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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1461
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl
    So, now I'm alternating it with a book I've been meaning to read for ages - The Hotel New Hampshire by John Irving. About 100 pages in, I'm absolutely smitten. What a great, weird book. I especially loved the starting chapter about the bear and it just gets better. Irving is one of those writers I know I'd love, but for some reason, I always put off reading something by him. Not anymore; I recently bought A Prayer For Owen Meany, which I'll probably dive into as soon as I've finished Hotel New Hampshire.
    Geek - John Irving is my favorite writer and A Prayer For Owen Meany is probably my favorite book! I'm also quite fond of The World According to Garp and really, I love all of his books. The Cider House Rules is the best argument for abortion rights that I have ever read.

    Over the last few weeks, I've finished the new Harry Potter (in one evening! ) and read two by Lorna Landvik - Patty Jane's House of Curl and The Tall Pine Polka - think Fanny Flagg writing about Minnesota. Now I'm reading The Seville Communion by Arturo Perez-Reverte. Here's a little blurb about the book:
    Mysterious, deadly conflicts between history and modernity drive Spanish author Perez-Reverte's latest literate thriller (after The Club Dumas, 1997), an engaging tale of love, greed, faith, betrayal and murder set in contemporary Seville. When a computer hacker penetrates Vatican security to send an urgent, anonymous plea to the pope, Father Lorenzo Quart of the church's Institute of External Affairs -a sort of Vatican CIA - is dispatched to investigate. The hacker's message concerns a troubled 17th-century church in Seville, Our Lady of the Tears. Apparently, the dilapidated church "kills to defend itself." It stands in the way of a huge real estate deal, and two people have died there - in apparent accidents - as they brought pressure to condemn it. A handsome dandy who wears expensive black suits instead of a cassock and knows how to conduct himself in a fistfight, Quart prides himself on his discipline but soon finds it heavily taxed as he's embroiled with a bellicose, elderly parish priest, a blue-jeaned American nun and a stunning Andalusian duchess intent on saving the church from the businessmen (including her husband) who threaten it.
    I'm only about 50 pages in right now, so it's mainly expository so far. It's well written and the concept is intriguing. The verdict so far:
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  2. #1462
    FORT Fogey candor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by William13
    The Secret Man by Bob Woodward.

    I've been a Watergate junkie since the Senate hearings in 1973. I used to rush home from school to watch them.
    You sound like me! I remember everything from John Dean's shiny head to Mo's fabulous earrings. If you're ever in Washington, D.C., go listen to the Nixon tapes. They're stored in an office park in Alexandria, Va. (or at least they were in 1994), which you can get to in a shuttle from the National Archives.
    The clerk gives you a menu of tapes, like "There's a Cancer on the Presidency," and you just sit there in somebody's office and listen to Nixon and Dean like they're in the room with you. Fascinating.
    "If there are no dogs in heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went." ó Will Rogers

  3. #1463
    FORT Fogey Sunnyone's Avatar
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    I just got done with I Know This Much is True, and I loved it. I didn't want it to end! I also read Little Earthquakes (?) and In Her Shoes by Jennifer Weiner. I liked the books, but ...(spoiler below)




    Click to see Spoiler:
    I find that she leaves chapers hanging, so the story doesn't seem complete. After a big buildup, she doesn't say how anything was resolved. In In Her Shoes- she never explained how Charles - the guy from Princeton, and Maggie got back in touch- he was just suddenly there at the end. It was incomplete, and there should have been a chapter with them getting back together.

  4. #1464
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  5. #1465
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by candor
    You sound like me! I remember everything from John Dean's shiny head to Mo's fabulous earrings. If you're ever in Washington, D.C., go listen to the Nixon tapes. They're stored in an office park in Alexandria, Va. (or at least they were in 1994), which you can get to in a shuttle from the National Archives.
    The clerk gives you a menu of tapes, like "There's a Cancer on the Presidency," and you just sit there in somebody's office and listen to Nixon and Dean like they're in the room with you. Fascinating.
    Thanks for the suggestion. I hope that I get a chance to do that, it does sound fascinating.
    Now that I have finished the Secret Man I am going to have to re-read all the President's Men to see what Woodward and Bernstein wrote about Deep Thoat back then.

  6. #1466
    Wonky snarkmistress Lucy's Avatar
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    William, I reread "All the President's Men" after the news about Felt broke (I had to order it off the Internet because all the copies at the local Barnes and Noble had suddenly been bought.) It's still compelling reading to this day.
    It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever. -- David St. Hubbins

  7. #1467
    Nevermind Lotuslander's Avatar
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    Just Finished Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim, David Sedaris.

    I think this is his best book, it's a little darker than his previous work, but also braver and at times, poignant.

  8. #1468
    Go Rooney! buryman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy
    Well, hang on another couple of hundred pages and it will. I liked Rule of Four, but it dragged a bit.
    I expected more out of rule of four. I can't believe it took 5 years to write that. The ending was pretty lame. The whole romance thing added very little to the book.

  9. #1469
    Go Rooney! buryman's Avatar
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    I'm about 250 pages into the Historian by Elizabeth Kostova. She is a very descriptive writer and quite refreshing to read. I'm waiting for the plot to develop further but I'm expecting big things!

  10. #1470
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    I've got two on the go. Jonathan Kellerman's latest-at least at the library--Rage, and Daughters of Eden by Charoltte Bingham. The 'Daughters' book follows the lives of 4 young women on the eve of WW2. They are training to become spies at a former stately home called Eden Park. Better than it sounds.

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