Enchantment of Lily Dahl.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

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