+ Reply to Thread
Like Tree249Likes

Thread: What are you reading?

  1. #1261
    Things Happen............ J1NVUPatricia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Bronx, NY
    Age
    24
    Posts
    247
    Payback's A Bitch
    Love is very complicated and complex thing that can be expressed in many different ways. No one really knows the true meaning of love.
    Love Always Patricia

  2. #1262
    Colleen/Dreamer Dreamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1,016
    I just finished Angels and Demons which is the prequel to The Da Vinci Code so I'm going to read that now.

    Yes, I have officially jumped on the Dan Brown bandwagon. They are both great books!

  3. #1263
    My soul... Lonelyguy82's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Age
    31
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl
    I suppose that depends on who you're asking. Personally, I'd go with fiction, but that's just me... It's a great book nevertheless.
    So, you're saying that.. to some, it's fiction, and the others, it's non-fiction. Alrighty. Thanks.

    G.
    Stop the world! I want to get off!

    Young and thriving, I feel infinite. Need I say more?

  4. #1264
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hi, Olivia!
    Posts
    2,312
    Lonelyguy82,

    I'm not sure how I feel about your posts. That is, I'm not sure if you're serious since I think it would be fairly obvious that many, many people consider the Holy Bible a work of non-fiction.

    Having said that, our Administrator, John, discourages religious discussions, and I would ask that we remember that and for us to respect his wishes.

    Now, let's get back to why we think Dan Brown sucks or where Patricia Cornwell went wrong.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  5. #1265
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    Alrighty, back to Patricia Cornwell:

    I finished Trace last weekend and found it infinitely better than the catastrophy that was Blow Fly. The third person perspective still bothered me, but not nearly as much as it did with Blow Fly, and while Scarpetta still comes off as a slightly unbearable know-it-all at times, I felt that Cornwell had toned it down a bit. Still, it's not even close to some of the best Scarpetta novels (I rank The Body Farm, Post Mortem and From Potter's Field the highest.) Definitely a tiny step in the right direction though.
    Click to see Spoiler:
    And it was nice to see Benton Wesley back in action. He's always been one of my favourite characters. I was a bit disappointed that there was no interaction between him and Scarpetta, though. I guess their relationship will be explored in the next novel.


    Any news on when a new Scarpetta novel will be released? When the paperback edition of Blow Fly came out here in Europe last summer, Trace was about to be published a few months later. It was even mentioned in the author biography that came with the book. No word on a new Cornwell, Scarpetta or non-Scarpetta in the paperback edition of Trace. I guess I'll have to satisfy my need for ghastly murders, suspence and gory details elsewhere. I just got the brand new Harlan Coben stand-alone thriller, The Innocent in the mail. Anyone had the time to read it yet? I'm also thinking about acquainting myself with Michael Connelly and George P. Pelecanos, and possibly even explore an old fave in the more hard-boiled genre - James Ellroy. For some weird reason, I love the combination of summer and crime novels.
    Last edited by geek the girl; 05-18-2005 at 06:58 AM. Reason: Edited because I never know how to spell "acquainted" but still insist on using the word in every other post.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  6. #1266
    The race is back! John's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    On the mat
    Age
    43
    Posts
    40,432
    According to Amazon, "Predator" will be released on October 18. That's the next Scarpetta book.

  7. #1267
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    Quote Originally Posted by John
    According to Amazon, "Predator" will be released on October 18. That's the next Scarpetta book.
    Thanks, John. Looking forward to it! So I guess she's keeping the schedule after all. I think Trace was released in hardcover last October.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  8. #1268
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hi, Olivia!
    Posts
    2,312
    Dreamer, IMHO, I don't think Dan Brown is a particularly deep writer, but I confess I find something page-turningly worthwhile in his books. If you've read Angels & Demons and Da Vinci Code, you've got Deception Point and Digital Fortress to look forward to, although neither is anything like Angels or DVC.

    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl
    Alrighty, back to Patricia Cornwell:

    I finished Trace last weekend and found it infinitely better than the catastrophy that was Blow Fly. The third person perspective still bothered me, but not nearly as much as it did with Blow Fly...
    I've never been absorbed into Cornwell's world, and I've tried. It's interesting you should bring up the first person versus third person issue, since my issue with Cornwell/Scarpetta is Cornwell's relationship to Scarpetta--that is, I think Cornwell thinks she's Scarpetta (as Kellerman, in some ways, thinks he's Delaware).

    Any news on when a new Scarpetta novel will be released? When the paperback edition of Blow Fly came out here in Europe last summer, Trace was about to be published a few months later. It was even mentioned in the author biography that came with the book. No word on a new Cornwell, Scarpetta or non-Scarpetta in the paperback edition of Trace.
    That's what I like about pop authors: You can time their new releases year after year, almost like clockwork.

    I guess I'll have to satisfy my need for ghastly murders, suspence and gory details elsewhere. I just got the brand new Harlan Coben stand-alone thriller, The Innocent in the mail. Anyone had the time to read it yet?
    No, I haven't, but you've just reminded me that I still need to pick it up.

    I'm also thinking about acquianting myself with Michael Connelly and George P. Pelecanos, and possibly even explore an old fave in the more hard-boiled genre - James Ellroy. For some weird reason, I love the combination of summer and crime novels.
    I couldn't more highly recommend Michael Connelly, and this is a good time, since the latest novel in his Harry Bosch series (The Closers) was released this week.

    The Bosch novels make a lot more sense read in order. Here's a list I once compiled for another Web site:

    The Black Echo (1992)
    The Black Ice (1993)
    The Concrete Blonde (1994)
    The Last Coyote (1995)
    Trunk Music (1997)
    Angels Flight (1999)
    A Darkness More Than Night (2001)
    City of Bones (2002)
    Lost Light (2003)
    The Narrows (2004)

    His other novels, such as Chasing the Dime and Void Moon, are worthwhile, too, but I'm heavily invested in Bosch.

    And this must be my longabout way of saying that "What I'm reading??" is the new Connelly Bosch mystery, The Closers...as soon as I pick it up from the bookstore later today.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

  9. #1269
    Culture slut geek the girl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    The deep, dark woods
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,932
    Thanks, phat, for taking the time to educate me in the world of Harry Bosch. My fiancť is already a big Connelly fan, and we usually have the same taste in crime novels. I usually like to read books in the correct order, so I'll start off with The Black Echo and take it from there. I might take the The Poet - The Narrows route as well, though - my fiancť is currently reading The Poet and is raving about it. Would it make sense to read The Narrows before the other Bosch novels, though? I wouldn't want to be spoiled or anything.

    Quote Originally Posted by phat32
    I've never been absorbed into Cornwell's world, and I've tried. It's interesting you should bring up the first person versus third person issue, since my issue with Cornwell/Scarpetta is Cornwell's relationship to Scarpetta--that is, I think Cornwell thinks she's Scarpetta (as Kellerman, in some ways, thinks he's Delaware).
    So true. Even the physical description matches The Scarpetta/Cornwell egocentricity is one of my biggest pet peeves when it comes to the Scarpetta series. On one hand, it's really annoying, but it's quite entertaining too. Maybe the change of narrative is an attempt for Cornwell to distantiate herself from her narcissistic alter ego Scarpetta? Not sure it works though; while Scarpetta can be annoying at times, I still liked being inside her head.
    "There's more to life than books, you know, but not much more" (Morrissey)

  10. #1270
    Come Along, Pond phat32's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Hi, Olivia!
    Posts
    2,312

    Murder Was the Case That They Gave Me

    Quote Originally Posted by geek the girl
    Thanks, phat, for taking the time to educate me in the world of Harry Bosch.


    My fiancť is already a big Connelly fan, and we usually have the same taste in crime novels. I usually like to read books in the correct order, so I'll start off with The Black Echo and take it from there. I might take the The Poet - The Narrows route as well, though - my fiancť is currently reading The Poet and is raving about it. Would it make sense to read The Narrows before the other Bosch novels, though? I wouldn't want to be spoiled or anything.
    Ooh, The Poet > The Narrows would be an interesting route, and, yes, I think if you want a taste of the Bosch mysteries, you may be better off reading one or two to start, rather than be overwhelmed all at once.

    How about this: Blood Work > A Darkness More Than Night. Blood Work the Novel is about a thousand times better than Blood Work the Film. BW is a non-Bosch novel that features Terry McCaleb (Eastwood's character in the film), who crosses into ADMTN and teams-up with Bosch.

    ADMTN is perhaps one of my favorite Bosch novels, but if you're reading Bosch for the first time, he's never as scary-ass again as he is in this one.

    ETA: Whatever you do, you don't want to read the last three novels first. I wouldn't even read the back-cover blurbs. How do I put this without giving away one iota of what I'm talking about? Bosch has, er, a different living situation in the most recent three novels that's a very pleasant surprise.

    So true. Even the physical description matches
    Yep. As it is with Kellerman/Delaware. I mean, I've seen photos of Kellerman on the dust jacket, and even though Delaware is a "curly-haired," single playboy, I'm like, "Dude, Kellerman, who are you trying to fool? You and Delaware were both child psychologists at a well-known hospital in L.A."

    The Scarpetta/Cornwell egocentricity is one of my biggest pet peeves when it comes to the Scarpetta series. On one hand, it's really annoying, but it's quite entertaining too. Maybe the change of narrative is an attempt for Cornwell to distantiate herself from her narcissistic alter ego Scarpetta? Not sure it works though; while Scarpetta can be annoying at times, I still liked being inside her head.
    Yes, it's that complete, overreaching narcissism that completely turns me off to Cornwell. I find the same thing with Anne Rice.

    BTW, you also mentioned Ellroy. Consider me a huge fan, as L.A. Confidential is one of my favorite films, and Black Dahlia one of my favorite crime novels. I've been struggling with Cold Six Thousand for two years, though, and even though I'm not ready to give it up , what did you think of it?
    Last edited by phat32; 05-18-2005 at 08:06 AM.
    "...Every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things donít always soften the bad things, but...the bad things donít always spoil the good things." - The Doctor

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.