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Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1271
    My soul... Lonelyguy82's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phat32
    Lonelyguy82,

    I'm not sure how I feel about your posts. That is, I'm not sure if you're serious since I think it would be fairly obvious that many, many people consider the Holy Bible a work of non-fiction.

    Having said that, our Administrator, John, discourages religious discussions, and I would ask that we remember that and for us to respect his wishes.

    Now, let's get back to why we think Dan Brown sucks or where Patricia Cornwell went wrong.

    I didn't mean to stir up the trouble or offense to anyone. Sorry.

    Gary.
    Stop the world! I want to get off!

    Young and thriving, I feel infinite. Need I say more?

  2. #1272
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    I can't believe there's a discussion going on about Kellerman and Connelly and I'm not involved! They're two of my favorites in the genre.

    Geek the girl, while I liked both The Poet and The Narrows, if you read the latter before you get through the Bosch books, you will have some plot points given away, since Bosch figures pretty prominently in The Narrows. It won't ruin the Bosch series for you, but you might learn some things about his life that unfold over several of his books. Whichever book you read first, Connelly is a master. He used to live in SoCal (I think he relocated to Florida within the last few years), so whenever he did a book signing, my mother would go and get his newest signed for me. Very cool, but I wish I could've met him myself. I think one of my favorites is Angel's Flight, probably because there's some interesting stuff about L.A. history in it.

    Yeah, Kellerman sort of does fancy himself as Delaware. I like to think of Alex as his alter-ego. He's definitely not as great looking as Alex, but all of the background info is the same. Then again, lots of writers do that - they write what they know. Look at Turow and Grisham.

    On the other hand, I think Cornwell is a little around the bend now. The Jack the Ripper book convinced me that she's not all there. I saw a few interviews with her around the time the book came out and she apparently fancies herself quite the crime solver. She needs to stick to fiction. The only major difference (aside from the fact that Cornwell isn't a medical examiner, of course) between her and Scarpetta is their sexual orientation. I keep waiting for SK to come out of the closet!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  3. #1273
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
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    I think a discussion about Connelly, in light of the new release, deserves its own thread. See y'all there.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things don’t always soften the bad things, but...the bad things don’t always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  4. #1274
    When I'm 64 William13's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Lucy
    Ooh, that sounds interesting. I always love things set in the Victorian era. Do you recommend it?
    Regarding the Detective Murdoch Victorian era mysteries by Maureen Jennings. If you are interested you should start with Except the Dying. I don't think that this is the best in the series (there are 5 so far), but it introduces the character of Inspector Murdoch and certain things do happen in his personal life which makes it a little easier to follow if you read the books in chronological order.
    In Except the Dying, the naked body of a young servant girl is found frozen in a deserted laneway (and she turns out to have been pregant0. The family for which she worked had a lot of secrets. Was her death an attempt to cover up a scandal?
    The book (and the series) certainly looks more at the seedier side of Victorian era Toronto, than among the rich and famous. So if you are interested in that aspect I would recommend it. It is certainly atmospheric.

  5. #1275
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    I finally resolved my dilemma of what to read next. I'm about 20 pages into Brick Lane by Monica Ali. This is the description from Amazon.com:

    Wildly embraced by critics, readers, and contest judges (who put it on the short-list for the 2003 Man Booker Prize), Brick Lane is indeed a rare find: a book that lives up to its hype. Monica Ali's debut novel chronicles the life of Nazneen, a Bangladeshi girl so sickly at birth that the midwife at first declares her stillborn. At 18 her parents arrange a marriage to Chanu, a Bengali immigrant living in England. Although Chanu--who's twice Nazneen's age--turns out to be a foolish blowhard who "had a face like a frog," Nazneen accepts her fate, which seems to be the main life lesson taught by the women in her family. "If God wanted us to ask questions," her mother tells her, "he would have made us men." Over the next decade-and-a-half Nazneen grows into a strong, confident woman who doesn't defy fate so much as bend it to her will. The great delight to be had in Brick Lane lies with Ali's characters, from Chanu the kindly fool to Mrs. Islam the elderly loan shark to Karim the political rabblerouser, all living in a hothouse of Bengali immigrants. Brick Lane combines the wide scope of a social novel about the struggles of Islamic immigrants in pre- and post-9/11 England with the intimate story of Nazneen, one of the more memorable heroines to come along in a long time. If Dickens or Trollope were loosed upon contemporary London, this is exactly the sort of novel they would cook up.
    This fits into the theme of India/Bengali stories I've been reading this past year. So far, I'm enjoying it - well-written and engaging.
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  6. #1276
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    Critical, I read Brick Lane last year and enjoyed it very much. Well-written and engaging pretty much sums up my description of it as well. If you like Brick Lane, I would also recommend you pick up The Namesake and The Interpreter of Maledies by Jhumpa Lahiri. Or did you and I engage in a Lahiri discussion earlier this year? I know that someone here shares my Lahiri love and it could be you. Argh, I need more coffee to clear my mind.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  7. #1277
    Bitten Critical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl
    Critical, I read Brick Lane last year and enjoyed it very much. Well-written and engaging pretty much sums up my description of it as well. If you like Brick Lane, I would also recommend you pick up The Namesake and The Interpreter of Maledies by Jhumpa Lahiri. Or did you and I engage in a Lahiri discussion earlier this year? I know that someone here shares my Lahiri love and it could be you. Argh, I need more coffee to clear my mind.
    yep, have more coffee geek - I'm the other Lahiri fan here I still need to pick up The Interpreter of Maladies. I borrowed The Namesake from my mother and was hoping she'd buy the other book and loan that one to me as well. No luck with that yet

    Last night, I started a Judith Kelman novel (the title alludes me at the moment) - I guess they're considered mysteries. I like to read in the tub and I just couldn't take Brick Lane in there for fear I'd drop it and get it all wet! Hey, it's happened before. The Kelman book was free, so I won't feel bad if it takes a dip!
    Last edited by Critical; 05-19-2005 at 03:00 PM. Reason: Spelling- pass the coffee!
    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' - Isaac Asimov

    I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates, who said, "... I drank what?"

  8. #1278
    FORT Fogey Harvest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Critical
    I'm the other Lahiri fan here I still need to pick up The Interpreter of Maladies. I borrowed The Namesake from my mother and was hoping she'd buy the other book and loan that one to me as well. No luck with that yet
    I got The Namesake from the library on y'all's recommendation.

    Right now I am reading The 48 Laws of Power.

  9. #1279
    The race is back! John's Avatar
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    I'm reading "Resurrection Dreams" by Richard Laymon. I've been a Laymon fan for a while (in the genre of Koontz and King, but freakier).

    Not a bad book, but it's uncovered one of the things I absolutely *hate* about some books - the lack of proofreading before it gets printed. I'm halfway through it, and have seen at LEAST 20 typos. I'm deeply involved in the book, and come across a typo, and it roughly jerks me out of my unreality and back to real life.

    I am going to write the publisher a letter when I'm finished, to complain about the number of typos. It's rare that I come across a book without a single typo, but usually there are only 1 or 2. This is really annoying.

  10. #1280
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
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    I'm halfway through Harlan Coben's latest stand-alone thriller, The Innocent. So far, it's every bit as thrilling and enjoyable as his earlier stuff. He sure knows how to write page turners! I'll probably finish it tonight (I always devour Harlan Coben's novels in two or three sittings, tops) and then move on to another light but hopefully fun read, Bergdorf Blondes by Plum Sykes. This semester has been filled with amazing but not-so-light reads like Crime and Punishment, Madame Bovary and loads of August Strindberg-related stuff, so I feel like reading something light and breezy for a change.

    Oh, and I also have to recommend The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón, which I finished last weekend. An excellent novel, with similarities to both Paul Auster and Umberto Eco but much more bestseller-y. I loved the atmosphere of 1940's Barcelona that Ruiz Zafón creates, and given how much of a bookworm I am, I always tend to love books about books.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

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